Page 6 of 14 FirstFirst ... 45678 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 205

Thread: Bak mei?

  1. #76
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    VAN.B.C.
    Posts
    4,159
    Some old BM articles in PDf format..


    http://books.google.ca/books?id=adID...page&q&f=false

    http://www.pakmei-uk.com/index-old.htm

    go to "PAK MEI REFS" like 11 articles.

  2. #77
    Some interesting Bak Mei info...And an interesting form too.



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkG37PSGEtE

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGBLG...eature=related

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    VAN.B.C.
    Posts
    4,159
    Quote Originally Posted by TAO YIN View Post
    looks like sanchin kata blended with sup gee with zero transmissions plus little footwork. interesting for sure, I wonder if he did karate & started learning BM?.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Bondi, Sydney Australia
    Posts
    2,502
    The form is called Say Mun, 4 doors.
    Guangzhou Pak Mei Kung Fu School, Sydney Australia,
    Sifu Leung, Yuk Seng
    Established 1989, Glebe Australia

  5. #80
    I personally prefer the performance of the set in this clip

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGr35kPHe-k

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Bondi, Sydney Australia
    Posts
    2,502
    Quote Originally Posted by Olaf View Post
    I personally prefer the performance of the set in this clip

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGr35kPHe-k
    Yes indeed, very nice work. I like it a lot more, for sure.
    Guangzhou Pak Mei Kung Fu School, Sydney Australia,
    Sifu Leung, Yuk Seng
    Established 1989, Glebe Australia

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    VAN.B.C.
    Posts
    4,159
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZEiL...eature=channel

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyA0_qmRu-Y&NR=1

    Just found these links from Vancouver for those interested in Bak Mei

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The Chi (Chicago)
    Posts
    938
    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge View Post
    Sounds awesome! Ten years? Bro, train every day and most importantly train for real. Most people get caught up on forms, ging in forms, two man drills and forget about real fighting. Also, whatever you sifu teaches you, you need to pressure test it. Grab a buddy of yours that fights (we all have boys who like to fight..LOLOL) and do hands with him. You don't go into kickboxing mode, but really train the hands/legs/theories your sifu got you working on. Bro, Jik Bo is a excellent form to start with. Very easy to use once you break it apart. Its a simple one two combo, but can be trained differently depending on what you are trying to do to your opponent.

    Black Dynamite was the shhhhh. Funny as hell.

    Bless,

    Buby
    Unfortunately everybody doesn't have boys who like to fight. I'd love to see video of this training method, and how it's done properly without reverting to kickboxing mode. I don't believe it can be done in the pressure of combat, or at least it'd be real hard to do under that pressure.
    I was on the metro earlier, deep in meditation, when a ruffian came over and started causing trouble. He started pushing me with his bag, steadily increasing the force until it became very annoying. When I turned to him, before I could ask him to stop, he immediately started hurling abuse like a scoundrel. I performed a basic chin na - carotid artery strike combination and sent him to sleep. The rest of my journey was very peaceful, and passersby hailed me as a hero - Warrior Man

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    21,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Faruq View Post
    Unfortunately everybody doesn't have boys who like to fight. I'd love to see video of this training method, and how it's done properly without reverting to kickboxing mode. I don't believe it can be done in the pressure of combat, or at least it'd be real hard to do under that pressure.
    Kickboxing is the most natural way to fight.
    With Bak mei and other southern systems, you kind of go "against" nature and that is why it is so crucial to spar others OUTSIDE the system.
    It takes a bit of work but in the end what you have, hopefully, is something that you bring to the table that is very different from the everyday blend and, hopefully, that can give you an edge.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The Chi (Chicago)
    Posts
    938
    Yeah, I guess you're right and I shouldn't say that because if I'm not mistaken Black Taoist has tons of videos on youtube of exactly that type of training (though not in Bak Mei of course). I should just watch a few of his videos probably if I want to see how this training is done properly. But from everyone's posts I should probably avoid videos of the guy "Maoshan", because apparently he always gets beaten up in his videos.

    Oh, and I found this interesting blurb on PakMet.net since this is a Bak Mei thread:

    "David Wong - Chan Dor's Nephew (Tuesday, January 15, 2002)

    Mr. doucet:
    Sometimes one focuses so much on one thing and misses everything else. I mean, while I was seeing everything in Pak Mei in you web site, I can not believe I missed the name Danny Pai. This name rings a bell. Then after a long "meditation", I remember an event that occurred over 30 years ago. I think you will get a kick out of this:

    It was sometime in the early 70's. Aaron Bank was putting up a show in New York's Madison Square Garden called "The Oriental World of Self-Defense" (or something close to that. After all, it was 30 years ago). That was one of the earliest "shows" Aaron Bank conducted. I was part of an Iaido group to do an exhibition there. My Iaido teacher (and most of the martial artists at that time) was not aware of how this show would turn out but happy to be part of it, as it showed the world what the Oriental Self-defenses are all about (or better yet, what they look like). So, before our turn, we got to watch the others perform.

    Then, after I saw all these "masters" flying over 15 chairs to break one board with a flying side kick, etc., I began to felt really disappointed and just about to leave my spot and go back stage to see if I can find a place to lay down and take a nap. I heard the MC call out someone called Daniel Pai to perform. I turned around and saw this big Hawaiian/Philippino/Asian looking person get on the ring (yes, it was a boxing ring, that much I remembered). He wore a dark blue with white dots outfit not like any of the karate or gung fu uniforms.

    I told myself: Oh no, here is another freak! But he changed my view after I saw his performance. He showed no Kata, form or whatever. He was alone on stage. He brought a few boards to break. I was about to turn away thinking this is another of those board breaking shows. Then, he held 3 board with his left hand using only his fingers (much like a waiter would hold the tray for your drinks). then he broke the boards with his right wrist without even lifting his right arm. I was stunned. Then he did a few more breaks using his finger tips, wrist, etc. All in close distance, without Kia, raising of the arms, or anything dramatic. In fact, he was explaining how he will break the boards and breaking them at the same time. I was so impressed that I don't remember the details of the rest of the breaks. Then, Mr. Pai bowed and stepped out of the ring and disappeared back stage.

    The next thing I remember was our group was on stage (in the ring) going through our performance, but all that time I was still thinking about the way Mr. Pai broke those boards. He broke those boards like I break toothpicks. He did it with such ease and grace that made the other "black-belt Masters" looks like they are trying too hard. Afterwards, our Iaido group went out to eat and all we talked about was Mr. Pai's breaking. Nobody remembered any person in that exhibition coming close to Mr. Pai.

    This is one of those good memories that one gets when seeing a great master perform, or a great movie, a master piece of work from an artist, that make you say: "Ah...that IS wonderful..." or..."That's how it SHOULD be done". If you are in that art, this memory would make you push yourself even harder when you are about to give up on you effort.

    I will always remember Mr Pai's breaking on that day.

    David Wong"

    Last edited by Faruq; 06-23-2010 at 10:17 AM.
    I was on the metro earlier, deep in meditation, when a ruffian came over and started causing trouble. He started pushing me with his bag, steadily increasing the force until it became very annoying. When I turned to him, before I could ask him to stop, he immediately started hurling abuse like a scoundrel. I performed a basic chin na - carotid artery strike combination and sent him to sleep. The rest of my journey was very peaceful, and passersby hailed me as a hero - Warrior Man

  11. #86
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    21,564
    Faruq, from what I gather from Maoshan's training clips and his defeats, his problem is that I addressed in my post:
    Not Enough sparring of people outside your own system.
    You have to learn how to apply your chosen MA and doing it VS itself ( a fellow student) will teach you how to apply is VS pak mei ( for example) and NOT VS MT or BJJ or MMA or whatever.
    This is even more crucial in systems that seek bridges or destroy bridges or are bridge oriented, why?
    Because most modern fighting system do NOT use or "give" bridges.
    See what I mean?

    Nice story from Mike Doucet's website.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The Chi (Chicago)
    Posts
    938
    lol Maybe the Black Taoist should give him some pointers, especially if he's his brother. And great points you make about the sparring with people outside your system and how people don't even use or give bridges nowadays.


    And the stuff on that website is very impressive! If it's all true, and I'd have no way to know one way or another, but if it is then anyone who learned from them'd be an incredible fighter.
    Canada seems to be as much of a hotbed of top notch martial artists as Australia.

    And interestingly enough, they've now got Yau Kung Mun listed on the site as a related system.
    Last edited by Faruq; 06-25-2010 at 08:59 AM. Reason: change from gerund to simple present tense
    I was on the metro earlier, deep in meditation, when a ruffian came over and started causing trouble. He started pushing me with his bag, steadily increasing the force until it became very annoying. When I turned to him, before I could ask him to stop, he immediately started hurling abuse like a scoundrel. I performed a basic chin na - carotid artery strike combination and sent him to sleep. The rest of my journey was very peaceful, and passersby hailed me as a hero - Warrior Man

  13. #88
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Bedsty, Brooklyn
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Faruq, from what I gather from Maoshan's training clips and his defeats, his problem is that I addressed in my post:
    Not Enough sparring of people outside your own system.
    You have to learn how to apply your chosen MA and doing it VS itself ( a fellow student) will teach you how to apply is VS pak mei ( for example) and NOT VS MT or BJJ or MMA or whatever.
    This is even more crucial in systems that seek bridges or destroy bridges or are bridge oriented, why?
    Because most modern fighting system do NOT use or "give" bridges.
    See what I mean?

    Nice story from Mike Doucet's website.

    You're 100% correct! Although, a bridge can always be established (in the same way one can always be taken down to the ground). Hence, the reason for training outside the box. A parry is a bridge, now what you do with that bridge is up to the individual.


    Bless,

    Buby

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Bedsty, Brooklyn
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Faruq View Post

    And interestingly enough, they've now got Yau Kung Mun listed on the site as a related system.
    Nah, they've always kept it real. I noticed that a couple of years ago.

    Bless,

    Buby

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Bedsty, Brooklyn
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Faruq View Post
    Unfortunately everybody doesn't have boys who like to fight. I'd love to see video of this training method, and how it's done properly without reverting to kickboxing mode. I don't believe it can be done in the pressure of combat, or at least it'd be real hard to do under that pressure.

    In the beginning you might revert to kick boxing and thats ok, but thats why having a sifu/coach in your corner to stop and correct your actions is important.

    First off, who's applying the pressure? Short hand systems dictate that you must be aggressive while being passive. Even if you punch first, my mind set has me looking for an opening to counter and land first. It all comes down to understanding your principals and training them properly for combat. Learning to fight your fight is very important. Which includes lots of repetition (I'm not talking forms), conditioning and fighting. How many hours you think a serious boxer puts in the gym to get his form? Like a boxer you have to be put under pressure, you have to see that you can handle it, so that you're no longer afraid. When you're no longer afraid you can begin to have fun. In kung fu it comes more gradually than boxing, due to having more to work with and the intent is different (with the exception to people like a young Mike Tyson). Bro, at times you have to let that dark side come out and be like f*ck it! Reminds of a saying sifu has "Off with the gloves and out with the Pheonix Eyes"

    Bless,



    Buby

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •