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Thread: Baduanjin (8-section brocade)

  1. #226
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    there's a news vid behind this link

    From tai chi to acupuncture, VA embracing new kind of health care
    by Emily Baucum, Fox San AntonioThursday, October 10th 2019

    From tai chi to acupuncture, VA embracing new kind of health care (SBG photo)

    SAN ANTONIO (WOAI/KABB) – The Department of Veterans Affairs is embracing a new kind of health care. For some veterans, acupuncture and tai chi are even replacing painkillers.

    Fox San Antonio was granted exclusive access into the new Whole Health program. San Antonio is one of its flagship sites, and it could revolutionize how the VA approaches chronic conditions like pain and PTSD.

    Take one look at Alan Van Valkenburg’s t-shirt and you know exactly what makes the longtime Army combat medic tick.

    "Dad, grandpa, veteran,” he reads from the shirt. “Those are my priorities.

    Outside the VA Medical Center, he told us about his journey.

    “You're trained from day one to go, go, go. Mission first. And you don't take care of yourself,” Van Valkenburg says.

    He has PTSD from what he saw in war. Two years ago, a major stroke forced him to relearn how to walk and how to see.

    "After the stroke, simple things can be frustrating,” Van Valkenburg says.

    He’s now in the Whole Health Program, working with a health coach and setting goals to improve his mind and body.

    "Were there any areas that stood out to you?" the health coach asks.

    “Physical well-being,” Van Valkenburg answers.

    “So working the body?” the health coach asks.

    “Yes,” Van Valkenburg says. "It comes back to having the PTSD and the depression. And not wanting to do things."

    Dr. Elizabeth Halmai, the clinical director for Whole Health at the VA Medical Center, says the program is a new way for veterans to look at health care.

    "It's to help people re-engage with that purpose or meaning that maybe they lost,” Dr. Halmai explains. "Very different from traditional medicine. We oftentimes refer to traditional medicine as being a 'find it, fix it' model. We're really geared toward the symptoms the veteran is having, and how do we help them address those symptoms."

    Van Valkenburg’s gotten relaxation coaching to rest his mind and even sleep better. There’s acupuncture to help with pain, and tai chi for strength and balance.

    Any veteran can sign up for Whole Health, with any diagnosis. We watched the tai chi instructor modify movements for a veteran with a prosthetic leg.

    "This isn't your grandfather's VA,” reporter Emily Baucum says.

    "Not at all. Not at all,” Dr. Halmai says with a laugh.

    She calls Whole Health a preventive approach that can keep a veteran healthier, longer.

    "We start seeing a reduction in both pharmacy costs and outpatient costs,” Dr. Halmai says. "One of the reasons that Whole Health is actually here is to really tackle that opioid epidemic. We actually have seen a reduction in opioid use and opioid costs for those individuals that actually do engage in Whole Health."

    The VA believes Whole Health could also help prevent suicides. Doctors are working to target people transitioning from active duty to veteran status, a group that’s most at-risk of mental health issues.

    "I'm 56, so I'm not young either,” Van Valkenburg says. “But I've got a couple of friends that are Vietnam veterans and they are embracing this program. Because it's never been here for us before."

    He’s learned to connect his health into the priorities he wears over his heart.

    "It's made me take a harder look at myself and where I want to be from now, to the future,” Van Valkenburg says. So I can see my grandson at 18 and watch him graduate. I want to see him graduate."

    By EMILY BAUCUM
    The still from the vid looks more like baduanjin than tai chi, but we won't quibble.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #227
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  3. #228
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    TCM medical staff practice Ba Duan Jin to prevent respiratory diseases during coronav


    TCM medical staff practice Ba Duan Jin to prevent respiratory diseases during coronavirus outbreak

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  4. #229
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  5. #230
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    We apologize for the delay for our subscribers



    We hope to get our container cleared by this weekend. If so, subscriptions will go out early next week. It is a top priority.

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  6. #231
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    Subscriptions are on their way!

    To all our subscribers, thank you for your patience, support and understanding.



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  7. #232
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    More baduanjin & covid-19

    Chinese nurse teaches coronavirus patients Qigong amid treatment
    Xinhua, March 7, 2020

    HOHHOT, March 7 (Xinhua) -- Some of Chinese medical staff have been teaching COVID-19 patients Qigong, a traditional Chinese system of deep breathing excercise, to help them stay active during treatment.

    A newly posted video on Weibo, WeChat and other social media platforms captured a hazmat-suited nurse teaching his patients Baduanjin, a traditional aerobics form, in a hospital ward in Wuhan, Hubei Province.

    The nurse in the video is Liu Dongming, one of the more than 800 medical workers from north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region to help the epidemic control efforts in Hubei.

    Liu worked in Wuhan Youfu Hospital where most patients were with mild symptoms.

    "Some patients were under great psychological pressure and often stayed in bed," he told Xinhua in a phone call interview on Saturday. "My favorite sport Baduanjin might do some good to them, as the smoothing movements could comfort their body and mood," he added.

    Besides medical care, Liu taught his patients Baduanjin and urged them to practice. Sometimes his activities were limited by the hazmat suit, and he demonstrated it over and over again.

    "More and more patients started to learn and many of them felt refreshed after exercise," he said.

    As a nurse of Baotou Traditional Medicine Hospital, Liu fell in love with Baduanjin several years ago during a preparation for a regional Qigong competition, in which he won the third place.

    His wife and 8-year-old son also became Qigong lovers encouraged by him.

    "I tried to teach more patients as well as my colleagues and would like them to benefit from this kind of Qigong," he said. Enditem
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  8. #233
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    This article is dated too...

    ...and I don't quite agree with it, but it's relevant to our forum here.

    Culture China 22:32, 20-Feb-2020
    Tai Chi, Baduanjin, Chinese-style exercises help you fight coronavirus
    By Wu Yan



    Chinese-style exercises such as Tai Chi and Baduanjin have become popular among patients during the novel coronavirus outbreak, and have been recommended by medical experts to ordinary people to improve physical strength.

    Photos and videos of doctors leading patients with mild symptoms to practice Tai Chi and Baduanjin in makeshift hospitals in Wuhan have gone viral on social media recently. Experts say the exercises are good for patients' recovery and reducing their anxiety.

    What's so good about Tai Chi and Baduanjin?

    Developed from ancient Chinese philosophies and breathing techniques, Tai Chi is a system of meditative physical exercise. Tai Chi is best known as a martial art which has developed into many genres over the centuries.

    In 1956, the then-national sports authority introduced 24-Form Tai Chi. Adapted from traditional Yang-style Tai Chi but simplified and standardized, 24-Form Tai Chi is widely adopted by many nowadays for relaxation and health.

    "In China, a great way (to strengthen the body) is Tai Chi," renowned Chinese respiratory expert Zhong Nanshan said during an interview, "When doing Tai Chi, the practitioner is in a half-squatting posture. Although the static movement does not have significant effect on tachypnea (rapid breathing), it is good for training muscles."

    He said that he had a dozen patients whose lung function level was only 20 to 30 percent of that of a normal person. But by continuing to take medicine, walking and practicing Tai Chi, the patients' movement was greatly enhanced and some were even able to climb a mountain.


    A doctor leads patients of mild symptoms in a Tai Chi practice in a makeshift hospital in Wuhan, Hubei Province. /People's Daily

    Similar to Tai Chi in that it emphasizes breathing, Baduanjin, or Eight-Section Brocade, refers to eight sections of movements performed repetitively and nonstop, reminiscent of brocade weaving.

    Originating from the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127), Baduanjin traditionally contains both a standing and seated set of eight sections of movements each, but has also been expanded to twelve-section movements and sixteen-section movements.

    In 2003, the General Administration of Sport of China re-choreographed the standing version of the aerobic exercise, and promoted it as one of eight health qigongs nationwide. Featuring slow movement and low intensity, Bajuanjin is suitable for all ages.

    For epidemic prevention and control, people are currently being advised to stay at home.

    To help people strengthen the body and develop a healthy lifestyle, the General Administration of Sport of China recently recommended a list of indoor exercises. Tai Chi, Baduanjin and other traditional Chinese-style exercises are on the list.

    "The key is perseverance. It's better to practice every day," Zhang Boli, general counsel to Wuhan's Dahuashan makeshift hospital and president of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, told China Sports Daily.

    He also suggested ordinary people practice according to one's abilities and advance gradually in due order.

    (Cover image: A man practices Tai Chi. /VCG)

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  9. #234
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    The 8 Section Brocade: Baduanjin by Shi Decheng

    Gene Ching
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  10. #235
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    Our newest web article

    Gene Ching
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  11. #236
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    Our newest web article

    Free 8 Section Brocade Poster! READ Shaolin Ways Episode 6: Baduanjin by Gene Ching



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  12. #237
    For those of you that practice this, in part 7, do you breathe out when you punch out or in?
    Me personally I feel it more when I'm breathing out when I punch. I was taught it's not really a punch it's more like you are cradling an egg but I constantly breath out when I'm punching.

    This guy really has an interesting version of it, he does it the exact opposite, and I think it's kind of crazy how big he scoops with his hand after the "punch".
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5exY9MnErqs&t=3s

  13. #238
    Quote Originally Posted by sirdude View Post
    For those of you that practice this, in part 7, do you breathe out when you punch out or in?
    Me personally I feel it more when I'm breathing out when I punch. I was taught it's not really a punch it's more like you are cradling an egg but I constantly breath out when I'm punching.

    This guy really has an interesting version of it, he does it the exact opposite, and I think it's kind of crazy how big he scoops with his hand after the "punch".
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5exY9MnErqs&t=3s
    I breathe out there. I was instructed to breath "naturally" on 7 of the movements, and only one movement had explicit breathing instructions. But by breathing naturally I ended up synching breathing with the other movements as well.

    The link you sent looks unnecessarily elaborate and overcomplicated. Or at least, that kind of approach is not for me. I don't want a technical, academic, counterintuitive approach to moving energies around and breathing in weird tension-inducing ways, but rather a natural approach that allows the psychophysical organism to adjust and harmonise itself in its own way.

  14. #239
    Quote Originally Posted by rett2 View Post
    I breathe out there. I was instructed to breath "naturally" on 7 of the movements, and only one movement had explicit breathing instructions. But by breathing naturally I ended up synching breathing with the other movements as well.

    The link you sent looks unnecessarily elaborate and overcomplicated. Or at least, that kind of approach is not for me. I don't want a technical, academic, counterintuitive approach to moving energies around and breathing in weird tension-inducing ways, but rather a natural approach that allows the psychophysical organism to adjust and harmonise itself in its own way.
    Makes sense to me Rett, on another note, I really like how Yan Lei uses his hands to rotate his torso on the draw the bow section. You can see what I'm talking about here:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eT9uy9_XwA&t=12m18s

  15. #240
    Quote Originally Posted by rett2 View Post
    I don't want a technical, academic, counterintuitive approach to moving energies around and breathing in weird tension-inducing ways, but rather a natural approach that allows the psychophysical organism to adjust and harmonise itself in its own way.
    Okay, I DO want a "want a technical, academic" answer for the following. I've always wondered if there were historical bows where the outward hand presses against it like that, but I don't know how it would be held up. It seems to make sense when I'm stretching the sleeves on my shirts before putting them on...

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