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Thread: Jackie Chan's franchises

  1. #1
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    Jackie Chan's franchises

    I just received a copy of Little Big Soldier. Hopefully I can watch it tonight.

    Heeere's Jackie
    * Source: Global Times
    * [00:02 March 17 2010]
    By Chen Dujuan

    Shortly before Spring Festival, word got out that Hong Kong martial arts star Jackie Chan would open the first theater in his cinema franchise in West Beijing on February 8. Boasting 17 screens, 3,500 seats total and occupying 15,000 square meters of the fifth and sixth floors of Le Mall, north of Wukesong Stadium, it takes the ticket as the largest movie theater in China.

    Starting with the preview of Little Big Soldier, starring none other than Jackie Chan, the theater has been in trial operations up to now; the grand opening is scheduled for April, according to Yang Jie, the marketing assistant of Jackie Chan Yaolai International Cinema and Sparkle Roll Group Limited (based in Hong Kong). They chose the west-side location, Yang said, because "the company aims to offer more luxurious options in West Beijing and the place has convenient transportation, both subway and bus."

    On March 6, to celebrate box office yields of 136 million yuan for his latest flick, Chan and his movie team came to the theater to show their gratitude to his fans and the media in a press event where Chan, appar-ently unfazed by the film's success, sought constructive feedback from the audience, saying, "For a long time, what I've heard is all praise and approval; I don't even see online criticism. I hope audiences can find my shortcomings to criticize me, so that I can make better efforts."

    The event took place in the largest theater, with 599 seats and a 24-meter-wide screen over a hydraulic stage. "The stage was designed for holding concerts and activities such as movie promotions," Yang noted.

    Not so subtle

    It's pretty obvious upon arrival who's behind the theater's opening. Evidence of Chan is endemic, with "Jackie Chan Theater" etched thousands of times on just about ev-erything, Rush Hour posters on the walls and an Action Jackie mannequin dangling from the ceiling, perilously close to the blades of a replica helicopter.

    After letting his audience wait for half an hour, Chan arrived on stage to cheers. "I'm happy to gather with the media and audience friends in our home," he enthused to the over-packed house.

    These shows can never just get going, however. The crowd was first subjected to Vitas' "Opera 2," performed by Hei Ni of the CCTV "Star Boulevard" program. Cue the warm applause again.

    This was followed by university student debate teams arguing about the conclusion of Chan's film and whether or not his character should have died or not – spoiler alert: for the first time in one of his film's, Chan's character does indeed die – with plenty of interjection from the man himself, who may have bitten off more than he could chew in this economy when he said, "All of you are very eloquent. If you graduate and need to find a job, I welcome all of you to work for my company." Then again, maybe he was talking about serving up popcorn and taking tickets in the theater.

    The activity culminated when Chan, ever the performer, sang the theme song of the movie, "Rape Flowers," with a bouquet of the blossoms in his well-muscled hand.

    Checking out the big screen

    Afterward, guests were treated to a viewing of Chan's 1989 film Miracle. Lu Shaoke, 27, a freelance film critic, told Lifestyle, "I was sitting in the 12th row, and I felt the effects were satisfactory. The scale of the screen was the same or even bigger than some IMAX ones. It's only regretful they don't have actually have IMAX."

    Except for that flaw, the cinema is the first of its size and kind to be equipped with top-end 2K digital motion picture projectors from the United States in all screening rooms; it also has film cameras from Italy in five rooms. Some of the screening rooms are wheelchair acccessible, and five offer free hearing aids to the hearing impaired, according to Yang, who also said that 15 more cinemas are scheduled to open within the year, in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou. Each will be themed with one or two of Chan's movies.

    Chan explained his decision to open the cinema to the Beijing Times back in Febru-ary: "The Chinese film industry developed so fast in recent years, so I hope more audiences can walk into cinemas to support its development. I have a plan for the nation to see good quality movies in good quality cinemas, so we plan to offer low ticket prices here."

    However, Yang told Lifestyle, "The price level isn't determined yet. It's always decided by cinema circuit, so probably the price will be comparable to other cinemas in town. But I believe the good visual and sound effects can make this place a better value for its price."

    Address: 5-6/F, Le Mall, No. 69 Yuyuantan Nanlu, Haidian District 海淀区玉渊潭南路69号华熙乐茂商城5-6层

    Tel: 6818-8036
    Gene Ching
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  2. #2
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    Jackie's new camera

    We so need one of these for our work here.
    Jackie Chan-edition EOS 550D probably won't do stunts
    Leonard Goh | Apr 28, 2010

    The bundle of the Eye of the Dragon EOS 550D. (Credit: Canon China)

    What can lock eyes with the baddies, perform death-defying jumps, leap off tall buildings (and helicopters) and save a little girl while wearing an amicable smile? Jackie Chan? Spot-on! Who better to flash that million-dollar smile for the camera?

    Enter the Eye of Dragon EOS 550D released by Canon China, with gold accents around the camera's name and logo near the hotshoe. The US$1,450 package will also come with a specially designed camera strap and leather case. And, instead of the usual 18-55mm kit lens, the snapper will ship with the 18-135mm glass. Did we also mention there's a Jackie Chan photo album bundled as well?

    Strictly for fans of the action auteur, only 2,010 sets of the Eye of Dragon EOS 550D are produced. Just remember that the camera's warranty doesn't cover damage caused by stunts.
    Gene Ching
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    raking it in

    Jackie's got bank.
    Jackie Chan tops Forbes China Celebrity List
    * Source: Global Times
    * [15:34 April 30 2010]

    Hong Kong movie star Jackie Chan ranks number one in the recently released Forbes China Celebrity List of 2010. Taiwanese musician Jay Chou and Hong Kong singer and actor Andy Lau are in hot pursuit.

    Chan, who held a concert in Beijing's Bird Nest in May 2009, became the first artist to perform in the National Stadium. Jay Chou didn't receive good reviews for his movies, but he got more attention for his work in the Hollywood film The Green Hornet with American actress Cameron Diaz. Meanwhile, Lau has starred in three movies, but his secret marriage to Carol Zhu that was exposed grabbed headlines.

    Basketball forward Yao Ming continues to lead the list of celebrities from the Chinese mainland and actress Zhang Ziyi ranks fourth with 25 cover stories. Skit and sitcom actor Zhao Benshan is in the fifth place.

    Writer Guo Jingming who edits Top Novel magazine is in 58th spot, while writer, blogger and racecar driver Han Han is 74th.

    According to Forbes Chinese edition, the two standards for ranking celebrities are personal income and media exposure rate which is judged from 28 popular newspapers, 18 nationwide TV programs and cover stories in 29 magazines.
    Gene Ching
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    JC Group Rising

    The future is Chollywood and Jackie at the forefront.

    Jackie Chan plans turbo-charged slate
    Eight films and two TV dramas in the works
    By Gregg Kilday and David Morgan
    May 13, 2010, 02:00 PM ET

    CANNES -- With projects ranging from a martial arts film that reflects the spirit of his 1978 hit "Drunken Master" to movies designed to showcase rising talent like actress Lin Peng, Jackie Chan is embarking on an ambitious slate of films and TV shows that will play out over the next few years.

    Chan will not be visiting the Croisette this year: He's assisting earthquake relief efforts in China and next month will be busy with promotional chores for "The Karate Kid," which Sony Pictures launches in the U.S. on June 11.

    But his reps are busy here showing distributors the lineup of projects to be produced by Chan's JC Group China and his Jackie & JJ Prods.

    The slate encompasses eight features and two TV dramas. Chan himself will star in four of the films and produce another four projects built around new filmmakers and stars.

    First up for Chan himself is the martial arts film "Drunken Master 1945." Though neither a remake nor sequel to Chan's 1978 hit "Drunken Master," the new film is intended to capture the martial arts spirit that the earlier film also celebrated.

    Mak Sui Fai, the co-writer and co-director of 2002's "Infernal Affairs," will helm the project, budgeted at $15 million, which is aiming to start shooting in February.

    At the same time, Chan will be shepherding several other projects as producer.

    Beginning in August, Steve Woo will direct "The Break-Up Artist," a Chinese Mandarin-language romantic comedy about a young woman who runs an agency that helps couples break up. The $2 million project will star Lin, who walked the red carpet on opening night, and who plays the female lead in Chan's latest film "Little Big Soldier." The Chinese actress was first introduced to a worldwide audience when Zhang Yimou invited her to participate in the opening ceremony of the 2008 Olympic Games.

    Woo also directed the similarly titled 2009 English-language film, "The Break-Up Artist," starring Amanda Crew. But he doesn't consider the new version a remake, since he's adding new elements and lining up famous guest appearances for the film.

    The other projects in which Chan plans to star are:

    -- "Cambodia Landmine," an action/comedy/drama, to be directed by "Little Big Soldier's" Ding Sheng. The $25 million production is scheduled to shoot in Cambodia in February 2012.

    -- "Tiger Mountain," a Mandarin-language action drama, to be directed by Tsui Siu Ming. Budgeted at $50 million and set to begin production in October 2012, the film will boast 3D special effects.

    -- "Manhattan," a $55 million action suspenser in both Mandarin and English, which Chan will both star in and direct is slated for January 2013. It is filming in both China and the U.S.

    "Jackie also wants to promote new directors," said Ramy Choi, director of acquisitions and distribution for Jackie Chan Theater International.

    In addition to "Break-Up," Chan will produce a second film from Woo, the romance "Letter With No Return," set for an October shoot on a $2 million budget, and the suspense pic, "Magic Master," starring Ge You, for which a director is still being sought in anticipation of a February start.

    Additionally, Chan's exhibition chain is expanding its footprint in China. Jackie Chan Theater already has opened 17 theaters and is looking to roll out as many as 65.
    Gene Ching
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    Bawang strikes!!!

    Bad shampoo Bawang. Bad.

    Jackie Chan breaks silence on 'cancer shampoo'
    Posted: 10 August 2010 1234 hrs

    SHANGHAI: International star Jackie Chan has broken his silence on the allegedly cancer-causing Bawang brand hair shampoo that he endorses.

    During an appearance at the Shanghai International Film Prototype Art Charity Auction on Sunday, the action star said: "Incidents like this, where shampoos are reported to have problems, are not new. Someone is trying to harm me and Bawang. It's like when I make a film, my opponents will surely say it is bad. This is very common."

    Hong Kong media had reported in July that samples of Bawang brand Chinese medicated shampoo and products from its Royal Wind brand had been tested and found to contain 1,4-Dioxane, which is classified by the US Department of Health and Human Services as a probable carcinogen (cancer-causing agent).

    These negative reports caused a public outcry and even resulted in Bawang's stocks being suspended from trading in Hong Kong after its share price dived by almost 18 per cent at one point.

    Chan, the spokesperson for the Bawang shampoo which claims to have anti-hair loss properties, and Chinese singer Faye Wong, the spokesperson for Royal Wind, had also come under fire for endorsing the allegedly harmful products.

    Due to legislation passed last year, they may be legally liable if the product one endorses is not up to scratch.

    When asked why he took so long to tell his side of the story, Chan explained that he did not want to add fuel to the fire and believed that the truth would eventually come to light.

    "Now the regulatory bodies have already issued statements that the shampoo passed their standards, so these rumours have been refuted without anyone having to take any action," Chan added.

    "I have always been very careful with what products I endorse. But there are some media who are specifically gunning for me and a few other artistes, I am not sure why, as though it is better that we all just died."

    Bawang had previously issued a succinct statement to clear the air on the matter and said that Dioxane is present in numerous other household products.

    The Guangzhou-based shampoo manufacturer, which had been operating since 1989, also explained that the levels of Dioxane found in its shampoo is well below international safety guidelines and did not pose any sort of health risk to consumers.

    - CNA/ha
    Gene Ching
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  6. #6
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    The Jackie Chan curse

    I'm not sure this author is fully aware of the massive holdings of Jackie Chan. We've really only touched on it here. This article feels like a western lens trying to make sense of the Asian celebrity market, but that's really apples and oranges. The concluding examples of Gifford's sweat shops and Diddy's dog fur don't apply at all in China. Just think about it. That's a completely negligible issue on the other side of the Pacific.
    Jackie Chan: From Kung Fu Win to Commercial Fail?
    Jackie Chan Hawks a Slew of Goods in China, but Some Threaten to Hurt His Reputation
    By SHEILA MARIKAR
    Aug. 24, 2010

    On the big screen, Jackie Chan is usually the guy who brings the pain. But with his latest ventures, he might be the one getting hurt.

    A slew of products sold in China bearing his name, smile and seal of approval have proven defective, prone to explosion, and in one case, potentially damaging to consumers' health. The phenomenon has a name: the "Jackie Chan curse."

    According to The Los Angeles Times, recently, a type of air conditioner that Chan hawked reportedly blew up. In July, rumors swirled that the Bawang-brand anti-hair-loss shampoo the raven-haired action icon advertised could contain carcinogens.

    Chan's representatives did not immediately respond to ABCNews.com's requests for comment.

    The face of the Hong Kong-born Chan, 56, may be more familiar in China than any other. In May, the Chinese edition of Forbes magazine ranked him as 2010's No. 1 celebrity, thanks in part to his many movies (his latest -- "The Karate Kid;" his most popular -- 1998's "Rush Hour") and his prominent role in Beijing's 2008 Olympic games, where he sang during the closing ceremonies.

    In his homeland, he's no mere celebrity. Chan serves as a spokesperson for the Government of Hong Kong. Construction of a Jackie Chan museum is underway in Shanghai.

    Given his larger-than-life status, it's doubtful Chan's career will suffer because of a few product snafus.

    "It's a doubled edged sword for him," said Russell Flannery, Forbes magazine senior editor and Shanghai bureau chief. Although the defective branded products have generated bad press, Flannery said it would not have an impact on Chan's marketing power due to his record of longevity.

    "In the long term, he'll rise above it," Flannery said.

    But the tale of the "Jackie Chan curse" serves as a lesson to all famous folks trying to turn their moniker and mug into a brand name:

    1. Stick to what makes sense. From frozen dumplings to Canon cameras, it seems little falls outside the realm of products Chan is willing to pimp. But as the old, awfully appropriate saying goes, "Jack of all trades, master of none."

    "From a celebrity standpoint, the shotgun approach works because they want to diversify, they want to be as widespread as possible so that if one thing fails, you might not even notice it," said consumer marketing expert Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst with the NPD Group. "But from a business perspective, from a partnership perspective, you're absolutely better off sticking with something that connects with the celebirty."

    It's why Lindsay Lohan should stick to hawking leggings and Martha Stewart can keep on keepin' on with the home improvement kit and kaboodle. In Chan's case: martial arts DVDs makes sense; anti virus software, not so much.

    2. Do due dilligence. Maybe Chan can breeze past the Bawang blunder for now, but if he's not careful, he could go the way of celebrity hawkers gone bad. "Kathie Lee Gifford almost got run out of the industry because of her issue with sweat shops and child labor laws," Cohen noted. "Sean 'Diddy' Combs was invovled with animal fur with his Sean Jean line -- they were using dog and calling it fake fur."
    This article has some great vids of Jackie's ads.
    Gene Ching
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    More on the Jackie curse

    If Jackie Chan says it's good — well, get a second opinion
    The movie star has endorsed tons of products, some of which fail spectacularly. One Chinese newspaper called him 'a man who can destroy anything.'
    August 23, 2010|By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times

    Reporting from Beijing — Judging from billboards and television commercials in China, film star Jackie Chan has never met a product he wouldn't endorse. Travel the country and you'll see the Hong Kong native's handsome visage hawking electric bikes, anti-virus software, even frozen dumplings.

    But although the Chan name has translated to big bucks at the box office, not every product he touches turns to gold. In fact, when news broke last month that an anti- hair-loss shampoo he promoted allegedly contained carcinogens, Chinese cyberspace and media were buzzing about the "Jackie Chan curse."

    Consider the auto repair school that Chan plugged to aspiring Chinese mechanics: It became enmeshed in a diploma scandal. Another of his sponsors, a maker of video compact discs, went bankrupt and saw its manager jailed for fraud. An educational computer that Chan pitched to children called the Subor Learning Machine flopped. And a cola he quaffed named Fenhuang fizzled.

    More recently, an air-conditioner brand that Chan promoted was hit by a report that one of its units exploded. Media wags couldn't resist invoking the Jackie jinx.

    "He has become the coolest spokesperson in history," said an editorial in Oriental Guardian, a Nanjing newspaper. "A man who can destroy anything."

    In the U.S., companies have learned the hard way about the risks of using celebrities to pitch their products. Philandering cost Lakers star Kobe Bryant and golfer Tiger Woods millions in lost endorsements.

    But rather than personal scandals, Chan's difficulties stem from his willingness to shill just about anything, including well-known global brands (Canon cameras), obscure regional products (Sinian sticky rice balls) and so much more (Hong Kong tourism). His seeming lack of discrimination has made it more likely that he would pitch some clunkers, analysts said.

    "When you have someone with so many brands, the probability of things going wrong is markedly higher," said Saurabh Sharma, a strategic planning director for Ogilvy & Mather Beijing. "It's rare to be in the industry for so long and also be clear of controversy."

    Chan's representative said the 56-year-old actor was not available for comment.
    Sinian sticky rice balls?
    Gene Ching
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    wacky site

    interesting stats however...
    Top 20 Growing Facebook Pages: Disney, Converse, Music, ******* and Jackie Chan
    November 2nd, 2010
    By Sara Inés Calderón

    There’s an interesting mix of Pages on our Top 20 Growing Facebook Pages list this week. We had our traditional musicians on the list, big brands, as well as some new faces, such as the movie “*******” and action movie star Jackie Chan. To get on our Top 20 this week Pages needed to add between 457,300 and 387,300 Likes, we keep track of this growth via our PageData tool, which counts the number of Likes added to Pages daily.

    Top Gainers This Week
    Name Fans Gain↓ Gain, %
    1. YouTube 18,618,509 +872,336 +4.92
    2. Disney 9,227,053 +779,041 +9.22
    3. Facebook 24,266,151 +736,773 +3.13
    4. Coca-Cola 15,863,959 +716,890 +4.73
    5. MTV 7,778,440 +683,285 +9.63
    6. Rihanna 13,050,137 +658,058 +5.31
    7. The Simpsons 11,515,616 +652,028 +6.00
    8. Converse All Star 8,043,656 +631,188 +8.52
    9. Eminem 18,473,414 +626,379 +3.51
    10. Usher 6,462,654 +605,540 +10.34
    11. Converse 6,473,795 +585,007 +9.93
    12. SpongeBob SquarePants 10,636,763 +578,817 +5.75
    13. Harry Potter 5,382,237 +546,244 +11.30
    14. AKON 10,080,578 +512,488 +5.36
    15. Oreo 12,616,818 +490,249 +4.04
    16. ******* 3,588,555 +483,715 +15.58
    17. Adam Sandler 9,760,094 +478,063 +5.15
    18. Toy Story 7,561,717 +467,030 +6.58
    19. Shakira 11,892,635 +466,126 +4.08
    20. 成龍 Jackie Chan 6,889,149 +457,314 +7.11

    Big brands topped our list this week.

    YouTube was in first place after adding 872,300 Likes to make it to 18.6 million total. Disney’s main Page, which we wrote about last week, made it to second with 779,000 new Likes and a 9.2 million total. Facebook was in third place with 736,800 new Likes and a total of 24.2 million; the company has been heavily involved in U.S. elections this year. Coca-Cola’s Page was fourth, adding 716,900 new Likes to a 15.8 million total.

    MTV was fifth, adding about 683,300 new Likes to reach just over 7.7 million fans. Converse All Star’s Page was at number 8 and passed 8 million fans by adding 631,200 new Likes; the Converse Page was eleventh with 585,000 new Likes and a total of 6.4 million with a big growth spurt right before Halloween. Both Pages might have benefitted from the Frankenpic Halloween app we wrote about last week.
    Gene Ching
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    Jackie's on the cover of SUCCESS


    FEB 2011 issue

    The Reinvention of Jackie Chan
    The master of martial arts comedy once thought he had everything figured out. Until he realized he was living a lie.

    Mike Zimmerman January 10, 2011

    Jackie Chan has felt fear. That’s what he tells me, though I’m not sure I believe him.

    He says, “When I am faced with doing a dangerous stunt, I would be lying if I said I never get scared.”

    Makes sense. We all feel fear, of course. But in general, when we’re doing what we love, can we really call it fear?

    Thus the root of my skepticism: Chan appeared in his first film at age 8 and today he’s 56. He’s been doing action films, stunt work and fight scenes for 48 years. A reasonable person could argue that what he’s talking about is not fear, but the sweet, reckless burn of adrenaline. That’s less fear, more exhilaration fueled by risk, and a lot of people thrive on it every day. Maybe it feels like fear. But it’s never held back Jackie Chan from anything. In fact, that adrenalized state may be more responsible for his ongoing success than anything.

    But in the course of our conversation, Chan tells me two stories. Each of them details a very clear and defining moment, which combined to make Chan feel a different kind of fear—terror, really—that nearly paralyzed him and derailed everything he’d built up until that point.

    These events happened a long time ago to a Jackie Chan we, in the United States, never got to know because thankfully they taught him some nasty lessons about the difference between ego and soul.

    How we sell ourselves to the world defines who we are to anyone who shakes our hand. Chan realized he had to remake the product he was selling. To understand, you need to look at how he lives his life today. How he transformed himself cuts right to the core of his success—and his entire character.

    ***

    It started with school. Or a lack of it. Born in Hong Kong, “I never received a proper academic education,” he says. “I never learned to read or write. These are things I have taught myself over the years.” The education he did get came at a martial arts academy, which of course opened a path to film stardom. “I learned all the skills that helped me become a success as an action star, but the one thing that I regret about my past is never having an opportunity to go to school to learn academics.”

    Philanthropy is a major part of Chan’s life now, a progression of bigger and bolder charities he’s founded over the years, many of them geared around educating disadvantaged children. “In many remote areas of China, children don’t have the basic necessities for an education. The school buildings are either dilapidated or non-existent. My Dragon’s Heart Charity team finds these places and then I visit them to see for myself what the conditions are like. We have a ceremonial groundbreaking and I meet the children and the teachers and tell them that I will build them a school and that I will come back to visit when the school is finished. There is nothing in the world as satisfying as returning to see the brand new school, to see the children in their new uniforms carrying backpacks containing all the supplies they need for a good education. It is very emotional and joyful for me.”

    He tells some moving stories about his experiences. The little girl who needed glasses so badly that she bumped into walls, couldn’t attend school or play sports. She didn’t want to burden her family with the cost. (“Two dollars U.S.,” he marvels. “Can you imagine this?”). Or there’s the handicapped teacher who walked several miles to and from school on crutches because he had no legs, yet was still driven to teach. “There are endless stories. I do the best I can to help as many people as possible. No one should have to suffer, especially children.”

    Many successful people start charities and give back, of course. Chan makes it very personal, however. He does as much of it as he can in person, actually meeting the people he helps. There’s a reason: He wasn’t always like this. In fact, in his own words, he describes young Jackie Chan as a guy with “a bad attitude, so full of himself.”

    “I didn’t have any idea what I was doing,” he says. “When I was 20, one day I had five dollars U.S., the next day I’m a millionaire. I had no education, so I started buying luxury cars, jewelry. All I cared about was how to spend.”

    This led to one of those defining moments: His first foray into charity work—but the lip-service, image building, P.R.-type of giveback. “My manager arranged for me to visit a children’s hospital to give out Christmas gifts,” he recalls. “When I got to the hospital, there was a pile of wrapped presents and all these sick little kids. I handed out the gifts, but I had no idea what was inside the boxes. I hadn’t picked any of them out myself—my manager had done that. When those little kids started thanking me for being so nice and bringing them presents,” he pauses here. “I felt like such a fraud.”


    ***

    Chan’s films—he’s best known in the United States for the Rush Hour movies—are a whirlwind of action and slapstick comedy. His characters are always in just-this-much over their heads, which of course leads to the laughs. Incredible fight choreography helps, too. No one uses an aluminum ladder against multiple foes like Chan. His style is no accident. When it came time to first sell the Jackie Chan brand—long before “branding” was standard-issue business-speak—Chan faced expectations and had to make a choice.

    “When Bruce Lee passed away, [filmmakers] looked to me as a replacement for him,” he says. “I realized quickly that no one could be just like he was, so I started adding humor to the action and developed my own unique style.”

    It was the smartest thing he could’ve done. Not only did it help him dodge what would’ve been an inevitable backlash against him by Bruce Lee purists, he became, all by himself, Jackie Chan.

    What he didn’t expect? Becoming a self-absorbed, venal, twentysomething movie star. By the end of the ‘70s, Chan was China’s highest-paid movie star. The next logical step: Go to the United States and do American films. His debut was The Cannonball Run, an epic farce about a cross-country road trip starring Burt Reynolds, who at the time was America’s highest-paid movie star. And a funny (but not to him) thing happened when Chan got here.

    “I thought I was a big star,” he says. “And people would ask my name. I say, ‘Jackie Chan!’ They say ‘What? Who?’ Jackie Chan! I say. Nobody knows me. The big star was Burt Reynolds. I was making half-a-million dollars U.S. [per film]. Burt Reynolds was making 5 million. I said, ‘My God. He’s the big star. I’m nothing.’”

    And Jackie Chan felt an amazing thing: Fear. Real, honest fear about what he thought he was, seeing what he really was, and realizing that his entire future depended on what he would become. “There are two kinds of human beings,” he says. “One is a good person; you’re respected, everyone remembers you, and 50 years later they’re still talking about you.” He’d become the other kind of person, whose values were paid for in cash.

    But what could he do about it? He was still a young hotshot with no formal education or any experience being a “real” person. Where should he begin? What should he change? Even worse, how could he change, when he’d already worked for years creating a box-office persona the folks back home had embraced?

    The answer would come soon with Chan’s hospital Christmas present episode. That sealed the deal and he started down a different path. And the change wasn’t as difficult as he thought it would be.

    “That day I vowed never to do something like that again. From then on I actually did go out and choose the gifts for the kids and when I brought them to the hospital and handed them out, I felt that I was doing the right thing. That experience really changed my thinking. I realized, What have I done for this world, for myself, for my family? Nothing. I totally changed my approach.”

    ***

    He made more films. He started more charities. And he found he enjoyed the charities as much as he enjoyed his work. He didn’t have to sell anything. The change he made in himself, a change to make sure he never felt that way again, was legit. “I realized that when I see somebody smiling, I’m happy,” he says. “So one by one, year by year, I do more charities and it makes me happier. It was a snowball getting bigger and bigger.”

    Genuine laughter and enthusiasm became the foundation of Jackie Chan’s brand—which is now a multimillion-dollar venture even if you don’t count the movies. Chan does an incredible amount of side work as an entrepreneur and businessman, though he’s not known for it here because he does so much of it in China. He has interests in state-of-the-art movie theaters, restaurants, gyms and more. In a way, he’s become a developing market ambassador.

    “Every day I have a thousand thousands of things to do,” he says. “When I get tired, someone will sit down with me and talk about a project or business or a charity, and I just wake up. I’m interested in every business because right now China just opened and everyone around the world—especially the U.S.—wants to get in. I’m lucky that for the last 20 years I have very good connections with American friends, so anytime they want to get into the Chinese market, they talk to Jackie. Sometimes I help them. Sometimes I’m their partner, then we both make money. I take what I need for myself and the rest goes to charity.”

    And they buy in like crazy because what he’s selling—Jackie Chan—is the genuine article.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  10. #10
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    Filtered 'pure' air in Jackie's theaters

    RGF Working with Jackie Chan Sparler Roll
    RGF and Beijing UST enter into strategic partnership with Jackie Chan Sparkler Roll International Cinema Group

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    PRLog (Press Release) – Mar 01, 2011 – West Palm Beach, FL – Ron Fink, President of RGF Environmental Group, Inc. announced that RGF and its authorized distributor Beijing UST Tech have entered to a Strategic Partnership with Beijing Sparkler Roll International d/b/a Jackie Chan International Theater Group to supply, on an exclusive turnkey basis, indoor air purification systems utilizing RGF’s proprietary patent pending Photohydroionization (PHI) technology and design for Sparkler Roll’s high end cinema multiplexes throughout China.

    The Jackie Chan International Theater was designed after U.S. multiplex cinemas as the demand for high end U.S. made products, technologies and lifestyle has become rampant in China. Beijing Sparkler Roll’s management team sought out RGF via our distributor specifically for our experience and renowned reputation as a high level American environmental technology designer. “It is amazing that many large Chinese companies such as Beijing Sparkler Roll are now seeking out RGF, a small manufacturing company in Palm Beach Florida, making us one of the premiere suppliers of advanced air purification technology to China”, stated Ron Fink, President and CEO of RGF.

    The first cinema, Jackie Chan International Cinema, located in Changzhou, held its grand opening in November 2010, and was the first of many cinema multiplexes being planned and built over the next several years. The grand opening ceremony was personally attended by many luminaries including renowned actor Jackie Chan, partner in Beijing Sparkler Roll as well as Andrew Wang, President of Beijing UST Tech and Sharon Rinehimer, Vice President/General Counsel of RGF (photo below). RGF and Beijing UST will work closely with Beijing Sparkler Roll to continue providing sales support, installation and after-market service to provide the best indoor air quality for their cinema clientele.

    RGF’s PHI technology is a unique induct indoor air quality product that provides low energy air purification that has been proven to kill mold, odors, bacteria, and 88% of an airborne sneeze at three feet; also, VOCs, viruses and up to 99% of MRSA, H1N1 and the Norwalk Virus, to name a few.

    RGF manufactures over 500 environmental products providing the world with the safest air, water and food without the use of chemicals. RGF has sold over one million PHI cells in 33 countries.

    For additional information, please contact RGF Environmental Group, Inc., 3875 Fiscal Court, West Palm Beach, Florida 33404 USA Tel: (561) 848-1826 or (800) 842-7771; Fax (561) 848-9454 or visit our website: http://www.rgf.com.
    I'm not sure how many Jackie Chan theaters there are now. There must be a franchise website somewhere on the web.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  11. #11
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    Coulda had a V8

    I love V8. This is two of my fav products coming together. Can't wait to see the ads.

    press release
    Oct. 3, 2011, 4:37 p.m. EDT
    Jackie Chan Energizes New Ad Campaign to Remind People That They "Could've Had a V8(R)"
    Commercials Highlight Benefit of V8 Juices Versus Other Beverages

    CAMDEN, N.J., Oct 03, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Campbell Soup Company CPB -1.05% is launching a new V8(R) brand advertising campaign that taps action legend Jackie Chan to go head-to-head with other beverages. The advertisements feature Jackie Chan swooping into everyday life scenarios using his amazing athletic abilities -- and his energetic charm -- to switch an unsuspecting person's drink to a veggie-powered V8 beverage. The commercials underscore the switch by closing the spots with the iconic "Could've Had a V8" tagline.

    "It's time for people to take another look at the V8 portfolio," said Dale Clemiss, Vice President, V8 Beverages. "This year we're introducing a variety of new and innovative products for V8, so there is no better time to encourage people to make the switch to our beverages. We believe this campaign's refreshing, fun and lighthearted approach, and the charisma of Jackie Chan will help drive awareness and energize the brand."

    The campaign began airing this week with two new spots:

    -- "Balcony," which features Jackie Chan sliding down a drain pipe, leaping onto a woman's balcony, and deftly replacing her cranberry juice with V8(R) 100% vegetable juice; and

    -- "Sidewalk," where Jackie Chan jumps out of a window, bounces off an awning, lands in front of a woman drinking a smoothie and switches her drink for a V8 V-Fusion(R) Smoothie that not only includes fruit but vegetable nutrition.

    These commercials will be followed by three additional spots. The entire campaign is supported by a fully-integrated marketing effort including print and online advertisements that compare V8 beverages to other drink options.

    "Jackie Chan's amazing creative talent combined with his mind-boggling physical comedy give this campaign vitality and instant likeability," said James Caporimo, Creative Director, Y&R. "Only Jackie Chan could suddenly switch your drink and have you love him for it, which is one of the reasons we believe this campaign will resonate with people and encourage them to choose V8(R) beverages instead of other drinks."

    The campaign was created by Y&R New York. The production was shot on location in Los Angeles by MJZ and directed by Craig Gillespie, who is best known for directing Lars and the Real Girl and the Fright Night remake. Media planning services were provided by the New York office of The Media Edge: cia.

    About the V8(R) Brand

    The V8 brand is committed to providing delicious, convenient products that help people get more vegetables in their diet. This means an aggressive commitment to innovation which has led to the introduction of 18 new beverages in the last two years including the brand's recent entry into fast-growing categories such as energy drinks and smoothies.

    Today the V8 portfolio includes:

    -- V8 (R)100% vegetable juice, a deliciously-zesty juice that provides two full servings of vegetables at 50 calories in each 8-ounce glass;

    -- V8 V-Fusion(R) 100% juice, which tastes like fruit but is packed with a serving of fruit and a serving of vegetables in every 8-ounce glass;

    -- V8 V-Fusion(R) +Tea, a refreshing beverage that combines fruit and vegetable juices and green tea;

    -- New V8 V-Fusion(R) Smoothie, a perfect puree of 100 percent fruit and vegetable juices that bring the real-fruit smoothie experience home;

    -- New V8 V-Fusion(R) +Energy, a refreshing energy drink made with a blend of vegetable and fruit juices plus natural green tea;

    -- New V8(R) Energy Shots, naturally powered energy shots made with 100 percent vegetable and fruit juices and green tea extract -- only available in select markets.

    All of these beverages not only deliver great taste but also provide vegetable nutrition. For more information on V8(R) beverages, visit www.v8juice.com .

    About Campbell Soup Company

    Campbell Soup Company is a global manufacturer and marketer of high-quality foods and simple meals, including soup and sauces, baked snacks and healthy beverages. Founded in 1869, the company has a portfolio of market-leading brands, including "Campbell's," "Pepperidge Farm," "Arnott's" and "V8." Through its corporate social responsibility program, the company strives to make a positive impact in the workplace, in the marketplace and in the communities in which it operates. Campbell is a member of the Standard & Poor's 500 and the Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes. For more information, visit www.campbellsoup.com .

    Photos/Multimedia Gallery Available: http://www.businesswire.com/cgi-bin/...015489&lang=en

    SOURCE: Campbell Soup Company
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  12. #12
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    Legacy 650

    Jackie Chan Becomes Embraer’s New Kick-butt Ambassador for Legacy 650
    NBAA Convention News » October 10, 2011
    by Liz Moscrop
    October 9, 2011, 10:11 PM

    Embraer’s new brand ambassador will be able to forget Rush Hours at airports around the world when he takes delivery of his new Legacy 650 later this year. Famous for his death-defying stunts as much as his acting, Jackie Chan will become the first owner of the aircraft type in China. The aircraft is due for delivery later this year.

    Speaking via video at Embraer’s press conference at the NBAA 2011 show yesterday in Las Vegas, the star said, “I am looking forward to flying in this marvelous aircraft, soon. China has become a very important market for executive aircraft and I am honored to be a part of Embraer’s efforts in my home country.”

    Although Chan was not present at the show, his business partner was on hand to explain the vibrant red and yellow livery on the jet. Jackie Chan designed the paint scheme, which displays his logo, a dragon image and his son’s initials.

    Ernest Edwards, president, Embraer Executive Jets, said, “I have spent some time with Jackie recently and five minutes in his presence are uplifting.” He added, “Jackie’s ebullient personality, spirit of relentless innovation and commitment to society echo the core values of Embraer. His worldwide prestige makes him an ideal brand ambassador.”

    Market watchers at the show will not be surprised at the Brazilian airframer’s choice of spokesman. China is consistently cited as the fastest-growing market for new business jets.

    Embraer is also still in negotiations with Aviation Industry Corporation (AVIC) about establishing a Legacy 600/650 production line in China, using the infrastructure, financial resources and workforce of their joint venture company Harbin Embraer Aircraft Industry. Edwards said that the discussions had not been concluded yet.

    In the meantime, the appointment of Chan as brand ambassador should “panda” to Chinese tastes.
    This article gets today's bad pun award.

    Here's a Legacy 650
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  13. #13
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    i want one

    and i don't even wear a watch.
    'Jackie Chan' timepiece unveiled at SIHH 2012
    RICHARD MILLE


    RM 057 Dragon-Jackie Chan

    Richard Mille celebrates the year of the dragon with a watch that not only pays tribute to the legendary creature, but also his personal friend, international kungfu superstar Jackie Chan. On the front of the RM 057, a dragon grips the tourbillon bridge in one of its claws, while on the back on the black onyx base plate, a round engraved Jackie Chan signature rotates once every 60 seconds in time with the tourbillon's rotation. Limited edition of 36 pieces in 18K red gold or white gold with a red gold dragon.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  14. #14
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    Jackie's jet

    Follow the link - it's plush.
    First look into Jackie Chan's jet

    Instructed to put on coverings over our shoes (that looked like shower caps made of cloth), lest we ruin his brand new jet - understandable, of course - Plush got an exclusive look into the interior of Jackie Chan's Embraer Legacy 650 jet.

    Now on display at the Singapore Airshow 2012 until February 19, 2012, the US$30 million (S$37 million) jet is on route from Brazil to meet him.

    Some Western media reports say the Hong Kong superstar was given a heavy discount and, thus, offered to be Embraer's Brand Ambassador, especially for China.

    The only customisation on his Legacy 650 is on the exterior that bears his logo with red and yellow - colours of China's flag. That's very patriotic of Jackie.

    Hong Kong's Sino Jet, that is looking after Jackie Chan's jet while it gets delivered to him, shared that Jackie kept to the original fittings of the Legacy 650. He may consider customising the interior, but perhaps at another time.

    The Legacy 650 is very spacious with three distinct cabin zones, a wet galley and the largest in-flight accessible baggage compartment of its class.

    Based on the successful Legacy 600 platform, this jet provides longer trips for this 14-seater plane.

    Jackie's plane can hold up to 13 passengers and is capable of up to eight-hour flights around Asia and elsewhere.

    Embraer has introduced major improvements to its Legacy 600/650 jets.

    Ernest Edwards, President Embraer Executive Jets, says, "These chages are specifically designed to increase cabin comfort and capabilities to ensure passengers have the right environment to either relax or maintain their productivity".

    Improvements include refining the interiors and state-of-the-art cabin management system, improving the interior storage, restyled seats and new finishing materials.

    Other than Jackie Chan becoming the new Brand Ambassador, Embraer has announced that the company has signed an agreement for three Lineage 1000 ultra-large executive jets with China's Minsheng Financial Leasing Co., Ltd., one of the largest financial institutions providing executive jet leasing services in China.

    The order is scheduled to begin delivery in the first semester of 2012.

    Emphasising on the proof of the growth of jets in the Chinese market, Ernest Edwards says, "This deal, having closely followed the order of 13 Legacy 650s last October, is solid proof of the recognition and faith our Chinese customers have placed in Embraer and its products".

    Embraer has also delived three Lineage 1000 jets to undisclosed customers and operators in India, Chinan and Indonesia.

    The Lineage 1000 ultra-large jet is the only jet in its category that can provide up to 19 passengers with five distinct, spacious cabin zones, onboard amenities that include a queen-size bed, stand-up shower, walk-in aft baggage area and complete audio and entertainment systems.

    Embraer has also expanded its customer support in Asia through new partnerships.

    In Asia Pacific, Embraer has appointed authorised service centres in India, Australia and Singapore, and pre-selected another one in Japan, to offer comprehensive maintenance repair and overhaul services to its executive jet operators in the region.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #15
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    ive already asked him to let me borrow it for a night...lets see if he says yes..lol

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