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Thread: Give it up to the elderly!!!!!

  1. #91
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    Carole Taylor

    Utah grandma, 83, receives karate black belt from Chuck Norris
    Monday, July 26th 2021, 3:36 PM EDT
    By Ashley Imlay


    SALT LAKE CITY (KSL) -- Carole Taylor may be 83, but she now has a fifth-degree black belt in karate — an honor she received from Chuck Norris himself.

    The Utah woman's passion for martial arts began 15 years ago at the age of 68, when she started taking her 11-year-old granddaughter to lessons.

    "I thought: 'Wow, this is mental and physical. This would be a good thing for someone my age to do. ... So I asked the teacher if it would be all right if I joined the class, and so that's why I did it," she recalled.

    Taylor learned karate alongside her granddaughter.

    "We both got our first-degree black belts at about the same time," she said.

    On Saturday, that granddaughter was there to watch Taylor show off her skills in front of dozens at Chuck Norris' annual United Fighting Arts Federation International Training Convention. For her demonstration, Taylor chose to show forms of karate including traditional hand techniques, stances, footwork, targeting, focusing and power.

    She performed to the Beach Boys' song "Little Old Lady from Pasadena," because that's where she grew up. Taylor fooled the crowd by using her bow as a cane to hobble onto the center of the mat, prompting laughter and smiles from Norris and the rest of the crowd, a video of the event shows. She then straightened her back and began a display of powerful stances and fierce facial expressions. Taylor received a standing ovation from Norris and many in attendance.

    Afterwards, Norris awarded her a fifth-degree black belt — an accomplishment that takes years to reach in the Chuck Norris System.

    "I was so excited. I was able to bow to him, turn around, he put (a black gi) on me, I turned back around and bowed, and then he grabbed me and hugged me so hard, he actually pulled me off the ground almost … my one foot went up," Taylor said.

    A gi is a traditional karate uniform. When someone reaches the fifth degree, their white top gets replaced with a black top, she explained.

    "(Norris) was so kind, and he's 81, and he made some comments about that he had not been exercising all that much recently and that I had inspired him to go back and to begin to train again, and that made me feel very, very good," Taylor said.

    The Layton woman also teaches karate at the dojo where she learned it. During the pandemic, she taught a student from the class at her own home because they had to social distance. Taylor had the student come to her house every day and they practiced on the patio outside, according to her daughter, Lacey Owens.

    "It helps her mind to stay calm, to be able to focus on all the forms they have to learn, and that really has kept her brain fresh, I would say. It helps her to remember things, to memorize things," Owens said. "The dedication has given her something to keep going after every day."

    Karate isn't the first talent Taylor has developed. She is also an actress who has appeared in plays and films, an artist and a calligrapher.

    But karate has been another life experience Taylor is grateful to have found.

    "It's just one of those things that makes for a more full life for me, and I absolutely love it, and it makes me feel strong, and it makes me feel confident, and it makes me feel as though I'm able to continue to learn," she said.

    When the pandemic kept her home, Owens said karate gave her mother "some purpose in such a crazy time. And now, she can't test again for five years if she wants to go for her sixth degree, but she said to me, 'Why not? Why not? Might as well keep trying."

    Owens said that she and the rest of Taylor's family are very proud of her.

    "My mom's just been through a lot. She's had a lot of things thrown her way, and she's just always found the light in everything and kept on pushing, and just inspiring other people with her love and her kindness, and everybody that meets her is impacted by her light. And I am extremely grateful to be her daughter," Owens said.
    threads
    Give-it-up-to-the-elderly!!!!!
    Everything-you-didn-t-want-to-know-about-Chuck-Norris-and-probably-never-asked
    Karate
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  2. #92
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    Maryanne Thomas

    A 93-year old Vernon woman taught her final Tai Chi class before retiring
    Teaching Tai Chi at 93
    Victoria Femia - Oct 4, 2021 / 4:00 am

    Photo: Doug Geiger
    Maryanne Thomas
    At 93-years old Maryanne Thomas led her final Tai Chi class and officially retired.

    The Vernon resident has been teaching Tai Chi for 32 years and has been an instructor in a rented space at Knox Presbyterian church for the last 18 years.

    “The final class (Sept. 28) included 10 students who have been steadfast with Maryanne for the last 18 years through life’s ups, downs and challenges,” said Thomas’ son-in-law, Doug Geiger.

    “Adding to the celebration were many who arrived at the end of class to give thanks and show their appreciation because this dynamic group of now seniors are more than a class.”

    Thomas said teaching her final class was an emotional one.

    “I’ve been at this for so long, with the same people that were in my class, we’ve known each other for a long time,” said Thomas.

    “They’re my family.”

    At 93-years old, Thomas credits Tai Chi for keeping her active and motivated.

    “It’s very helpful as far as your balance, you improve with each move,” said Thomas.

    “I really enjoyed it, it makes me feel good to see people improve too.”
    threads
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  3. #93
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    Meenakshi Amma

    This 78-year-old great-grandmother is keeping an Indian martial art alive

    Meenakshi Amma, practitioner and teacher of 'Kalaripayattu', has been a driving force in the revival of India's oldest martial art and in encouraging girls to take it up

    BY AFPRELAXNEWS
    2 min read
    PUBLISHED: Oct 4, 2021 04:20:27 PM IST
    UPDATED: Oct 4, 2021 04:30:39 PM IST


    Meenakshi Amma, practitioner and teacher of 'Kalaripayattu', a traditional martial art originated in Kerala, posing for pictures at her family-run Kadathanadan Kalari Sangam school in Vatakara in the Kozhikode district of the state of Kerala
    Image: Manjunath Kiran / AFP

    Deftly parrying her son with a bamboo cane, Meenakshi Amma belies her 78 years with her prowess at kalari, thought to be India's oldest martial art.

    The great-grandmother in Kerala, southern India, has been a driving force in the revival of kalaripayattu, as the ancient practice is also known, and in encouraging girls to take it up.


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    "I started kalari when I was seven years old. I am 78 now. I am still practising, learning and teaching," the matriarch of the Kadathanad Kalari Sangham school, founded by her late husband in 1949, told AFP.

    "When you open the newspapers, you only see news of violence against women," she said.

    "When women learn this martial art, they feel physically and mentally strong and it makes them confident to work and travel alone."

    Kalari, which contains elements of dance and yoga, can involve weapons such as swords, shields and staffs. Reputedly 3,000 years old, and mentioned in ancient Hindu scriptures, it remains infused with religion in the present day.

    India's British colonial rulers banned the practice in 1804 but it survived underground before a revival in the early 20th century and after independence in 1947.

    In recent decades it has come on in leaps and bounds, thanks in no small measure to Meenakshi, who won a national award in 2017.

    Now it is recognised as a sport and practised all over India.

    Inside Meenakshi's kalari hall, her bare-chested son Sanjeev Kumar, a lungi tied around his waist, puts barefoot pupilsn—boys and girls aliken—through their paces on the ochre-red earth floor.

    "There are two divisions in kalaripayattun—one is that kalaripayattu is peace and the other is kalaripayattu in war," said the "gurukkal" (master).

    "It's an art that purifies mind, body and soul, improves concentration, speed and patience, regenerates physical and mental energy.

    "When totally connected mentally and physically to kalari, then the opponent disappears, the body becomes eyes."

    "It's a form of poetry," said civil engineer Alaka S. Kumar, 29, daughter of Kumar and the mother to some of Meenakshi's many great-grandchildren.

    "I am going to teach kalari, with my brother. We have to take over. Otherwise it is gone."
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #94
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    Kung-Fu Grandma

    'It wasn't a ninja move, honestly': TikTok's kung-fu grandma explains her viral reaction to Nelson anti-lockdown march
    The Project 4 days ago

    © The Project Watch: TikTok-famous 'kung-fu grandma' explains her viral ninja stance to Nelson anti-lockdown protesters.
    We've seen a diverse range of protestors out and about recently, but a few days ago a grumpy grandma caught New Zealand's attention for saying enough's enough and taking to the streets with a counter-protest of her own.

    That clip is going nuts on TikTok - so what motivated mysterious Nelson ninja Jan to unflinchingly stand her ground for the sake of public health?

    Speaking to The Project on Friday night, Jan said she had just been out shopping when she tried to cross Trafalgar St at the same time an anti-lockdown march was taking place.

    "They were just there in front of me, coming towards me, and I thought 'well, I'm gonna cross Trafalgar St'. There was a cameraman walking backward towards me, and he said something like, 'you better move lady, they're not going to stop for you'.

    "And I thought, 'actually, let's just give this a try', because I didn't really agree with their sentiments."

    What happened next was pure social media gold. Jan was filmed standing up to the crowd, striking a ninja pose, and then almost immediately being swallowed up by protesters who refused to stop for her.

    "I just stood where I was and the crowd walked past me," she said of what happened next. "It was like a parting… one woman gave me a high-five, which was interesting."

    Jan says her counter-protest came about because she's got friends who are immuno-compromised and those people need to be protected - "so I thought no, I'll make a stand here."

    Slightly disappointingly, Jan concedes the stance she took up was more to do with fears the swarm of protesters would bowl her over, rather than an actual martial arts move.

    "I planked my feet… I did cross my arms. It wasn't a ninja move, honestly… it was rather misinterpreted, I think because they put the kung-fu music over it.

    "But yes it was my point, my statement."
    threads
    Give-it-up-to-the-elderly!!!!!
    covid
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #95
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    Almihan Seyiti

    China’s ‘oldest living person’, a Xinjiang Uygur woman born in the 1800s during Qing dynasty, dies at reported age of 135
    An ethnic Uygur, the woman was born on June 25, 1886, according to her Chinese ID card
    Despite state claims she was the country’s oldest living person, this has long been controversial due to a lack of authentication of her age


    Mandy Zuo in Shanghai

    Published: 5:00pm, 20 Dec, 2021

    Alimihan Seyiti (left) talks with her grandson at her 134th birthday party in Shule County, northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, on June 25, 2020. Photo: Xinhua
    A supercentenarian from Xinjiang in Western China whom the Chinese government claims to be 135 years old, but was never internationally verified, died last week, state media has reported.

    Almihan Seyiti, who lived in a village in Shule county of Kashgar city and was declared China’s oldest living person in 2013, died at home on Thursday last week, the Xinjiang Daily said over the weekend.

    One of the ethnic Uygurs, she was born on June 25, 1886, under the rule of the imperial Qing dynasty, according to an ID card issued to her by Chinese authorities, but her incredible longevity has long been controversial due to her unverifiable birth records.

    Guinness World Records said it had not been invited to verify Seyiti’s age independently. If true, she could be the longest-living person in history in the world.
    Alimihan Seyiti, the oldest person in China, died at the age of 135 in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, local authorities said on Saturday. However, there are significant doubts about her real age. Photo: Xinhua
    Currently, Jeanne Calment from France, who died at 122 in 1997, holds the Guinness World Record for being the planet’s longest-living person.

    The oldest currently living person verified by the organisation is Kane Tanaka, a Japanese woman born in January 1903, who has reportedly survived cancer twice.

    Seyiti, who lived with her grandchildren, died peacefully on Thursday morning, the report quoted her family as saying.

    She was ranked at the top of China’s ten oldest living people by the China Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics in 2013 and has held the record since.

    Having altogether 43 grandchildren and great-grandchildren, the woman had lived to see her sixth generation of descendants born, the report said.

    She was married at the age of 17 in 1903 and was said to have adopted a boy and a girl with her husband, who died in 1976.

    She lived a regular life before her death, getting up before 10am and going to bed before 11pm, her family said.

    Her primary carer, grandson Kuerban Nuer, was quoted as saying that she enjoyed singing and dancing and was in the habit of listening to the radio every day. “When hearing music from the radio before sleep, her feet would move along with the rhythm,” he said.

    The Shule county government organised a grand birthday party for the woman last year when she reportedly reached 134. According to video clips and photos from the party, Seyiti, wearing a floral hoop and a paper tiara, sang along to music, cheered with a big crowd, and talked to local officials.



    Mandy Zuo

    Mandy joined the Post in 2010 and has been reporting on China news ever since. Her work covers a range including China policies, culture and society news.
    So her secret was singing and dancing?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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