Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 91

Thread: Give it up to the elderly!!!!!

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    Ota (Hanshi 7th Dan) vs Takasaki (Hanshi 8th Dan), 112th Enbu Taikai

    Kendo match: Enbu Taikai: Ota (Age: 102) and Takasaki (Age: 93).



    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    Chung Yeung festival

    Hail and hearty, the elderly Chinese who defy their advancing years with range of stunning physical feats
    Men who can still do the splits in their seventies and beyond, an octogenarian push-up queen and an ageless boxer show off their prowess
    PUBLISHED : Sunday, 29 October, 2017, 4:49pm
    UPDATED : Sunday, 29 October, 2017, 4:49pm
    Alice Yan



    Some of China’s fittest elderly people have been displaying their prowess with physical feats that would challenge many people half their age to mark the Chung Yeung festival on Saturday.
    To mark the occasion, the website of People’s Daily published pictures and stories about senior citizens across the country who have remained fit and strong.
    One of them was Liu Fuzhong, a 73-year-old Jinzhong resident in Shanxi province.
    He was reported to spend about eight hours a day practising physical exercises in the park and often amazes his audience by doing the splits and high kicks.
    Liu also hangs himself upside down from a tree in front of his house, for over 10 minutes every day.


    Liu Fuzhong is still able to do the splits at the age of 73. Photo: Handout

    Liu was not the only one still able to do the splits. Zhang Chenglin, 96 and from Taiyuan in Shanxi, was also said to be well known in his town for doing this stunt.
    One slightly younger fitness fanatic was 60-year-old Chen Ming from Changchun, Jilin province, who still takes part in regular bouts in the boxing ring. He said many people who encountered him thought he was in his Forties.
    Joining this name list of gymnastic superman and superwoman was an unnamed 97-year-old man from Chongqing who can do a push-up with only three fingers from each hand and Li Guochuan, an 84-year-old woman from Fuzhou, in Fujian province, who is able to do 200 push-ups in 20 minutes.


    Li Guochuan, right, can do 200 press-ups in 20 minutes at the age of 84. Photo: Handout

    China is one of the world’s fastest ageing countries. In 2015 there were more than 220 million people aged over 60 on the mainland, accounting for just over 16 per cent of the whole population.
    Experts predict that China will have 500 million residents aged over 60 at the middle of this century.
    Chung Yeung, or the Double Ninth, is a festival that falls on the ninth day of the ninth lunar month.
    Traditionally it was a time for families to honour the spirits of their ancestors and it has also become an event to celebrate the elderly in mainland China.
    Ultimately, this is where Kung Fu gets the last word in martial arts - longevity.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    Masazo Nonaka

    The Key to Longevity for the World's Oldest Person Alive? Sumo Wrestling and Hot Springs
    By ASSOCIATED PRESS Updated: April 11, 2018 8:27 AM ET

    (TOKYO) — Masazo Nonaka has enjoyed soaking in northern Japan’s hot springs for many years — probably longer than most people.

    The supercentenarian, whose family has run a hot springs inn for four generations, was certified Tuesday as the world’s oldest living man, at age 112 years, 259 days.

    Nonaka received the certificate from Guinness World Records in a ceremony at his home in Ashoro, on Japan’s northern main island of Hokkaido, and celebrated with a big cake decorated with berries.

    Born on July 25, 1905, Nonaka grew up in a large family and succeeded his parents running the inn. The 105-year-old inn is now run by his granddaughter Yuko. He regularly soaks in the springs and also enjoys eating sweets, especially cakes.

    Nonaka, wearing a knit cap and a kimono-style jacket, flashed a smile and posed for a group photo with his family, making a victory sign with his right hand.

    He dug into the cake with a spoon after it was cut, and said, “Delicious,” according to NHK public television.

    “Thank you,” he said.

    His family members say Nonaka still moves about by himself in a wheelchair.

    He reads a newspaper after breakfast every morning, and loves to watch sumo wrestling and samurai dramas on TV. But his favorite pastime is soaking in the hot springs and relaxing.

    Nonaka has outlived all seven of his siblings, as well as his wife and two of their five children.

    He is one of about 67,800 centenarians in Japan, the fastest-aging country in the world, with the highest average life expectancy — 80.98 for men and 87.14 for women, according to the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare.

    Guinness says Nonaka replaced Francisco Olivera of Spain, who died earlier this year at age 113, as the world’s oldest man.

    A 117-year-old Japanese woman, Nabi Tajima, who is currently the oldest living person in Japan, is expected to be certified as the world’s oldest person, replacing Violet Moss-Brown of Jamaica, who died in September at age 117.
    Hot springs, sumo wrestling and samurai dramas FTW!

    THREADS:
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    Sumo
    Favourite Samurai movie
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,887
    Not 'Kung Fu' but Muay Thai:



    I like this a lot, except for the weird, altered photo of Sammo Hung at 1:10.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    RIP Nabi Tajima

    World's oldest person dies in Japan at age 117
    By ASSOCIATED PRESS
    APR 21, 2018 | 9:05 PM | TOKYO


    Nabi Tajima, left, had been hospitalized since January. Masazo Nonaka, right, is the world's oldest man at 112. (Kikai Town / Kyodo News; Masanori Takei / Kyodo News)

    The world's oldest person, a 117-year-old Japanese woman, has died.

    Nabi Tajima died of old age in a hospital Saturday evening in the town of Kikai in southern Japan, town official Susumu Yoshiyuki confirmed. She had been hospitalized since January.

    Tajima, born Aug. 4, 1900, was the last known person born in the 19th century. She raised seven sons and two daughters and reportedly had more than 160 descendants, including great-great-great-grandchildren. Her town of Kikai is a small island of about 7,000 people halfway between Okinawa and Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan's four main islands.

    She became the world's oldest living person seven months ago after the death in September of Violet Brown in Jamaica, also at the age of 117. Video shown on Japanese television showed Tajima moving her hands to the beat of music played on traditional Japanese instruments at a ceremony to mark the achievement.

    The U.S.-based Gerontology Research Group says another Japanese woman, Chiyo Miyako, is now the world's oldest person in its records. Miyako lives south of Tokyo in Kanagawa prefecture, and is due to turn 117 in 10 days.

    Guinness World Records certified 112-year-old Masazo Nonaka of northern Japan as the world's oldest man this month, and was planning to recognize Tajima as the world's oldest person.
    Long live Masazo Nonaka!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    RIP Nabi Tajima

    The world’s oldest person died at 117. She was the last known person born in the 19th century.
    By Alex Horton April 22


    Nabi Tajima in September. (Kikai Town/Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images)

    At 117, Nabi Tajima was older than modern-day Australia, and everyone else known to live on the planet.

    Tajima, born Aug. 4, 1900, in Araki, Japan, and recognized as the world's oldest person, has passed on that mantle. She died Saturday, having been hospitalized since January, the Associated Press reported, and was the last known person born in the 19th century (which ended on Jan. 1, 1901).

    She was living in the town of Kikai on Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan's four main islands, the AP reported.

    “She passed away as if falling asleep. As she had been a hard worker, I want to tell her 'rest well,'" said Tajima's 65-year-old grandson Hiroyuki, local media reported.

    The title of 'world's oldest living person' is a remarkable, if not fleeting, one. Tajima claimed the distinction in September, when fellow 117-year-old Violet Brown died in Jamaica. Brown was the oldest person in the world for about five months.

    Tajima was in the exclusive group of supercentenarians, people who have crossed the 110-year threshold. The U.S.-based Gerontology Research Group, which tracks certified people who become supercentenarians, reports 36 worldwide. All but one of them are women, and 18 of them are Japanese. Good diets and supportive family structure have been linked to Japan's world-leading life expectancy.

    Tajima straddled the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries and is one of the few people who could recall a time before World War I. Two days after her 45th birthday, the United States dropped the first of two atomic bombs northeast of her home island.

    Her legacy is similarly expansive; she had nine children and 160 descendants, including great-great-great grandchildren, the Gerontology Research Group said.

    Tajima's secret to longevity was “eating delicious things and sleeping well,” the group said. She danced with her hands at the sound of a samisen, a traditional three-string instrument.

    Chiyo Miyako, also in Japan, has become the world's oldest person, according to the group. At 116 years and 355 days, she has about nine months to reach her countrywoman's mark of 117 years and 260 days.

    Miyako would not have to travel far to visit her male compatriot. Japan's Masazo Nonaka, at 112 years and 271 days old, was confirmed to be the world's oldest man by Guinness World Records this month. The organization had been set to recognize Tajima before she died, the AP reported.
    What is it about Japan that yields so many record holders?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    Doris Olive Netting & Guinness

    Ms. Netting is my new hero.

    100-Year-Old Woman Says a Daily Guinness Is the Secret to Her Longevity


    Bloomberg/Getty Images

    She began drinking the Irish stout as a way to get extra iron.

    MIKE POMRANZ May 11, 2018

    Back in the 1920s, the beer brand Guinness had a slogan that probably wouldn’t fly today: “Guinness Is Good for You” advertisements openly exclaimed. Though openly touting the health benefits of beer doesn’t happen as often as it used to, a 100-year-old English woman—who lived through the 1920s, by the way—still prescribes to that old mantra. She credits her longevity to drinking a Guinness every day since her 30s. That about 70 years of Guinness. Or to do the math, over 25,000 beers!

    Doris Olive Netting of Plymouth, England, is so committed to Guinness that she even themed her 100th birthday party after the well-known Irish stout, decorating her nursing home with things like branded balloons and a life-sized Guinness toucan logo. If you didn’t quite catch that, yes, Netting hasn’t let living in a care home slow down her beer habit. “She refuses to go a day without drinking it,” the centenarian’s 37-year-old granddaughter Tammy told the Independent.

    Apparently, Netting began drinking Guinness after seeing one of those aforementioned Guinness ads touting the beer’s iron content. “After the war there was a big marketing campaign to buy Guinness—drink Guinness to get your iron—following on from the ration years. So Olive did just that: a glass [mini bottle] of Guinness a day for the rest of her life,” Tammy further explained. “She reckons that's why she's lived for as long as she has, because of the iron intake through Guinness. She's doing really well. She's remarkable.”

    Like all Brits who reach 100 years of age are eligible for, Netting also had the honor of receiving a telegram from the Queen; however, she might have been more impressed with another well-wisher. After hearing of her devotion to their brews, Guinness sent her a personalized gift basket to mark the occasion. Hopefully, it contained at least a few bottles of Guinness, though knowing Olive as we now do, they won’t last long.
    THREADS
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    Beer...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,887
    https://youtu.be/xRbCHA5YTi8

    Shoot...I'm still unable to embed anymore...

  9. #69

    Hi Jim



    Dicks-

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,887
    Quote Originally Posted by boxerbilly View Post


    Dicks-
    Hi, Billy. Hope everything is going well for you.

    What is Dicks referring to?

  11. #71
    Im with the dicks ?

    Dicks sporting losers.

    My friend , Jimbo !

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    Grace “Amazing Grace” Jones

    Reminds me of Doris Olive Netting. I'm beginning to think these elderly people are just scamming free drinks. Which is super wise.


    112-year-old woman credits longevity to nightly dram of single malt whiskey

    Allison Shoemaker
    Yesterday 1:45pm
    Filed to:WHISKEY


    Photo: Marina113 (iStock)

    The oldest person in Great Britain celebrated her 112th birthday this week, and to mark the occasion, she gave away her secret to longevity: A dram of single malt whiskey, every night for the last sixty years.

    Grace “Amazing Grace” Jones, who was born in Liverpool in 1906, told the Daily Mail that she has a nightcap of Famous Grouse Single Malt Whiskey nightly, and has done so for 62 years. That means she began this tradition in 1956. One hopes she is being sent a large case of free Famous Grouse right now as thanks for the loyal patronage and great publicity.

    “I never miss my nightcap,” she told the paper:
    All I have is the whisky at night. Whisky is very good for you. I started having a nightly tot of it when I turned 50 so I’ve been having it every night for the last 60 years and I certainly have no intention of stopping now. My doctor said, ‘keep up with the whisky Grace, it’s good for your heart’.”
    THREADS:
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    Let's talk Whisky!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    Chinese grandpa works out every day as a LEOPARD

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    Andrew E. Slavonic

    101-YEAR-OLD VETERAN’S SECRET TO LONG LIFE IS A DAILY COORS LIGHT
    1 Minute Read
    Produced by Cat Wolinski / @beeraffair
    Updated on 2018-12-06


    Photo Credit: Coors Light / Facebook.com

    Andrew E. Slavonic of McMurray, Penn. turned 101 years old on December 1. His secret to the long, healthy life he continues to enjoy? A daily Coors Light at 4 p.m.

    According to Fox News, Slavonic has been drinking a Coors Light daily in the afternoon for the last 15 years. Before that, it was Coors — he’s been a fan of the brand since 1996.

    His son, Bob Slavonic, who lives with his father, says he introduced Andrew to the brand. “I think I am the one to blame for the switch because that is all that I have been drinking for about the past 25 years,” he told Fox News.


    Credit: wdrb.com

    Andrew is still “spry,” his son says, and keeps a regular schedule. He wakes at 8:30 a.m., makes his own breakfast and lunch, and reads the newspaper every day.

    And each afternoon, “around 4:00 p.m., he tells me that it is 4:00 p.m., and it is time for our beer,” Bob said. “He gets his Coors Light from the garage beer fridge and enjoys a nice cold one. The bluer the mountains are on the can, the better.”

    Andrew is a true American: He’s a WWII Air Force Veteran who served as a nose gunner and top turret gunner, along with training new pilots during the war.

    Bob reportedly reached out to MillerCoors about his father’s affection for the brew, but has not gotten a response.

    Published: December 6, 2018
    Daily Coors Light? Nah, I don't want to live to 101 that bad.

    THREADS:
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    Beer...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,487

    Jeanne Calment

    Here's a twist on this thread.

    The world’s oldest woman was 122 when she died. A researcher says she was lying about her age.
    By Eli Rosenberg January 5

    Jeanne Calment died in 1997 in the southern French town in which she was born, and her death drew a flurry of attention.

    At 122, an age that had been certified by the Guinness World Records as well as public health researchers, she was the oldest documented person to have lived.

    But a Russian mathematician is casting doubt on her record. Nikolay Zak said in a report that he believes Calment was actually Yvonne Calment, Jeanne’s daughter, who Zak says assumed her mother’s identity to avoid inheritance taxes in the 1930s. If true, Yvonne Calment would’ve been 99 if she died in 1997.

    The evidence produced by Zak in a paper published recently on the portal ResearchGate is not definitive.

    He points to studies that show Calment had lost less than an inch of her height by the time she was older than 100, significantly less height loss than what would have been expected; Yvonne was taller than Jeanne, he says. A passport for Jeanne in the 1930s lists different eye colors for her than she had later in life. He also raises questions about other physical discrepancies in her forehead and chin. He also claims Calment had destroyed photographs and other family documents when she had been requested to send them to the archives in Arles.

    The study has caused a global stir since it was issued. It has been covered by news media organizations around the world. Sample headline: “Jeanne Calment cheater?” France Inter radio asked.

    But it has been denounced by some scientists, including Jean-Marie Robine, who validated Calment’s age and wrote a book about her around the time of her death.

    “All of this is incredibly shaky and rests on nothing,” Robine told Le Parisien.

    According to Smithsonian magazine, Robine said Calment answered questions when he interviewed her that only she would have been able to answer, like the name of her math teacher and housekeepers in her building.

    “Her daughter couldn’t have known that,” he said, adding that town of Arles would have been in on the ruse.

    “Can you imagine how many people would have lied? Overnight, Fernand Calment [Jeanne’s husband] would have passed his daughter for his wife and everyone would have kept silent?” Robine said. “It is staggering.”

    Michel Vauzelle, who was the mayor of Arles when Calment died, has said the Russian’s theory is “completely impossible and ridiculous."

    Nicolas Brouard, research director at France’s National Institute of Demographic Studies, said some in the research community favor “exhuming the bodies of Jeanne and Yvonne Calment” because of Zak’s study, according to French public radio broadcaster RFI. He also said DNA testing could settle the debate.

    In an email, Zak told The Washington Post that he became convinced Calment’s age was suspicious in February while studying mortality patterns of people older then 105.

    He said he started to investigate her life in September.

    “I funded the work myself, it was a fascinating detective story in front of me,” he said. “Those who criticize my work heavily are those who have a huge conflict of interest or those who didn’t read it.”

    He called critics of his report “dishonest” and released a document that rebuts their rebuttals point by point.

    Still, he admitted to Reuters that he does not have “cast-iron proof.”

    “I reviewed the whole situation,” he said. “There are lots of small pieces of evidence.”

    Guinness World Records said it was aware of the report.

    “Extensive research is performed for every oldest person record title we verify, which is led by experts in the gerontology field, and they have been notified of the current situation,” it said in a statement distributed by spokeswoman Rachel Gluck.

    Robine did not respond to a request for comment.

    A Washington Post story about Calment’s 120th birthday describes the broad contours of her life. She was born in Arles, in the south of France, on Feb. 21, 1875, before the invention of the lightbulb. She married Fernand Calment at 21.

    “She dabbled in painting, played the piano in her parlor, rode her bicycle around town, hiked and hunted,” buoyed by the success of her husband’s fabric shop, reporter Dana Thomas wrote.

    She said she met Vincent van Gogh as a teacher when he came to Arles to paint in 1888, saying she found him “very ugly, ungracious, impolite, sick.”

    “Pardon me, but we called him ‘the madman.’” she said. She outlived much of her family. Yvonne died at 36 of pleurisy, Thomas wrote. Fernand died in 1942 at the age of 72 from eating tainted cherries. Calment’s only grandchild, Frederic, was killed in a car accident at 36 in 1963.

    Questions about age-related records are not uncommon. Shigechiyo Izumi of Japan was dubbed the world’s oldest man when he died in 1986 at what was believed to be 120 years old. But research that came out later claimed he was around 105. Others claiming ages as high as 125 and up have lacked the required documentation to prove their ages.

    The secrets of an exceptionally long life remain elusive. Obituaries about Calment noted that she was known for her love of chocolate — she reportedly ate two pounds a week — treated her skin with olive oil and rode a bicycle until she was 100. She had quit her two-cigarettes-a-day habit only a few years before her death — not for health, but because she could not longer light a cigarette without asking for help, The Washington Post wrote.

    Under an obscure French system called viager — when a buyer purchases a home from an older person and begins paying mortgage but is only able to move in after that person dies — Calment had a man paying her mortgage for more than 30 years, The Post reported. She had signed the deal with him when she was 90.

    Clarification: An earlier version of this report said that Nikolay Zak was part of the Moscow Center For Continuous Mathematical Education, due to information on the portal where he published his research. Zak says he has not been affiliated with the Center for many years. The story has been updated.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •