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  1. #61
    I believe the Chinese just called my cell phone. Number is- 212-695-4269
    Time stamp Sept. 12, 2018. 8:57 am. Must be Xi Jinping associates. Please be very careful people

  2. #62

    Tiffany loves this water dragon and picture best.


  3. #63

    Tiffany is the Pearl

    Held in Yo Kims hand.



    https://www.ancient.eu/Ryujin/

  4. #64

    All of us are with Tiffany !




    XOXOXOXOXOXOXO

  5. #65
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    Tebori

    Fading ink: Japan's 'hand-carved' tattoo masters fight to keep their art alive
    Updated 8th January 2019


    Artist Horimyo tattooing the shoulder of calligrapher Hayato Suzuki in Tokyo. Credit: YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

    Written by Oscar Holland, CNN Tokyo, Japan

    At a small, clinically-lit studio in Tokyo's Roppongi district, fearsome warriors and mythical creatures glare out from paper drawings lining the perimeter of the space.
    The tattooist here, who asked to be identified simply as Ryugen, specializes in traditional Japanese imagery -- colorful, cartoon-like forms inspired by nature, religious iconography and the country's famous "ukiyo-e" wood block prints.
    Ryugen's methods are also steeped in history. In fact, he is one of a small number of Japanese artists still practicing the ancient tradition of "tebori" (literally "hand-carved") tattoos.
    The first written records of tattoos in Japan are more than two millennia old, and the use of needle-tipped rods like Ryugen's can be traced back centuries. The tools of tebori may appear primitive compared to modern tattoo machines, but the principle was much the same: Artists used the rods to manually push ink beneath the top layers of skin, leaving a permanent mark for either decoration or punishment.


    Italian photographer Felice Beato captured Japanese men tattooed with hand-carved tattoos in the 1880s. Credit: Yokohama School

    Ryugen's instruments, which he keeps in a simple fabric pouch, differ little from these centuries-old tools, although he uses disposable needle tips for the sake of hygiene. Demonstrating his technique, he rests one of the rods along the crease of his thumb before moving it in a repetitive, vigorous action -- a sort of digging motion.
    Modern tattoo machines feature a depth setting, which helps the artist pierce the correct layers of skin, but tebori masters rely on feeling alone. Ryugen said the traditional method helps him to tattoo "intuitively," although he usually uses a tattoo gun to draw outlines.
    The benefit, he claimed, is that colors are brighter, stronger and longer-lasting. Manual methods also help him to create smoother gradations, from dull to strong colors, using only one ink.
    And while his technique may look brutish, Ryugen believes it's "way less painful" than the electronic equivalent. One of his clients, 34-year-old Ryota Sakai, agreed -- though he noted that traditional tattoos take longer, and therefore cost more (Ryugen, like most tattoo artists, charges by the hour).


    A man shows his traditional-style Japanese tattoos during the Sanja Matsuri festival in Tokyo. Over 1.5 million people flocked to Tokyo's Asakusa district during the three-day annual festival, which heralds the coming of summer in the Japanese capital. Credit: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

    Sakai has tebori tattoos on his arms and chest, as well as a three-eyed demon across his back. His motivation for choosing traditional methods was only partly to do with Ryugen's ability to express subtle shades.
    "From a young age, I was interested in history." he said a phone interview. "And I particularly like the Edo period, which was when these tattoo design was developed.
    "I'm not religious, but I like the designs of Buddhism, the Edo period and samurai."

    Tradition under threat

    Ryugen is as much a craftsman as an artist. Like many tradespeople in Japan, his career began with a lengthy apprenticeship.
    After shadowing his master for a year, Ryugen went professional and began accompanying him on visits to clients from Japan's mafia, the Yakuza. It would take another seven years of study before he felt ready to open his own studio in the early 2000s.
    "It takes a longer time to master than (using a tattoo) machine," he said. "I think it is because there are many parameters, such as angle, speed, strength, timing and intervals between 'pokes.' You need to control all of them."
    His craft appears to be one under threat. Although social attitudes toward tattoos have loosened in recent decades, Ryugen said that interest in tebori tattoos is limited. He estimates that 70% of clients are foreigners, and even his apprentice is American.


    Japanese tattooist Horiyoshii III tattoos a flower on the back of a woman. Horiyoshii III is a tattoo artist renowned for his full body designs, which can take many sessions over many years to complete. Credit: TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

    "Most Japanese (people) don't care about how it's done -- whether by machine or tebori," he said. "It's more to do with the design or artist's skill."
    Japanese people are also less interested in traditional styles, according to Mieko Yamada, a sociology professor at Purdue University Fort Wayne who has studied Japanese body art.
    "Laypeople -- students, or office workers -- prefer to have a contemporary Westernized styles, and at a smaller scale," she said in a phone interview, referring to the Japanese tradition of covering large portions of the body in tattoos.
    But there's another threat to Ryugen's profession: the law. Tattoo artists have existed in a legal gray area since 2001, when Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare decreed that any action that involves putting "pigment on a needle tip and inserting ink into the skin" should be considered a medical procedure.
    Without medical degrees, practically every tattooist the country suddenly found themselves operating illegally. Crackdowns have since occurred, with fines of up to 300,000 yen ($2,600) reportedly handed out to transgressors.
    Tattoo studios are, nonetheless, widely tolerated. Ryugen is easy to find online, although his studio is appointment-only and, from the outside, no different from any other apartment. He called for a pragmatic solution to the industry's precarious status.
    "We need rules around tattoos (but why not) a licensing system, like in America or Europe?"

    Ongoing taboos

    Japan has a complex and troubled relationship with tattoos. But despite the long history of tattooing in the country, it wasn't until the middle of the 18th century that pictorial themes emerged -- ones still used by tattooists today, such as theater masks and religious figures.


    "Unity of Three Happinesses: Favorite Actors Before a White Waterfall" (1863) by Toyohara Kunichika Credit: Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

    Body art became increasingly popular among the lower classes until 1868, when tattoos were outlawed by the new government, which, in its drive for modernization, made efforts to banish practices that might be viewed as primitive by outsiders.
    The ban was lifted after World War II. But tattoos are still considered taboo, having grown to be associated with organized crime. (When Ryugen was younger, around half of his clients were from the Yakuza, though he now refuses to work with the mafia.)
    "People in Japan nowadays seem to be more tolerant towards people with tattoos because of musicians, basketball players -- professionals who have tattoos," Yamada said. "But if people have any visible tattoo they can be really afraid of getting fired from their job. So they tend to hide them."
    To this day, many public baths and gyms in Japan forbid visible tattoos. Yet, while this conservatism applies to all forms of tattoo, Ryugen believes that hygiene concerns attach additional stigma to the antiquated tebori method.
    "The way I do it is the same as a machine," he said. "The needles are disposable and I wear gloves. But people think that tebori is dirty, or not safe, because it's very primitive."
    For now, the best he can do is raise awareness of his industry's plight. On a ledge in his studio, a small box containing a handful of coins calls for donations alongside the simple message: "Save tattooing in Japan."
    Tebori is badass.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #66
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    Japanese BBQ grill Ariana

    Always proofread especially with tattoos.

    Ariana Grande’s kanji tattoo fail: new ink reads “Japanese BBQ grill” instead of “7 Rings”
    Oona McGee 2 hours ago



    The American popstar says there’s a story behind her embarrassing tattoo mistake.

    Earlier this month, Ariana Grande’s love of tattoos made news when it was revealed she’d gotten Pokemon’s Eevee inked onto her bicep. Today, fans around the world are talking about the relationship between Grande’s tattoos and Asian characters again, but this time it’s in a whole different context.

    The characters we’re talking about today are two kanji ones that the American singer-songwriter recently got inked into her upper palm. The new markings are a meaningful homage to her new single “7 Rings”, which is currently at the top of music charts in a number of different countries.

    ▼ “7 Rings” is all about the rings she bought her seven friends on the day she returned her engagement ring to former fiancee Pete Davidson.



    The title of the new single is correctly translated into Japanese as “七つの指輪” (“nanatsu no yubiwa“) in the official music video.



    The appearance of Japanese in the clip is Grande’s hat-tip to Japan, a country that’s been close to her heart since she sang with Japanese YouTuber Hikakin back in 2014. With so much meaning behind the title of her new single, it’s easy to see why the singer was inspired to ink her body with the words “7 Rings” in Japanese. However, this is what she wound up with.



    *amo*
    @hey__amo
    Ariana Grande’s new tattoo “七輪” means Japanese style bbq grill, not 7 rings. 😭 If you want to know about 七輪, just google “SHICHIRIN”

    37.7K
    7:08 PM - Jan 29, 2019
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    Instead of writing out the whole thing, she chose to use only the first kanji (七), which translates to “seven”, and the last one (輪) which is read as “wheel”, “hoop,” “ring”, or “circle”. However, when the two kanji are combined, they don’t read “7 Rings”. They read “shichirin”, which is a small charcoal grill.

    ▼ In Japan, shichirin are used to barbecue things like fish.


    The singer was inundated with comments drawing attention to her embarrassing tattoo fail, prompting the 25-year-old to delete the original photo of it from her Instagram account. However, when the image popped up on Twitter with more comments about her “charcoal grill” tattoo, Grande replied with a tweet that read:

    “indeed, i left out “つの指” which should have gone in between. it hurt like f*** n still looks tight i wouldn’t have lasted one more symbol lmao. but this spot also peels a ton and won’t last so if i miss it enough, i’ll suffer thru the whole thing next time.”

    The tweet was deleted hours later, but fans and news outlets aren’t letting her forget about the mistake, bringing her even more pain than the tattoo itself.

    Still, given Grande’s knowledge of the Japanese language, which she’s studied herself, you’d think she would’ve been able to avoid the blunder. It could’ve been worse, though – she could’ve ended up with “chicken noodle soup” inked on her for eternity.

    Source: Twitter/@hey__amo
    Featured image: YouTube/Arianna Grande
    Insert images: YouTube/Arianna Grande, Wikipedia/DryPot
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #67
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    thank you next

    Ariana Grande “fixes” her 7 Rings Japanese kanji tattoo, but it still says tiny charcoal grill
    Oona McGee 5 hours ago

    Throwing another kanji character into the mix doesn’t exactly fix the mistake.

    American singer-songwriter Ariana Grande is currently at the top of the music charts in a number of different countries for her new single “7 Rings”. Inspired by the day she bought rings for her seven friends after returning her engagement ring to ex-fiancee Pete Davidson, it’s a song that’s so close to Grande’s heart she decided to get a tattoo in its honour.

    Instead of saying “七つの指輪” (“nanatsu no yubiwa” or “7 Rings”), as it does in the official music video, though, Grande opted to leave out the three middle characters, leaving her with a tattoo that read “七輪” (“shichirin”) which, when read separately, translate to “7” and “wheel/circle”, but together, as she has it, they mean “Japanese charcoal grill”.

    After posting a photo of her new ink on Instagram, fans pounced on her for the error, prompting Grande to delete the photo. However, it hadn’t completely disappeared from the Internet, as it soon popped up on Twitter, with side-by-side photos showing Grande’s tattoo alongside a shichirin.



    *amo*
    @hey__amo
    Ariana Grande’s new tattoo “七輪” means Japanese style bbq grill, not 7 rings. 😭 If you want to know about 七輪, just google “SHICHIRIN”

    37.7K
    7:08 PM - Jan 29, 2019
    14.1K people are talking about this
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    Grande hit back with a reply that read:

    “indeed, i left out “つの指” which should have gone in between. it hurt like f*** n still looks tight i wouldn’t have lasted one more symbol lmao. but this spot also peels a ton and won’t last so if i miss it enough, i’ll suffer thru the whole thing next time.”

    Despite seeming unbothered by the tattoo fail, it looks like everyone’s comments did get under the 25-year-old’s skin in the end, as she took to Instagram to post this image on her Insta story today.

    View image on Twitter


    Oona McGee 🇯🇵🇮🇪🇦🇺
    @OonaMcGee
    Ariana Grande says “RIP tiny charcoal grill”.#ArianaGrande #七輪 #七指輪

    14
    12:12 AM - Jan 31, 2019
    See Oona McGee 🇯🇵🇮🇪🇦🇺's other Tweets
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    Alongside the image is a message from Grande which says:

    “Slightly better. Thanks to my tutor for helping me fix and @kanenavasard for being a legend. And to my doctor for the lidocaine shots (no joke). RIP tiny charcoal grill. Miss u man. I actually really liked u.”

    Well, in all fairness, it is slightly better, but only because the new characters she’s added distract the eye away from “shichirin” and cause confusion as you try to work out what’s going on. She hasn’t really said RIP to her tiny charcoal grill, either, as it’s still there in plain sight. Now though, instead of saying “tiny charcoal grill”, her new tattoo reads as:

    “Charcoal BBQ Grill
    Finger ♡”

    It’s as confusing in English as it is in Japanese. Grande’s tutor – who probably wished she’d been consulted before the original tattoo session – was faced with a pretty impossible task when asked to fix the kanji to have it read closer to “7 Rings” rather than “shichirin”.

    While the best solution would’ve been to get it lasered off and redone correctly on her other hand, they chose to go another route, instead adding “指” beneath the “七輪”. On its own, “指” means “finger”, but when combined with “輪” it reads as “指輪” which means “ring”.

    However, given the position of the new kanji, it reads as “Shichirin Yubi” or “Charcoal Grill Finger” rather than “7 Rings”. Japanese can be read from right to left, so doing that gives us “wheel/circle”, “seven”, “♡”, “finger”. And if we read it in the traditional style of top to bottom, right to left, it reads “wheel/circle”, “♡”, “seven”, “finger”.

    Confused? Exactly. The only way it could be read as something similar to “7 Rings” is if we read it from top to bottom, left to right. That gives us “7”, “ring” and “♡”. The only problem is that neither English nor Japanese is read in that order.

    So, although she has all the necessary kanji components on her palm, they’re all laid out in a mixed up, confusing, nonsensical jumble. Plus, she’s still missing the “つの” hiragana in the middle of it all, which connects the 7 to the rings as a counter for them. Without those in between it all, it still reads “charcoal grill”.

    Source: Instagram/ArianaGrande
    Featured image: Twitter/@oonamcgee
    You'd think with all of the bank Ariana is pulling down, she might afford a better tutor.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #68
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    No minor tats in Shanghai

    Shanghai Restricts Minors From Getting Tattoos, National Ban May Follow
    Shanghai’s new tattoo regulation comes as part of a series of amendments to municipal regulations aimed at protecting underage citizens
    By BEATRICE TAMAGNO 1 day ago
    Home > Daily Drip > Shanghai Restricts Minors From Getting Tattoos, National Ban May Follow
    From March 1, minors are no longer allowed to get tattooed legally in Shanghai without their parents’ approval. In implementing the ban, the city has become the first in China to set a minimum legal age for those wanting to get inked.

    However, a nationwide ban is under discussion.

    During the ongoing political event known as the Two Sessions, where China’s political elites meet and discuss regulations, a representative named Ma Qi called for expanding the tattoo ban for minors across the country.

    To put this in context: Most Western countries set the age limit for getting a tattoo at 18 or 16 (with parental consent). The minimum age to get a tattoo in China’s East Asia neighbor South Korea is also 18 (although the nation has a bizarre law stating that only medical professionals can work as tattoo artists).

    Shanghai’s new tattoo regulation comes as part of a series of amendments to municipal regulations aimed at protecting underage citizens, such as prohibiting minors from plastic surgery, which is becoming alarmingly popular in the country.


    A tattoo parlor in the touristic area Tianzifang in Shanghai

    For some Shanghai-based tattoo artists, like X-Ink, the tattoo ban for minors will have little effect on how they operate their business.

    “Even though there was no regulation before, if a minor came to my shop, I would directly say no and tell them to come back in a couple of years,” he said.

    According to X-Ink, youth tattoos are a more serious problem in smaller cities, where safety standards are lower and cultural awareness around tattoos is weak.

    He referred to a case in 2019 where a couple living in a county-level city in Zhejiang province successfully sued a tattoo parlor after their son was suspended from school due to his body art.

    X-Ink tells RADII he supports the new regulation in Shanghai:

    “I think tattoos need to be regulated. Preventing minors from getting tattoos is common abroad; I already carry on my practice and supply my materials according to international standards.”

    Many Chinese netizens seem to share his opinion. A hashtag related to the new law went viral on Weibo and had accumulated more than 270 million views at the time of writing.

    One user commented, “I would set the age limit at 20,” while another wrote under the same post, “Minors shouldn’t get tattoos, but tattoos also shouldn’t lead to stigmatization!”

    While tattoos are gaining popularity among Chinese youth, many still associate them with criminality and think that people with body art may face obstacles when looking for a job.

    The Chinese government has paid increasing attention to tattoos in the past few years. Public figures such as athletes and artists have been asked to “set a good example,” with authorities calling for tattoos to be covered at music festivals and preventing actors with tattoos from appearing on TV.

    In December 2021, China’s General Administration of Sport banned soccer players from getting new tattoos and asked them to consider removing pre-existing ones.

    All images via Unsplash
    China has an interesting relationship with tattoos. I remember seeing a lot of homemade tats in the country around Shaolin. They looked like prison tats.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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