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Thread: Kung Fu Stewardesses

  1. #61
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    Slightly OT



    This vid is a year old but it comes via a more recent article that is copy&paste protected - see Vietnam's Bikini Airline Set To Create Country's First Female Billionaire.

    Gene Ching
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  2. #62
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    From China Plus News, a facebook platform of CRI English

    China Plus News
    April 9 at 10:55pm ·
    "Girls need Kungfu to protect ourselves!"
    Hundreds of female aspiring flight attendants are learning self-defense skills with Wing Chun Kungfu Masters in Sichuan.
    The participants, most of whom are millennials, said they want to be able to defend themselves if confronted with attackers.
    The move comes after a young woman was attacked and nearly abducted by a male stranger in the hallway of a Yitel hotel in Beijing last Sunday. A hotel staff was present at the scene but failed to stop the attacker.
    The victim was later saved by another guest who stepped in and forced the man to retreat.
    The young victim then uploaded the surveillance footage on her Weibo account, sparking public outrage regarding the incident.
    Many young women in China have chosen to take up self defense in the wake of the event.








    So are halter tops and daisy dukes official female Wing Chun uniforms?
    Gene Ching
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  3. #63
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    Slightly OT

    It's Sambo, not Kung Fu. But still...

    Russian low-cost airline will teach employees self-defense
    March 7, 2017 RBTH
    The airlines said it needs to protect employees against increasingly aggressive passengers, and self-defense training is the most effective and inexpensive method.


    Flight attendants of a Pobeda Airlines aircraft

    Pobeda Airlines has hired an expert to teach employees the martial arts of sambo and judo. Source: Sergey Pivovarov/RIA Novosti
    Russian budget airline, Pobeda (Victory), has hired an expert to teach employees the martial arts of sambo and judo, said Andrey Kalmykov, the budget airline’s general director, RBK Daily reports.

    Earlier, the company announced it was planning to hire private security guards to protect employees against aggressive passengers, which would result in a hike in the price of tickets.

    “We found a cheaper way to do it, and we’re going to teach our staff the martial arts of sambo and judo, and therefore, we won’t need to raise ticket prices,” he said.

    He pointed out that hiring a private security firm to protect workers at airport counters and inside planes would increase ticket prices by two percent. Therefore, the airline decided not to go ahead with this idea, which was originally announced in mid February, Kalmykov added.

    Pobeda decided to strengthen security measures after a Feb. 10 incident at Vnukovo airport, when a passenger who missed his flight attacked the local company manager. The client, according to the airlines, demanded a ticket refund, but when he was refused he spat in the face of the airline employee and hit him on the head several times.

    After the incident, Vasily Shestakov of the International Sambo Federation (FIAS) offered to train the staff of all airlines in sambo, which is more convenient than other types of martial arts due to the cabin’s limited space, Shestakov said.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #64
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    Slightly OT

    Hi Mr. Chan (Hong Kong Airlines — Traveling with Jackie Chan )

    Gene Ching
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  5. #65
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    Hong Kong Airlines — Traveling with Jackie Chan (2017)

    Gene Ching
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  6. #66
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    Slightly OT

    More on VietJet.

    Has anyone here every flown VietJet?

    Gene Ching
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  7. #67
    Use a stun gun or taser

    With a group tactic

    3 against 1 etc

    Wow beauties showing skins

    no can defend.


  8. #68
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    Slightly OT

    More on VietJet - does it need its own indie thread now? Perhaps...

    2 days ago
    Airline sparks outrage after scantily-clad models put on show
    By Kathleen Joyce | Fox News


    Models dressed in scantily-clad clothing put on an in-flight performance for Vietnam's under-23 soccer team Sunday, Jan. 28, 2018. (Vietjet)

    A low-budget Vietnamese airline was fined Tuesday by aviation officials after scantily-clad models put on a sexy show for the country’s under-23 soccer team.

    Last Sunday, the team was returning from China after losing to Uzbekistan in the Asian Cup but was celebrated with an in-flight lingerie show on a Vietjet Air plane, Reuters reported.


    The low-budget airline was fined Tuesday after an in-flight lingerie show. (Airbus)

    Pictures of the players with the models went viral online, drawing widespread scrutiny from social media users.

    “Who let these escaped chimpanzees on the plane welcome home the under-23 team?” somebody wrote on Facebook.

    The Vietnamese airline has been in hot water before for making flight attendants wear sexy clothing during a flight, and for risqué advertising.


    Vietjet has come under scrutiny previously for risque advertisement and making flight attendants wear bikinis. (Vietjet)

    The airline’s president Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao, who is also the country's first female billionaire, apologized in a statement on the company’s Facebook page and wrote that the show was unplanned.


    Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao, the president of VietJet, apologized for the performance. (Reuters)

    “This was an improvised performance by the logistics team that was not part of the company’s program,” Thao wrote.

    However, Lai Thanh, one of the show’s models, told Reuters Vietjet representatives told her to “grab a photo with the players.”

    The Civil Aviation Authority of Vietnam fined the airline $1,761 and Vietjet’s “chief stewardess” $175 for the performance, Reuters reported.


    The airline was fined after scantily-clad models put on a show for Vietnam's under-23 soccer team. (Viejet)

    “Despite the fact the Vietjet event didn’t jeopardize the safety of the flight, it could still have posed a safety risk,” the Civil Aviation Authority of Vietnam said in a statement.

    The New York Post reported social media users asking if the show “perked up the guys.”

    “If it did, then the work the girls put into getting all dolled up was worth it for them,” a person wrote.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #69
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    Not Kung Fu...

    ...but relevant.

    Flight attendants train in self-defense amid spike in unruly passengers
    BY GREGORY WALLACE AND PETE MUNTEAN, CNN
    UPDATED 20 HRS AGO | POSTED ON JUL 28, 2021 0

    (CNN) -- "Help!" yelled a flight attendant as she grabbed a knife-wielding man and wrestled to pin the knife against her hip. "I need help!"

    Then the struggle stopped. "Alright, let's do it again," the instructor said. "Reset!"

    The knife was made of rubber. The man was a fellow flight attendant. They struggled not in a life-or-death brawl inside a cramped airplane cabin, but instead practiced at a padded gymnasium with their federal air marshal instructors.

    The eight flight attendants in this Miami-area class were among hundreds the Transportation Security Administration plans to train this summer and fall in self-defense skills. It is restarting the half-day course first developed in 2004 that was recently put on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic.


    Flight attendants train at a gym in Florida.
    CNN

    The skills include how to strike, stomp and subdue a violent attacker -- a scenario these flight attendants said they hope to never encounter.

    Amid the return to air travel this year, the number of unruly and violent passengers is spiking. More than 100 incidents were reported to the Federal Aviation Administration in the last week -- for a total of more than 3,600 so far this year.

    Flight attendants are taught a set of de-escalation techniques to handle difficult passengers -- the ones who won't stow a tray table or who insist an oversize suitcase fit in the bin last time.

    But they say the defiance and violence that accompanies this return to travel is testing those skills.

    "You get on a plane full of people and some of them are not very happy and you just never know what's going to happen," said Carrie, a flight attendant who took the class as she returns to work after a pandemic-related leave of absence.

    "It's just more imperative that we take care of ourselves and take care of our passengers because people are anxious, and they're upset, and they're frustrated, and sometimes that comes out inappropriately," she said. (Carrie asked CNN not publish her last name because she was not authorized by her airline to speak publicly.)

    Learning last-resort tactics

    Instructors taught a range of skills, from a defensive stance to blows that can be delivered on a would-be hijacker desperate to commandeer the plane.

    One instructor used a mannequin to demonstrate a last-resort method of going at an attacker's eyes.

    "You are going to possibly die. You need to defend yourself at all costs," he said. (CNN agreed to not identify the instructors because they are active-duty federal air marshals whose work on aircraft is done undercover.)

    Most encounters will never rise to that level. But Federal Aviation Administration summaries of more than 40 onboard incidents in recent months show the brazen dissent flight attendants are tasked with addressing.

    In one instance, the FAA said a passenger "tried to open the cockpit door, repeatedly refused to comply with crew members' instructions, and physically assaulted a flight attendant by striking him in the face and pushing him to the floor." After crewmembers restrained the passenger in plastic handcuffs, he "freed himself from one of the handcuffs and struck the flight attendant in the face a second time." The passenger was not named in the report.

    In another instance, the union representing Southwest Airlines flight attendants said a passenger's punch knocked out two of a flight attendant's teeth.

    About three-quarters of the incidents reported involve passengers violating or repeatedly defying the federal requirement to wear a face mask when onboard a plane. Another common theme is alcohol -- so much so that many airlines have withheld alcohol service on flights.

    'I don't ever want to use any of this'

    Sara Nelson, international president of the Association of Flight Attendants, said a small set of passengers are "treating flight attendants as punching bags, and they're doing that verbally and physically."

    "We are finding that our jobs are harder than ever," Nelson said. "Conflict is rising very quickly. When we can't get to that and diffuse that because we have so much going on ... problems can become big very quickly."

    Back at the training, Donna O'Neil was practicing an elbow strike that she could use if a violent passenger charges her in the aisle or galley from behind. She has 47 years of experience and said she is "pretty good at calming things down."

    "I don't ever want to use any of this," O'Neil said after the training. "But if I had to, I certainly feel much more confident."

    An air marshal supervisor, Noel Curtin, walked in to watch some of the training, and said he hopes crew members walk away with that type of confidence.

    "We're not omnipresent, so it's important to have crew members able to deal with individual incidents on the aircraft," Curtin said later in his office.

    "There's no backup at 30,000 feet."

    The-CNN-Wire
    Gene Ching
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