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Thread: Kung Fu Stewardesses

  1. #46
    http://instagr.am/p/J0IwYuSOWV/

    Let me put it this way.

    I luv to listen to lady gaga sing.

    But I do not trust her with the power tool.

    I luv to take food and drinks from stewardesses.

    But I do not trust them to tackle a villain. Wing Chun or Ba Gua is not the issue.

    Last edited by SPJ; 04-24-2012 at 07:50 PM.

  2. #47
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    “kong nu zu”, or “air rage tribe”

    Air Rage Tribe is a great name for a metal band.

    `Air rage tribe’: Chinese cabin crew learn kung fu as mobs of ‘unstable’ passengers attack staff over flight delays
    Malcolm Moore, The Telegraph | 13/07/28 | Last Updated: 13/07/28 6:05 PM ET



    China has spent billions on building some of the largest and most modern airports in the world, but, much to everyone’s embarrassment, it seems unable to get planes to fly between them on time.

    Violent attacks have erupted at airports across China, with passengers venting their rage on hapless staff over a summer of grinding delays.

    China has spent billions on building some of the largest and most modern airports in the world, but, much to everyone’s embarrassment, it seems unable to get planes to fly between them on time.

    Last month, only 18 per cent of the 22,000 flights out of Beijing’s Capital airport departed on schedule, according to the aviation research company FlightStats, making it the world’s worst major airport for punctuality. Not one Chinese airport managed to get even half of its flights to leave on time.

    The delays have seen mobs of angry passengers mount at least eight large protests at departure gates in the past two months, during two of which staff were attacked. There is even a new Chinese phrase for the rampaging hordes: the “kong nu zu”, or “air rage tribe”.

    On Thursday July 18, more than 30 passengers broke through security and stormed the runway at Nanchang airport after being delayed for seven hours by bad weather.

    The weekend before, passengers in Shanghai tried to rip off an attendant’s name badge before hitting her. In the subsequent fracas, two airport staff were injured and three passengers arrested. “The passengers were very emotional and unstable,” Ni Xuying, one of the injured employees, told state television.

    At the end of June, a primary school teacher lost control when her flight from Wenzhou to Beijing was cancelled, slapping and kicking an Air China attendant to the ground. “I waited there for such a long time. Nobody served me a bottle of water or a piece of cake or anything,” Liu Weiwei said in her defence.

    In March, Graham Fewkes, a British businessman based in Hong Kong, told the South China Morning Post he had witnessed cheers when a passenger assaulted a stewardess on a delayed flight to the island of Sanya.

    “The other passengers were applauding as the man was hitting her,” he said.

    Hong Kong Airlines last year said it had an average of three incidents involving disruptive passengers every week and has introduced training in wing chun, a form of kung fu, for its cabin crew.

    The situation at China’s airports is now so volatile that staff have been told not to announce any major delays.

    The problems have been caused by a sudden surge in air traffic, flowing into skies that are tightly controlled by the People’s Liberation Army. With only a few permitted routes, issues such as bad weather often force airlines to hold back flights rather than divert them.

    The heavy delays are exacting an economic cost. Marco Pearman-Parish at Corporation China, a consultancy that helps companies establish a presence in China, said some 60 per cent of his clients at a recent meeting were considering moving their operations away from Beijing because of the constant problems at the airport. “The delays are making it impossible to do business,” he said.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #48
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    More on Hong Kong Airlines

    HK Airlines continues to milk this marketing (some pix are reused in the source article). There's a CCTV vid here that's worth watching - follow the link.
    Flight crew uses martial arts on rowdy passengers
    CNTV, September 10, 2013

    You might think flight attendants have a glamorous life. But that's not always the case, especially when it comes to dealing with rowdy and uncooperative passengers. Now, one airline in Hong Kong is giving all its cabin staff training in Wing Chun, a form of Kung Fu, to improve their skills in dealing with the unexpected.

    One airline in Hong Kong is giving all its cabin staff training in Wing Chun, a form of Kung Fu, to improve their skills in dealing with the unexpected.

    Power and stealth....

    These are not the practised disciples of a renowned kung fu master.... they're new recruits for Hong Kong Airlines.

    Before they become flight attendants, they must complete 6 hours of training in Wing Chun, a form of Kung Fu.

    For many, it's their first time trying to learn the secrets of the ancient martial art.

    Wing Chun Kung Fu was popularized by actor Bruce Lee. One of its most influential practitioners of the 20th Century was Yip Man - a Kung Fu style that's adaptable and practical, and appeals to people of any age, gender and body type.

    "Wing Chun can be practised in a very small space. So it's suitable to be used inside an aircraft. You don't have to take any steps, you can stand still to defend yourself. "

    Many of the flight attendants support the training and say it will be helpful in their work.

    "Definitely it will be very useful for my work in the future, but hopefully I will not use it. It there's an accident, I will use. It will be very helpful," said Chan Yoen Hei, flight attendant & Wing Chun trainee.

    There's been an upsurge in violent incidents on flights between the mainland and Hong Kong in recent months.

    Hong Kong Airlines says staff experience on average three attacks a week from passengers.

    Kung Fu training is widely seen as a way of responding to this "air rage". Many believe it will make angry travelers think twice about resorting to violence.

    But the airline says the training is just aimed at cultivating a strong mind and keeping fit.

    "It's unlikely that passengers will get to see these attendants apply Wing Chun moves on lights. But the self-defence skills will at least give them more confidence to deal with emergencies."



    One airline in Hong Kong is giving all its cabin staff training in Wing Chun, a form of Kung Fu, to improve their skills in dealing with the unexpected.
    Woah, 6 whole hours of Wing Chun! Those stewardesses will be invincible!
    Gene Ching
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  4. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Woah, 6 whole hours of Wing Chun! Those stewardesses will be invincible!
    Great! Now we're going to have a bunch of uppity stewardesses on the forum arguing how their airline is the best....
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

  5. #50
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    Dude, that would be so awesome!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kellen Bassette View Post
    Great! Now we're going to have a bunch of uppity stewardesses on the forum arguing how their airline is the best....
    Just ask them for an extra bag of peanuts. That'll distract them.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #51
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    Still trending...

    ...it made the UPI

    Airline teaches flight attendants kung fu to deal with airport brawls
    As widespread flight delays in China have led to airport brawls and near-riots, flight attendants learn kung fu.
    Published: Sept. 16, 2013 at 11:19 AM
    By KRISTEN BUTLER, UPI.com | Blog

    During the month of July, only 17.8 percent of flights departing from Beijing were on time, according to FlightStats. In August, on-time departures rose to a still-dismal 28.8 percent.

    Between May and August, state media reported 26 brawls at Chinese airports as delays trigger "near-riots."

    Passengers have been delayed even for short domestic flights by 18 hours in some cases, and the gridlock is causing a lot of strife.

    In July, passengers beat up airport staff in three separate incidents at Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport. Some staff required hospitalization. The following weekend, 30 passengers stormed a runway after a seven-hour delay in Nanchang, in Jiangxi province.

    Since 2003, airline passengers in China nearly quadrupled to 319 million in 2012. Exploding economic growth hasn't been matched by infrastructure growth, leading to airspace as backed up as China's highways.

    Further, some 80 percent of China's airspace is controlled by the People's Liberation Army -- compared with just 17 percent federally-controlled airspace in the U.S. -- making it difficult for commercial flights to get clearance.

    Until China constructs its planned 55 new airports, however, irate passengers continue to snap inside airport terminals.

    In response, one Hong Kong airline is teaching its flight attendants kung fu.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #52
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    ttt 4 2014

    Photos: Kungfu Flight Attendants Train for Terror
    China Daily | Jun. 18, 2014
    Stewardesses-to-be practice the basics of the Ving Tsun, a form of self-defense, in Chengdu city, Southwest Sichuan province on Monday. Ving Tsun, or Wing Chun, a concept-based Chinese martial art, has been set as a compulsory course in Sichuan Southwest Vocational College of Civil Aviation. The college has signed a contract with the Tu Tengyao Martial Art Association to develop the course called "Eighteen combat movements of anti-terror in civil aviation." Ving Tsun is a system of striking and grappling, especially used for close-range combat.


    Stewardesses-to-be practice the basics of the Ving Tsun, a form of self-defense, in Chengdu city, Southwest Sichuan province on Monday. Ving Tsun, or Wing Chun, a concept-based Chinese martial art, has been set as a compulsory course in Sichuan Southwest Vocational College of Civil Aviation. The college has signed a contract with the Tu Tengyao Martial Art Association to develop the course called "Eighteen combat movements of anti-terror in civil aviation." Ving Tsun is a system of striking and grappling, especially used for close-range combat. [Photo/IC]
    more pix if you follow the link...
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  8. #53
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    The Chengdu Aviation Training Institute

    The 'gentle art of Chinese culture'. Oh yeah.

    Kung-Fu flight attendants: Chinese stewardesses practise hand-to-hand combat in grueling training academy where they are taught to be elegant, professional... and deadly

    Chinese flight attendants practise hand-to-hand combat and grueling exercises
    Images show intense training regime at the Chengdu Aviation Training Institute
    Recruits are taught 'the gentle art of Chinese culture and counter-terrorism'
    Bizarre graduation ceremony requires trainees to break plate in single blow

    By Jay Akbar and Edward Chow For Mailonline
    Published: 11:20 EST, 28 April 2015 | Updated: 13:33 EST, 28 April 2015

    These Chinese flight attendants are just capable of looking after an airsick passenger as they are in deadly hand-to-hand combat.

    Incredible images from the Chengdu Aviation Training Institute show young men and women attacking each other with sharp daggers, crawling through muddy pits and ejecting a passenger from a mock-airplane.

    They are taught to be elegant and professional in the air, while having the ability to subdue troublesome passengers.

    An instructor at the academy said they want recruits to understand the 'gentle art of Chinese culture' and have strong counter-terrorism skills, according the People's Daily Online.


    Deadly: Flight attendants practise hand-to-hand combat at the Chengdu Aviation Training Institute (pictured)


    Tough: The air stewardesses are made to crawl through muddy pits (pictured) and traverse flowing rivers in the grueling training regime


    Security: The recruits are taught to be professional in the air, but also trained to subdue troublesome passengers in mock-scenarios (pictured)


    Grueling: An instructor at the grueling academy said the trainees (pictured) are taught the 'gentle arts of Chinese culture' but also to have very strong physiques


    Show of strength: One of the requirements at the school's bizarre graduation ceremony requires the prospective stewardesses to break a plate with a single blow (pictured)

    And to graduate from the unorthodox academy, they must be able to smash a plate with a single strike.

    The rigorous training takes place in a variety of tough environments including muddy trenches and fast-flowing rivers.

    One of the school's instructors said: 'From the start our school has always provided military training, Taekwondo and other special courses.

    'We want to train our students to not only learn the gentle arts of Chinese culture but also to have a strong physique and be able to have a counter-terrorism and rapid reaction capability.'

    China-based Hong Kong Airlines introduced Kung-Fu training for their staff after a series of attacks on air stewards in 2013.

    The airline said they would teach their cabin crew a form of martial arts called wing-chun after claiming they experienced three attacks a week on average.

    More than 30 passengers stormed security and ran onto the runway on July 18, 2013 after bad weather caused seven hours of delays.

    In another incident, two airport staff were injured when a passenger attempted to rip off an attendant's name badge.


    Dangerous: The stewardesses at the Chengdou academy build strong physiques by performing impressive high-kicks (pictured)


    Brutal: Their brutal regime takes place in flowing rivers and muddy pits, where they practise submersion (pictured)


    Training: The recruits are put through their paces by being made to do extensive physical training which includes stretching in grueling stress-positions (pictured)


    Combat: The training results in a fleet of air stewardess who are elegant, professional and very dangerous
    Gene Ching
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  9. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    The 'gentle art of Chinese culture'. Oh yeah.
    Our world is just F!@#ed. LOL.


    Oh well, at least we can feel safe until someone figures out how to bypass that stuff.

  10. #55
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    slightly OT

    I was just amused by the 'fashion' especially the dude's suit at the bottom. Even his shoes match.

    Aviation college graduates celebrate by holding Cannes-style red carpet event



    Students at an aviation college in Chengdu celebrated their graduation the only way they know how, by throwing a mock Cannes Film Festival red carpet event, complete with luxury cars and designer dresses.



    According to Tencent, female graduates were driven to the event, held on May 4, in a convoy of Porches and Maseratis.



    After emerging from their vehicles, some in rather revealing dresses, the girls were escorted down the red carpet by the equally well attired boys.



    No mock film festival would be complete without an obligatory interview of the aspiring celebrities.



    Last summer, the School of Journalism at Shanghai's Fudan University pulled off an equally spectacular graduation ceremony, with students voting for selected representatives of their faculty to get the red carpet treatment.

    By Dominic Jackson

    [Images via Tencent]
    Gene Ching
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  11. #56
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    Slightly OT

    ...but I bet her Kung Fu skillz made her an expert crab cracker...

    Look: Stewardess quits job to offer 'crab-peeling' services online



    Curious diners at a seafood restaurant in Hangzhou were recently spotted crowding around to watch as a young woman hand-fed crab to a salivating gentleman. As it turns out, he bought her "crab-peeling services" on the internet for 260RMB.

    The woman reportedly offers her services on Taobao and charges 10RMB to peel each crab with an extra 5RMB if you want to be fed. This particular diner ordered 20 crabs in total and got a little discount because he ordered the "King Meal".

    The hostess says she quit her previous job as a flight attendant on a domestic airline to pursue the freedoms of part-time work. Despite her hands turning red after peeling numerous crabs, she smiled all the way through it and seemed to appreciate the publicity.

    Honestly, who could think of a better way to spend the equivalent of £26/40USD/$56AUD?






    These men wanted her to feed them too, but she turned them down. It seems she is very devoted to her work.






    He thanked the young lady, like a true gentleman, with good feedback on the app where she advertises her services.

    by Daniel Cunningham

    [Images via Sina]
    Contact the author of this article or email tips@shanghaiist.com with further questions, comments or tips.
    By Shanghaiist in News on Aug 28, 2015 4:30 PM
    Gene Ching
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  12. #57
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    But what about their Kung Fu?

    Women in China apparently competing in bikini contests to become flight attendants
    Mike 4 days ago



    The People’s Daily reports that graduates from a Quingdao-area school are encouraged to compete in a runway competition to net jobs as flight attendants or models.

    The role of flight attendant is a highly coveted one for women in much of East Asia. It’s one of the few jobs that affords young women relative independence and a chance to see the world. For some, it’s a sort of post-college sabbatical before plunging into office work or other pursuits; for others, it’s a long-term career.

    It’s also, unfortunately, a rampantly sexist industry.

    Many airlines throughout Asia hire female flight attendants exclusively, and tacitly apply “attractiveness standards” in their hiring process. While becoming a flight attendant in Japan means a few weeks at a specialty training college and a battery of tests in which manners and overall “femininity” are measured, it appears at least a few flight attendant training agencies in China aren’t even bothering with such a rouse – instead a Quingdao area school’s graduate runway competition is used to select potential future flight attendants based on attractiveness alone.

    The yearly “auditions,” which are run by a local modeling agency, apparently feature around 1,000 recruits from the school. The audience is largely composed of modeling agency talent scouts, but it appears many contestants are more interested in the airline flight attendant scouts also in the audience.

    Female contestants must meet various beauty criteria, including a height requirement (although, apparently, the agency in charge says especially beautiful contestants will get waived for height), and are not, supposedly, allowed to have any visible blemishes or scars on any areas of the body normally exposed by a swimsuit.

    The year is currently 2016.

    Source: The People’s Daily via The Independent
    The People's Daily image is clearer
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  13. #58
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    Slightly OT

    But so postable here.

    Sexy shanzhai stewardesses come out in support of Dongguan's anti-vice campaign



    On Wednesday afternoon in downtown Shenzhen, passersby were treated to the unusual sight of four young women dressed up as ****ty flight attendants advocating against vice.



    With navels exposed, the four young women held up a sign reading: "Support Dongguan's anti-vice campaign! Advocate civilized law enforcement, apologize to Shenzhen chengguan!"



    The somewhat perplexing performance was put on as a sort of response to public backlash following a stunt contrived by the same group earlier this month that featured even more young girls dressed in skimpy stewardess outfits "entertaining" chengguan at a high-end hotel in Dongguan for their "civilized service."





    Apparently, that event had caused a bit of difficulty for the Shenzhen chengguan, and the organizer wanted to put out another statement telling people to just lighten up.




    However, actual police didn't seem to appreciate the performance, shutting down the event within 30 minutes and launching a further investigation into the group's activities.



    For those not in the know, Dongguan is often referred to as China's "capital of sex" but has fallen on hard times as of late after a series of high-profile raids were carried out throughout the city's brothels in early 2014.
    The arrests nabbed up more than 1,000 people and cost the city an estimated 50 billion yuan ($8 billion) in business. It's estimated that 10% of the floating population in Dongguan, a city of 7 million people, were involved in the sex trade.
    Now, it seems that the trade has been left to a bunch of catfishing dudes online. It's unclear if the city will ever regain its former glory:


    [Images via NetEase]
    Contact the author of this article or email tips@shanghaiist.com with further questions, comments or tips.
    By Alex Linder in News on Jan 22, 2016 8:30 PM
    Attached Images Attached Images  
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  14. #59
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    A two-fer today

    This first one is slightly OT.

    Hong Kong cabin crew object to Emirates rule requiring them to wear China flag pin
    1 February 2016 10:56 Kris Cheng 2 min read

    Emirates airline crew members from Hong Kong have been required to wear both China and Hong Kong flag pins since last March. Staff may be punished if they do not follow the uniform policy, HKFP has learned.

    In an email sent to them in January 2015, cabin crew members were told they must wear a nationality flag pin on their waistcoats. The nationality flags they received were based on the nationality stated in their passports.


    Artist’s impression.

    “The aim was to celebrate the international team that we have on board each flight, as well as to help both our customers and cabin crew teams to make an instant connection – whether it is finding comfort and assistance, or common ground to start a conversation,” an Emirates spokesperson told HKFP. “We’ve received very positive feedback on this initiative to date.”
    However, Hong Kong crew members objected after their nationalities were switched from Hong Kong to China, following complaints from mainland Chinese crew members. Some Hong Kong staff were concerned that, since their new China flag pins were part of their standard uniform, they may “fail” company image and uniform checks if they did not wear them. Three “fails” could affect their promotion hopes, sources at the airline told HKFP.


    Photo: HKFP screenshot.

    Emirates said the company has more than 500 cabin crew who can communicate in Chinese, including Cantonese and Mandarin speakers. They confirmed they had received feedback from crew after the initiative was first introduced.
    “This was evaluated and addressed and a compromise reached,” the spokesperson said. The compromise made in February 2015 was that Hong Kong crew must wear both China and Hong Kong flag pins starting from March 14 last year.”There have been no complaints or feedback since, particularly relating to the use of the flag pins from either our Hong Kong or Chinese crew,” the spokesperson added. “We will of course continue to review this matter.”

    Sources told HKFP that some Hong Kong staff still preferred wearing only the Hong Kong flag. Though anyone spotted doing so could potentially face disciplinary action, with management threatening to revert to the China flag alone if staff did not wear both.
    This second one is more Kung Fu related. After all, to 'properly kneel in a pleasing fashion', you gotta have some fu skills.

    Aspiring Flight Attendants Need to Demonstrate Some Serious Dexterity
    A book on their heads, and paper between their knees



    While being a flight attendant can be demanding pretty much anywhere, the etiquette training Chinese flight attendants are subjected to at flight attendant college (yes, this is a thing) is certainly unique. As the photographs illustrate, prospective flight attendants practice tasks such as balancing bottles on their heads while holding a sheet of paper between their knees for three minutes at a time. Photos also show them practicing kneeling and smiling.

    Physical appearance is tremendously important, and flight attendants with certain Chinese airlines must comply with weight regulations as low as 50 kilograms (or 110 lbs) for vague reasons of “flight safety”.

    Strict etiquette training for flight attendants has been around for a while in China. Here’s an image that went viral last year:



    These women at the Beijing Vocational Training Institute in 2011 are seen balancing books on their heads while holding a sheet of paper between their knees.:




    These flight attendants represented the PLA air force for the 2011 National People’s Congress and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference:



    To those passengers who insist that their flight attendants attend college and learn how to properly kneel in a pleasing fashion, Chinese airlines are still keen on welcoming your business.
    Gene Ching
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  15. #60
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    Best post so far on this thread

    This thread rocks.

    The kung fu cabin crew! Flight attendants perform martial arts on a 6,560ft mountain ledge as part of their aviation school 'bravery training'

    The young women followed the instructions of a Taoist kung fu master
    'Bravery training' was organised on the peaks of China's Laojun Mountain
    Feat was part of a promotion for their company and for the local landscape

    By GEORGIA DIEBELIUS FOR MAILONLINE
    PUBLISHED: 07:48 EST, 8 March 2016 | UPDATED: 08:06 EST, 8 March 2016

    Stunning and bizarre photos from China have revealed the latest training and promotional techniques of aviation schools as a group of flight attendants performed martial arts on a mountain top.
    Dressed in formal blue uniforms and only missing their high heels, the young women followed the instructions of a Taoist kung fu master as they sought to toughen their resolve.
    The 'bravery training' was organised more than 6,560 feet above sea level, on the peaks of China's famous Laojun Mountain, located in the city of Luoyang, in central Henan Province.


    Three young women followed the instructions of a Taoist kung fu master as they sought to toughen up


    'Bravery training' was organised more than 6,560ft above sea level, on the peaks of China's Laojun Mountain

    The cabin crew members were guided by a Taoist priest, dressed in black, who demonstrated poses and techniques of martial arts.

    The three models and flight attendants tiptoed their way across the mountaintop for the stunning photoshoot.
    And the barefooted hostesses seemed to enjoy the feat on the mountaintop, which was part of a promotion for the aviation school and for the local landscape.


    The pictures are actually being used to promote the local scenery, surrounded by soaring clouds and greenery


    The barefooted hostesses seemed to enjoy the feat on the mountaintop, which was part of a promotion for their company and for the local landscape

    The pictures are actually being used to promote the local scenery, surrounded by soaring clouds and greenery, and will also encourage would-be stewardesses during the pursuit of their dream job in the air.
    The famous Laojun Mountain range forms part of a region that known as the Three Parallel Rivers – a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2003.
    It is a biodiversity hotspot and one of the few remaining places where the endangered Yunnan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus bieti) can still be found.


    Cabin crew members were guided by a Taoist priest, dressed in black, who demonstrated poses and techniques of martial arts
    Gene Ching
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