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Thread: yunnan baiyao

  1. #1
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    yunnan baiyao

    any recommendation of this tincture to use for injuries muscular or ligaments.

    Thanks,

    Mig

  2. #2
    works great on stanching small to medium cuts (I used to call it "insta-scab"), and it seems to have some anti-microbial properties as well; never took it internally so can't speak to its purported properties in that regards;

  3. #3
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    aconite

    This already came up on our Toxic-Chinese-medicine thread.
    TCM wonderdrug Yunnan Baiyao forced to reveal secret formula

    Staff Reporter
    2014-04-18
    10:57 (GMT+8)


    A box of Yunnan Baiyao capsules. (Photo/CFP)

    Yunnan Baiyao, a hemostatic over-the-counter Chinese herbal medicine developed more than a century ago, has long enjoyed preferential policies from the Chinese government, which allowed its formula to remain a secret — until now.

    The medicine, widely touted as a "miracle drug," was developed in the southwestern province of Yunnan by Qu Huanzhang in 1902. In China, the drug enjoys a similar reputation to the discovery and development of penicillin in the West.

    The complete formula and ingredients, however, are a great mystery. The "white drug from Yunnan" has been designated as a Class-1 protected traditional Chinese medicine formula in mainland China, which has allowed its producer, the state-run Yunnan Baiyao Group, to keep the formula a secret.

    Recently, after authorities renewed their guidelines for the publication of ingredients of Chinese medicines connected to classified state-level technical knowledge, Yunnan Baiyao reluctantly published the ingredients of the powdered medicine, which it said was a Chinese herb called "caowu," or "duanchangcao," in Chinese, and aconite or wolfsbane in English.

    The substance is classified as a poison, as are many other substances used in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Shanghai's China Business News said Yunnan Baiyao had not made public that the medicine contained aconite even in 2002, when the company listed eight ingredients of the drug in its application to the US Food and Drug Administration for a sales permit.

    Faced with safety concerns, Yunnan Baiyao executive Wu Wei stated in an interview with the newspaper that the toxicity of the ingredient had been reduced to "a safe range" through the company's unique processing techniques.

    The China Food and Drug Administration issued a notification in November 2013 stating that all Chinese medicinal drinks that contained ingredients classified as toxic must have ingredient notes that detail the toxins and a warning.

    Following the new regulations, Yunan Baiyao received criticism over its mystery ingredients, including aconite, which contains an alkaloid that affects the kidney. An overdose of aconite can cause symptoms similar to poisoning, including nausea, vomit and limb paralysis.

    Defending the toxicity of certain poisonous traditional Chinese medicine materials, Gao Xuemin, a professor at the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, said that all the materials had to undergo a series of complicated processing procedures before they could be used for medicinal purposes.

    During that process, their toxicity was greatly reduced. "It's the science and characteristic of the 5,000-year-old traditional Chinese medicine," Gao said.

    The West became familiar with Yunnan Baiyao during the Vietnam War when American soldiers noticed Vietcong soldiers wearing vials of the powder around their necks. They discovered that the powder was used topically to stop bleeding from bullet and knife wounds, preventing wounded combatants from bleeding out before getting medical attention.

    References:

    Qu Huanzhang 曲煥章

    caowu 草烏

    duanchangcao 斷腸草

    Wu Wei 吳偉

    Gao Xuemin 高學敏
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #4
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    That is unethical! Under proprietary and intellectual property laws, such a thing is not only illegal but highly suspect for the marketplace.
    If anything, the state entities should be looking to improve 'Yunnan Baiyao' and even follow GCP standard in the manufacturing environment. The problem with TCM herbal products (tablets, etc) is that they fail to meet current standards (product mis-identification, lack of sanitary facilities, improper measurement of main ingredients %wise) along with a disregard for the greater public health of the populace. It's a shame! Iam still waiting for KFC's secret formula to be shoed to the public! What about Pepsi and Mountain Dew?

  5. #5
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    leak gate?

    Yunnan Baiyao "secret" ingredients found on US websites
    This article was posted by Dan Siekman in News and published December 20, 2010



    The future of the state-owned Yunnan Baiyao pharmaceutical company is looking dimmer after news that Chinese netizens found a list of the supposedly secret ingredients to the company's eponymous Baiyao herbal medicine last month—published on the websites of Amazon.com and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the American regulatory body for pharmaceuticals.

    Said to have been invented in Yunnan in 1902 by an itinerant herb collector from Jiangchuan County named Qu Huanzhang (曲焕章), Yunnan Baiyao (云南白药 or Yunnan white medicine) carries the seemingly contradictory claims of both helping blood to clot and also promoting circulation of blood through the body.

    It has grown into a popular remedy in China for everything from joint aches to serious trauma. The Yunnan Baiyao company has also used the strength of the brand to expand its product line to include external pain creams and even toothpaste.

    Yunnan Baiyao pills are rumored to have first come to the attention of the United States during the Vietnam War. American soldiers are said to have discovered Vietcong soldiers carrying small brown spherical pills of Chinese origin that when eaten allowed them to survive otherwise mortal gunshot wounds.

    One of these "insurance pills" is still included with each package of the powdered and capsule versions of the medicine with instructions to take it in case of "severe traumatic injury."

    The medicine has long been known to be composed primarily of the Chinese herb pseudoginseng. But the other ingredients were a closely guarded secret, to the point that Beijing has declared it a "national level confidential product."

    Yunnan Baiyao is one of the most famous herbal medicines in China and the secrecy surrounding its ingredients carries a similar mystique to the Coca-Cola formula in the United States.

    So it was much to the surprise of Chinese internet users when English-language searches uncovered a list purporting to contain eight active ingredients of a liquid form of the drug in a document published on the FDA website that contains correspondence between the FDA and a distributor of the drug.


    A document on the FDA website listing Yunnan Baiyao ingredients

    Ingredient lists are also present in the product information sections for the powdered and capsule forms of the drug on Amazon.com.

    The incident, which some Chinese media have dubbed "leak-gate" (泄密门), reveals a large chasm in regulatory policy between China, which allows Yunnan Baiyao to be sold without a list of ingredients, and the FDA which requires full disclosure of the ingredients of pharmaceuticals as part of their approval process.

    It is apparently still unknown how the distributor or Amazon vendors gained access the ingredient lists.

    Although the proportions and exact manufacturing processes are still unknown for Yunnan Baiyao, this development opens the door for copycat products based on the formulation.
    I suppose it would be easy enough to mix this up yourself but there's no listing of proportions. And it's not like Yunnan Baiyao is that expensive.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  6. #6
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    From my part of the world, Angostura Bitters is well known, alleged to have put together from a secret recipe but it is known that alcohol content is around 45%. The rest is the secret.
    It is mostly used in drinks, and is usually used to season, marinate or otherwise give a distinctive taste to some foods.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angostura_bitters

    Giving the ingredients yunnan baiyao is great but you have to figure out % of each ingredient to reach the final goal!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by mawali View Post
    That is unethical! Under proprietary and intellectual property laws, such a thing is not only illegal but highly suspect for the marketplace.
    If anything, the state entities should be looking to improve 'Yunnan Baiyao' and even follow GCP standard in the manufacturing environment. The problem with TCM herbal products (tablets, etc) is that they fail to meet current standards (product mis-identification, lack of sanitary facilities, improper measurement of main ingredients %wise) along with a disregard for the greater public health of the populace. It's a shame! Iam still waiting for KFC's secret formula to be shoed to the public! What about Pepsi and Mountain Dew?
    That's the herbal market my friend. The do not have to meet any requirements except , Ideally don't kill anyone. The Gov via drug companies wanting to control this competing market would love to shut it right down. Take control and sell or stop sale altogether. It is a huge industry.

    So, best you can do is find reputable companies. Those that do inspect and test their products and use pharmaceutical processing. Testing for toxicity, etc. NOW brand was good but I have heard they are slipping some. The do have a great facility. Used to buy top quality raw but they may have no choice but to buy less choice product now. Depends what is for sale.

    You can look for standardized. Not all believe in it . Believe there is other equally important things in an herbs and not that which it is just standardized for. I prefer standardization. I simply do not know enough about raw product to guess what is good or not and I am not sure I would just trust anyone selling me tree bark or road weed as this is top dollar stuff my man.

    Part of the reason I wanted everyone to get and read that James Lee book was his thoughts on Dit Jow. You should read it if you have not.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by boxerbilly View Post
    That's the herbal market my friend. The do not have to meet any requirements except , Ideally don't kill anyone. The Gov via drug companies wanting to control this competing market would love to shut it right down. Take control and sell or stop sale altogether. It is a huge industry.

    So, best you can do is find reputable companies. Those that do inspect and test their products and use pharmaceutical processing. Testing for toxicity, etc. NOW brand was good but I have heard they are slipping some. The do have a great facility. Used to buy top quality raw but they may have no choice but to buy less choice product now. Depends what is for sale.

    You can look for standardized. Not all believe in it . Believe there is other equally important things in an herbs and not that which it is just standardized for. I prefer standardization. I simply do not know enough about raw product to guess what is good or not and I am not sure I would just trust anyone selling me tree bark or road weed as this is top dollar stuff my man.

    Part of the reason I wanted everyone to get and read that James Lee book was his thoughts on Dit Jow. You should read it if you have not.
    I always wonder if those concoctions or secret recipes can only alleviate but not cure whatever may happen in muscles, ligaments and nerves in between. So far still a mystery to me.

  9. #9
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    Aconite can be poisonous but so can digitalis.

    Yunnan Baiyao applied externally would not carry the risk of toxicity as the amount of aconitine (the toxic stuff) is miniscule to begin with and even less is absorbed through the skin.

    Taken internally, one should only use under the close supervision of a qualified herbalist. Yes, there are a few reports of adverse events. However millions have taken it without issue.

    To be clear - liquid form is not to be taken internally.

    Powdered form may be applied to cuts or taken internally for hemorrhage. It should be used only for serious conditions, not to resolve your post-workout aches and pains. There are better and gentler formulas for that.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I suppose it would be easy enough to mix this up yourself but there's no listing of proportions. And it's not like Yunnan Baiyao is that expensive.
    That's not the real formula. They modified the formula so that they could sell it in North America. That's why the North American version of Yunnan Bai Yao doesn't work as well as the original formula.

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