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Thread: Shaolin diet, vegetarianism and stuff

  1. #781
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    "A study found that vegetarians were less likely to die than meat eaters."

    That second caption is really funny. I mean...we're all gonna die.

    Do Vegetarians Live Longer Than Meat Eaters? Why Biologists Aren't Sure Yet
    Should you avoid meat for a long and healthy life?



    By James Brown on June 21, 2019

    Our ability to live a long life is influenced by a combination of our genes and our environment. In studies that involve identical twins, scientists have estimated that no more than 30% of this influence comes from our genes, meaning that the largest group of factors that control how long a person lives is their environment.
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    Of the many possible environmental factors, few have been as thoroughly studied or debated as our diet. Calorie restriction, for example, is one area that is being investigated. So far, studies seem to show that restricting calories can increase lifespan, at least in small creatures. But what works for mice doesn’t necessarily work for humans.


    A study found that vegetarians were less likely to die than meat eaters.

    What we eat — as opposed to how much we eat — is also a hot topic to study, and meat consumption is often put under the microscope. A study that tracked almost 100,000 Americans for five years found that non-meat eaters were less likely to die — of any cause — during the study period than meat eaters. This effect was especially noticeable in males.

    Some meta-analyses, which combine and re-analyze data from several studies, have also shown that a diet low in meat is associated with greater longevity, and that the longer a person sticks to a meat-free diet, the greater the benefit. Not all studies agree, however. Some show very little or even no difference at all in longevity between meat eaters and non-meat eaters.

    What is clear is evidence that meat-free diets can reduce the risk of developing health problems such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and even cancer. There is some evidence to suggest that vegan diets possibly offer added protection above a standard vegetarian diet. These findings are far easier to interpret, as they report the actual event of being diagnosed with a health problem rather than death from any cause.

    So can we confidently say that avoiding meat will increase your lifespan? The simple answer is: not yet.

    The Problem With Longevity

    The first thing that is clear is that, compared with most other creatures, humans live for a very long time. This makes it very difficult to run studies that measure the effect of anything on longevity. (You’d have difficulty finding a scientist willing to wait 90 years for a study to complete.) Instead, scientists either look back at existing health records or recruit volunteers for studies that use shorter time periods, measuring death rates and looking to see which group, on average, was mostly likely to die first. From this data, claims are made about the effect certain activities have on longevity, including avoiding meat.

    There are problems with this approach. First, finding a link between two things — such as eating meat and an early death — doesn’t necessarily mean one thing caused the other. In other words: correlation does not equal causation. It may appear that vegetarianism and longevity are related, but a different variable may explain the link. It could be that vegetarians exercise more, smoke less, and drink less alcohol than their meat-eating counterparts, for example.


    Maybe vegetarians exercise more than meat eaters.

    Nutrition studies also rely on volunteers accurately and truthfully recording their food intake. But this can’t be taken for granted. Studies have shown that people tend to underreport calorie intake and overreport healthy food consumption. Without actually controlling the diet of groups of people and measuring how long they live, it is difficult to have absolute confidence in findings.

    So should I avoid meat for a long and healthy life? The key to healthy aging probably does lie in controlling our environment, including what we eat. From the available evidence, it is possible that eating a meat-free diet can contribute to this, and that avoiding meat in your diet could certainly increase your chances of avoiding disease as you age. But there’s certainly also evidence to suggest that this really might work in tandem with avoiding some clearer risks to longevity, including smoking
    THREADS
    Shaolin diet, vegetarianism and stuff
    ironfist view on protein, vegetarianism
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips

  2. #782
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    daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaammmmmmmmmmmnnnnnnn

    Rick Wiles: Plant-Based Meat Alternatives Are a Satanic Plot to ‘Create a Race of Soulless Creatures’
    By Kyle Mantyla | June 13, 2019 10:49 am

    End Times broadcaster Rick Wiles warned on his “TruNews” program last night that the rise of companies like Impossible Foods, which is developing plant-based alternatives to meat and dairy products, is part of a satanic plot to alter human DNA so that people can no longer worship God.

    “When you go to your favorite fast food restaurant, you are going to be eating a fake hamburger,” Wiles said. “You’re going to go to the grocery store and buy a pound of fake hamburger or a fake steak, and you won’t know that it was grown in some big corporation’s laboratory. This is the nightmare world that they are taking us into. They’re changing God’s creation. Why? Because they want to be God.”

    “God is an environmentalist,” Wiles continued. “He takes this very seriously. He created this planet, he created the universe and he’s watching these Luciferians destroy this planet, destroy the animal kingdom, destroy the plant kingdom, change human DNA. Why? They want to change human DNA so that you can’t be born again. That’s where they’re going with this, to change the DNA of humans so it will be impossible for a human to be born again. They want to create a race of soulless creatures on this planet.”

    Rick Wiles: Plant-Based Meat Alternatives Are a Satanic Plot to ‘Create a Race of Soulless Creatures’
    The second link is to the vimeo vid; vimeo vids aren't embedding properly lately here.

    Is it wrong that I want to distinguish myself as a pescatarian luciferian now?

    THREADS
    Shaolin diet, vegetarianism and stuff
    ironfist view on protein, vegetarianism
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips

  3. #783
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    where can I get the good Mantou buns though?
    ital vital with the mantou bread/ bok choy/ eggplant daily will have you built like Shifu Yan Lei
    also good is eggplant bokchoy mushroom beet and red potato stew. iron lion food.

    Amituofo
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  4. #784
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    what we eat vs when we eat, good practical perspective. both are going to depend on the individual eating and their physical goals.
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  5. #785
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    The Marrot



    I realize this is one of those neurotic reaction things like Straight Pride or White Pride, and that it's a parody publicity stunt from Arby's, but if you're going to really make fake vegetables out of meat, they should attempt to taste like the vegetable. Plus it's cheating to use the actual vegetable as part of the ingredients. That's like dipping an impossible burger in meat drippings.
    This marrot will just taste like turkey dipped in carrots.

    THREADS
    Shaolin diet, vegetarianism and stuff
    Vegetarian
    Fast Food Nastiness
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips

  6. #786
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    wow.... gotta love good ol american logic and ingenuity lol
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  7. #787
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    The end? I doubt that.



    Rowan Jacobsen
    Jul 31, 2019
    This Is the Beginning of the End of the Beef Industry


    Alt meat isn't going to stay alt for long, and cattle are looking more and more like stranded assets

    There’s a famous Gandhi aphorism about how movements progress: “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” That was actually written by the Workshop on Nonviolence Institute as a summary of Gandhi’s philosophy, but regardless, it’s remarkable how often it accurately describes the evolution of causes, from legal cannabis to gay marriage. I’ve been thinking about that quote since I wrote my first piece about plant-based meat (or alt meat, as I like to call it) for Outside in 2014. Back then, we were firmly in the “laugh at you” stage. Beyond Meat, the first of the Silicon Valley startups to use advanced technology to produce extremely meat-like burgers, had been ignored for its first few years, but in 2014, it released its Beast Burger, which was treated by the press and public as a slightly off-putting curiosity. What was this stuff? Would anyone actually eat it? Ewwww.

    That product wasn’t very good—I compared it to Salisbury steak—and when Ethan Brown, Beyond Meat’s founder, announced his intention to end livestock production, you could almost hear the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association laughing in the background.

    But I didn’t laugh. I knew it would keep getting better and beef wouldn’t. And I thought the bar was pretty low. Sure, steak is great, but ground beef makes up 60 percent of beef sales, and most of it is more Salisbury than salutary, a greasy vehicle for the yummy stuff: ketchup, mushrooms, pickles, bacon, sriracha mayo. I knew I wouldn’t object if my central puck came from a plant, as long as it chewed right and tasted right. I suspected others might feel the same.

    In the following years, Beyond Meat was joined by Impossible Foods, a more sophisticated startup with even more venture capital. Its Impossible Burger was way better than Salisbury steak. All the cool cats started serving it, from David Chang in New York to Traci Des Jardins in San Francisco. My conviction grew.

    Part of the appeal of the new burgers is their smaller environmental footprint. Beef is the most wasteful food on the planet. Cows are not optimized to make meat; they’re optimized to be cows. It takes 36,000 calories of feed to produce 1,000 calories of beef. In the process, it uses more than 430 gallons of water and 1,500 square feet of land, and it generates nearly ten kilograms of greenhouse-gas emissions. In comparison, an Impossible Burger uses 87 percent less water, 96 percent less land, and produces 89 percent fewer greenhouse-gas emissions. Beyond Meat’s footprint is similarly svelte.

    Yes, a good argument can be made that small-farm, grass-fed beef production (in places that can grow abundant grass) has a very different ethical and environmental landscape, but unfortunately, that’s just not a significant factor. America gets 97 percent of its beef from feedlots. And feedlots are irredeemable.

    By 2018, sales of both the Beyond Burger and the Impossible Burger were surging, and the companies began to ink deals with restaurant chains. Beyond Meat got Carl’s Jr. and A&W (as well as supermarket chains like Food Lion and Safeway), while Impossible got White Castle.

    I tracked down a White Castle shortly after the Impossible Slider arrived in the spring of 2018. I’d never been to a White Castle, so I ordered an Impossible Slider and a regular slider. The Impossible was...fine. About what you’d expect. White Castle steams all its meat, which is hard to get past, but with plenty of cheese, it went down easy.

    The regular slider, on the other hand, was horrific. I peeled back the pasty bun and stared at the fetid shingle inside. It was appallingly thin and grimy. It made the Impossible Slider look lush and juicy. The bar for fast-food burgers is even lower than I thought. Nobody will miss these ****ty little brown things when they’re gone.

    Perhaps this explains why the chains are latching on to plant-based burgers as if they were life rings. White Castle initially tested its Impossible Slider in just a few locations in New York, New Jersey, and Chicago in April 2018. It was such a hit that the company quickly expanded the program to all 380 outlets. “People are coming back for it again and again,” White Castle’s vice president, Jamie Richardson, said with a touch of astonishment.

    They’re coming back at Del Taco, too, which launched a Beyond Meat taco in April. Within two months, it had sold two million, one of the most successful product launches in its history, so it decided to add Beyond Meat burritos as well.

    And then there’s Burger King. The second-largest fast-food chain in the world rattled big beef’s cage by testing an Impossible Whopper in St. Louis in April. Resulting foot traffic was so strong that Burger King decided to serve the Impossible Whopper in all 7,200 restaurants, marking the moment when alt meat stopped being alt.

    That was enough to get the meat industry to snap to attention. “About a year and a half ago, this wasn’t on my radar whatsoever,” said Mark Dopp, head of regulatory affairs for the North American Meat Association, to The New York Times. “All of a sudden, this is getting closer.”

    The strategy, predictably yet pathetically, was to engage in an ontological battle over the term meat itself. Big beef successfully lobbied for a labeling law in Missouri banning any products from identifying themselves as meat unless they are “derived from harvested production livestock or poultry.” (But this is wrong; the word simply meant sustenance for the first thousand years of its existence.) Similar labeling laws have passed or are pending in a dozen more states, most of them big ranching ones.

    Obviously, none of this has stemmed the rise of alt meat. But it did make me think again of Gandhi (a staunch vegetarian, FYI). They ignored, they laughed, and now they were fighting.

    This stuff, I thought, just might win.

    This year is shaping up to be the inflection point when this becomes obvious to everybody else. Beyond Meat’s products are in 15,000 grocery stores in the U.S., and its sales have more than doubled each year. On May 2, it held its IPO, offering stock at $25, which turned out to be a wild underestimation of what investors thought the company was worth. It immediately leaped to $46 and closed the day at $65.75. That one-day pop of 163 percent was one of the best in decades, putting to shame such 2019 IPOs as Lyft (21 percent) and Pinterest (25 percent), to say nothing of Uber (negative 3 percent). In the following days, it kept ripping, climbing above $150, where it has stayed. The market currently estimates Beyond Meat’s worth at close to $10 billion.

    Not to be outdone, that same month, Impossible Foods raised an additional $300 million dollars from private investors (for a running total of $740 million and a valuation of $2 billion) and announced it would be joining Beyond Meat in America’s grocery stores later this year. These companies are no longer little mammals scurrying around the feet of the big-beef dinosaurs. And they are gearing up for an epic head-to-head battle.

    Both Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods recently released new, improved versions of their meat. For the past week, I’ve subsisted on little else. It feels great. Both have the same amount of protein as ground beef (about 20 grams per quarter-pound serving) and less fat. Being plant-based, they also provide a healthy shot of fiber. Both get their unctuousness from coconut oil.

    But the core of each formula is very different. Beyond uses pea protein, while Impossible uses soy. Beyond gets its bloody color from beet juice; Impossible uses heme—the same molecule that makes our blood red—to achieve its meaty color and flavor. This is its killer app. Beef gets its beefiness from heme. When you cook heme, it produces the distinctive savory, metallic flavor of meat. Since heme is normally found in blood, no veggie concoction has ever used it. Soy plants do make microscopic amounts of it, but not enough to ever use. Impossible Foods’ breakthrough was to genetically engineer yeast to produce soy heme in a tank, like beer. This GMO process is a deal breaker for some people, but it makes all the difference. The Impossible Burger is incredible, the Beyond Burger merely passable.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips

  8. #788
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    Continued from previous post

    The Beyond Burger comes as two premade four-ounce patties (packaged in a plastic tray wrapped in more plastic—strike one). They don’t quite pass as hamburgers. They’re too wet and too pink. They almost resemble finely ground salmon burgers. They cook to a satisfying toothiness on either a grill or a griddle, but there’s an inexplicable cellulose quality to the texture. (This is even more pronounced in the Beyond Sausage.) The flavor is also slightly off. There’s a hint of fake smoke and an earthiness I’m guessing comes from the beet juice. (My wife would argue that it’s more than slightly off; she has to leave the room when the Beyond Burger is cooking. But she also hates beets.) It’s not an unpleasant experience, just don’t expect the burgergasm you get from a quarter pound of USDA prime.

    Impossible Foods, on the other hand, has delivered burgergasm after burgergasm. It’s shine-up-the-Nobel-Prize good. Not only does it taste like ground beef, it looks and acts like it, too. It’s truly plug and play.

    That wasn’t true for the previous version. When I first wrote about Impossible Foods three years ago, I had to beg the company to send me one patty. It was hesitant. Back then, the burger was fussy. It didn’t work well on a grill, so you had to pan-fry it just right. The company made me do a Skype tutorial first, and when the micropatty arrived in a refrigerated box, with a special bun and special sauce, it was accompanied by pages of printed instructions. The burger was good, certainly the most meat-like plant patty up to that point, but it still tasted like a lite product—a little cleaner, a little less decadent, a little bit like filler.

    This time, when I asked the company to send me a burger, a five-pound block of meat—clearly what it normally ships to food-service companies—arrived on my doorstep. No instructions, no hand-holding. It looked identical to ground beef, so that’s how I treated it. And that’s how it performed. I made sliders, kebabs, nachos, chili, Bolognese sauce, even a little tartare (note: the company frowns hard on this).

    If I’m being honest, I find that I slightly prefer it to real beef. It’s rich and juicy, more savory, but still somehow cleaner and less cloying. Now when I go back to regular beef, I notice a whiff of the charnel house in it, something musty and gray that I don’t like and don’t need.

    In the coming years, expect a lot of other omnivores to have similar epiphanies. Impossible Foods has performed more than 26,000 blind taste tests on its burger, which is on track to surpass ground beef in those tests in the near future. What happens then? Impossible has been laser focused on creating the perfect simulacrum of ground beef. But why? The cow never had a lock on gastronomic perfection. It was just the best we could do given the limitations of the natural material. Firelight was fine until electricity came along. Then things got really interesting.

    Look for something similar to happen with alt meat. For now, it’s necessary to make people comfortable with the familiar, the way Steve Jobs loaded the early iPhones with faux felt and wood grain. But once people stop expecting burgers to refer to a hunk of flesh, the brakes on deliciousness will be released.

    This will be generational. All change is. Most Baby Boomers are going to stick with their beef, right up to the point where their dentures can’t take it anymore. But Gen Z will find the stuff as embarrassing as Def Leppard and dad jeans.

    As this shift accelerates, the beef industry will lose its last advantage—price. Most offerings made with Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are about a buck a burger more expensive. But it’s inherently cheaper to make a burger directly out of plants than it is to feed those plants to an animal first. Beef is currently cheaper because of scale. Big food companies can negotiate tremendously reduced prices for feed, and gigantic factories and supply chains are much more efficient to run.

    But the playing field is leveling fast. Last week, Dunkin’ announced a new Beyond Sausage breakfast sandwich that will be just 14 cents more than the meat version. But more than anything Beyond Meat or Impossible Foods has accomplished, the true death knell for the cattlemen is how the mainstream food industry has embraced alt meat. Whole Foods just announced it will start selling burgers from the UK-based startup the Meatless Farm in all of its stores. Nestle is launching its Awesome Burger this fall. Tyson Foods, America’s largest meat producer, just debuted its own plant-based nuggets, with more products to come. Tyson CEO Noel White said he expects Tyson “to be a market leader in alternative protein, which is experiencing double-digit growth and could someday be a billion-dollar business for our company.”

    If that quote isn’t enough to send chills down the spine of any meat producer, try this one from Perdue Farms chairman Jim Perdue: “Our vision is to be the most trusted name in premium protein. It doesn’t say premium meat protein, just premium protein. That’s where consumers are going.”

    And that’s where these companies will go. Beef is a headache. It comes with a lot of baggage to worry about: antibiotic resistance, E. coli outbreaks, animal welfare, climate change. It’s the kind of icky biological variable that corporate America would love to leave behind—and as soon as beef becomes less profitable, it will.

    Recent projections suggest that 60 percent of the meat eaten in 2040 will be alt, a figure I think may actually be too conservative. An estimated 95 percent of the people buying alt burgers are meat-eaters. This is not about making vegetarians happy. It’s not even about climate change. This is a battle for America’s flame-broiled soul. Meat is about to break free from its animal past. As traditional meat companies embrace alt meat with the fervor of the just converted, making it cheap and ubiquitious, it’s unclear if Beyond Meat or Impossible Foods can survive the feeding frenzy (though Impossible’s patents on its core IP may help), but at least they’ll be able to comfort themselves with a modern take on Gandhi’s wisdom:

    First they ignore you.
    Then they laugh at you.
    Then they sue you.
    Then they try to buy you.
    Then they copy you.
    Then they steal your shelf space.
    Then they put you out of business.
    Then you’ve won.

    Lead Photo: Yifan Wu
    Beef isn't like coal. People don't really crave coal like they crave beef. So I doubt the industry will ever become obsolete. It does have to rethink how it functions. The math behind cheap burgers - something must be wrong there, something that we can fix.

    I'm not quite vegetarian, but I stopped eating beef years ago. For me, it was a Buddhist devotional sacrifice. It's been really fascinating to me to watch this trend.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips

  9. #789
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    Zhenmeat

    Plant-based alternative meats for Chinese food – dim sum, hotpot, mooncakes and more – set for launch
    Created to be the ‘Chinese version of Impossible Foods’, Zhenmeat offers plant- and fungus-based protein products tailored for Chinese cuisine
    Founder Vince Lu says there is a big gap in China’s plant-based meat market as producers target vegetarians, not the general public who consume meat
    Elaine Yau
    Published: 6:15pm, 4 Sep, 2019


    Vince Lu, founder of plant-based alternative meat company Zhenmeat, showcasing mooncakes made with his company’s products.

    Lean, muscular and sharply dressed, Beijing-based entrepreneur Vince Lu Zhongming has come a long way from the overweight and aimless university student he was a few years ago.
    While studying materials science in the US at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Lu struggled with what to do with his life. He was eating a lot of processed meat and gained 20 kilograms (44 pounds) in a semester, leaving him unhappy with his self-image.
    A near-death experience sprang him from his funk: he lost control of his car while driving in freezing temperatures in Illinois and it crashed.
    “It was the worst accident I have ever experienced,” Lu says. “I was rescued with no injuries, but was told I had cheated death. Since then, I have been filled with gratitude. I want to value life and give back to society.”

    .
    Lu before he lost weight.

    The crash prompted him to get back into shape, revert to a healthier diet and become a regular gym goer. He studied protein properties to learn how to better fuel his workouts. After graduating he set up a start-up called Fuchouzhe, which makes protein bars to boost nutrition and sports performance.
    Based on Fuchouzhe’s success, he went further. He launched a plant-based meat start-up – Zhenmeat – with the goal of developing it into a Chinese version of US-based Impossible Foods.
    With African swine fever prompting widespread pig culls and rising calls for reduced meat consumption in China, overseas substitute meat producers are salivating over the huge China market.
    According to a report by The Good Food Institute released in May, the market size of China’s domestic plant-based meat industry in 2018 was about 6.1 billion yuan (US$850 million), 14.3 per cent higher than the previous year. The US market size that year was US$684 million, up 23 per cent over 2017.
    Although less than 10 per cent of Chinese participants surveyed as part of the report identified as vegan, vegetarian or pescatarian (fish but not meat eaters), 86.7 per cent had consumed plant-based meat products.


    Plant-based meat mooncakes from Zhenmeat.

    US plant-based meat firm Beyond Meat plans to start distributing in China in the second half of this year. Also planning a mainland China launch later this year is Hong Kong-based Right Treat, which developed pork alternative Omnipork from peas, soy and mushroom proteins. After entering the Hong Kong market last year, US-based Impossible Foods plans to launch its products in mainland China within the next two years.
    Lu’s Beijing-based start-up Zhenmeat is stealing a march on these overseas rivals, rolling out its products this month.
    “Running Fuchouzhe allows me to understand protein’s nutritional properties and supply chains. China’s breakneck economic growth has led to a big demand for quality protein,” he says.


    Peppers stuffed with Zhenmeat products being served in a Chinese restaurant.

    Ahead of the launch tomorrow (September 5), Lu has been touring China to promote Zhenmeat’s products, which include plant-based sausage and steak, and faux meat mooncakes and meatballs.
    In an April talk at the Food and Beverage Innovation Forum in Shanghai, Lu described the products as a mixture of plant- and fungus-based protein including pea, mushroom, soy and brown rice protein, with pea protein being the main ingredient.
    Zhenmeat sources organic peas from Canada. Peas have high nutritional value and contain eight amino acids – more than soybeans, Lu says, adding the other sources of protein in the products ensure they are comprehensive in nutrition. People need 18 kinds of amino acids, which single sources of beans don’t provide, he says.
    I am 180cm tall but weighed 100kg, which was quite terrible. Within a year of my diet switch, I lost 20kg. Plant-based protein is the food of the future
    Vince Lu
    While Impossible Foods’ Impossible Burger uses soy protein, pea protein is increasingly being embraced as a main ingredient for plant-based alternative meat producers. Beyond Meat uses pea instead of soy protein. California-based Ripple Foods, meanwhile, produces pea-protein alternative dairy products.
    “There’s a big gap in the plant-based meat market in China as the current Chinese plant-based meat manufacturers mostly serve the vegetarian market instead of the general public who consume meat,” Lu says.
    “The traditional vegetarian faux meat [served in Chinese Buddhist restaurants] has a heavy taste of beans. The taste, texture, colour and smell does not resemble that of real meat. The success of those American companies [like Impossible Foods] has inspired us to make plant-based meat that tastes like real meat.”


    Protein bars from Fuchouzhe.

    Lu credited the success of Impossible Foods to its use of heme, a molecule containing iron responsible for making plant-based meat taste like real meat.
    “Heme is found in animals’ blood and muscle, and also plants. No mainland meat alternative producers use heme in their products, so Chinese consumers are sacrificing the gastronomic satisfaction coming from eating meat when they consume Chinese plant-based products,” Lu says.
    Impossible Foods has secured the patent for its use of heme in its meat substitutes, so Zhenmeat is studying how to replicate heme using its own technology, which may take up to three years.
    “Currently, our products use natural flavour extracts and spices to imitate the taste of meat. Our products have higher protein content than real meat. The quality fats in our products come from coconut oils,” Lu says, adding that without heme, his products can attain only 70 per cent of the desired target for taste and texture.


    Lu sampling Zhenmeat products with a Chinese chef.

    Zhenmeat has so far secured five million yuan from Chinese investors. Unlike overseas plant-based meat producers which offer mostly burger patties and other Western food offerings, Lu says his products will target Chinese cuisine.
    “Our products will be sold online and offered in various Chinese restaurants including dim sum, Sichuan and hotpot eateries. We have no plans to expand outside China,” he says.
    Lu is convinced the business will do well, having personally benefited from cutting out meat.
    “I am 180cm tall but weighed 100kg, which was quite terrible. Within a year of my diet switch, I lost 20kg. Plant-based protein is the food of the future.”

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: for substitute meats, the stakes couldn’t be higher
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  10. #790
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    tradition for 1,400 years

    Anyone who has done even a cursory study of Buddhism and Daoism in China knows the longstanding tradition of meat substitutes. China is way ahead of the world on this one.

    The challenges of selling mock meat to China
    Firms trying to break into the market have to be aware that alternatives are far from new; mock meat has been part of the culinary tradition for 1,400 years and the nation already has numerous players with a wide range of products
    SCMP Editorial
    Published: 9:30pm, 27 Oct, 2019


    A pressing reason China may be a prime market for the alternative meat products would also seem to lie in the African swine fever outbreak that, since last year, has decimated the nation’s pork stocks. Photo: AFP

    China is a prime market for the alternative meat phenomenon sweeping the West. The nation ticks all the right boxes – plant-based options help ensure food security, are environmentally friendly and, as a result of the way industry trends have moved, are hi-tech. Three years ago, in an effort to ward off health problems such as cancers, obesity and diabetes, Beijing also issued dietary guidelines recommending a halving of meat consumption. But a pressing reason would also seem to lie in the African swine fever outbreak that, since last year, has decimated the nation’s pork stocks.
    A Hong Kong-based company is already making plans to sell its pork substitute products on the mainland. Prices of the white meat have skyrocketed as a result of the outbreak, which has forced the culling of, by some estimates, half of the country’s pigs. China is the world’s biggest pork consumer, accounting for 50 per cent of the global total. But the nation’s 1.4 billion people are lovers of all sorts of meat, last year consuming 86 million tonnes, more than any other country.
    Demand increased by 14 per cent between 2017 and 2018, in keeping with global trends that the wealthier a society gets, the more it can afford meat. Companies that produce alternatives promote products as being plant-based, which sounds healthy, and eating vegetables is claimed to be better than livestock, which are sometimes raised inhumanely and cause 14.5 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions. But firms trying to break into the Chinese market have to also be aware that alternatives are far from new; mock meat has been part of the culinary tradition for 1,400 years and the nation already has numerous players with a wide range of products. Nationwide sales of alternative meats are the biggest in the world.
    The industry is not new to China, but science means there have been innovations that improve productivity and taste. That does not necessarily also mean healthier products, nor ones that are less expensive. But in a world with a fast-growing population and rising appetite for meat, with Asia and Africa the biggest growth areas, governments have to look to sustainability. Encouraging and welcoming competition and promoting plant-based meat alternatives makes good sense.

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Selling mock meat to China is a challenge

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    Shaolin diet, vegetarianism and stuff
    Bacon!!!!!!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips

  11. #791
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    shaolin monks diet

    What is the Shaolin monks diet?

    Shaolin Monks consume a strictly vegetarian diet with some unique attributes. This diet is commonly referred to as “The Shaolin Temple Diet.” It is a science of good health, preventing a wide range of illnesses, including heart disease and cancer, but Shaolin Monks also adhere to it because of their Buddhist belief systems.

    A Shaolin breakfast is usually something as simple as good old-fashioned beans. This is followed by vegetables for lunch, typically eaten raw. Spices are a no no for the Monks, because they believe any kind of flavor or spiciness incites emotion. Finally, at dinner, they mix things up with noodles and, wait for it… bread. Of course, both these exciting ingredients also have to be whole wheat and gluten free.

    Techniques To Train Like A Shaolin Monk fight

    Vary Your Speed - Slow your movements down then pace them up. See how fast you can do them before you become sloppy. This will give you an insight into how well you know the movements.
    Dig Deep - A person looking for water doesn't run around everywhere but stays in one place and keeps digging. It's the same with your practice. Stay with it. Shaolin Monks practice each Shaolin kung fu kick more than a hundred times a day.
    Forget Instant - Yes, I'm guilty of this myself because I call my books Instant Fitness and Instant Health. In some ways, it is instant because we're one breath away from being calm. But for lasting health and fitness, this takes a change of lifestyle. The very meaning of Kung Fu is something which takes a lot of time to master.

  12. #792
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    Shindo Ramen Zendo noodles

    A cup ramen for Zen Buddhists: New Shindo Ramen Zendo noodles are meat, dairy and egg free
    Katy Kelly 15 hours ago



    These ascetic noodles taste like soy sauce, and leave out all animal products — as well as the five pungent roots!

    Sometimes what we think we want and what we need are at odds. Perhaps your body thinks it wants a gigantic slab of beef on a burger, but you’d actually be much more spiritually satisfied with a meatless curry. This goes double in recent times, seeing how the meat industry has a not-insignificant impact on the environment, and so it’s little wonder that the food industry is looking for ways to cater to vegetarian and vegan palates.

    But as it turns out, there’s a set of experts who are old hands at this whole “restrictive diet” thing. That’s right: Buddhist monks! Shojin ryori is the name given to the diet eaten by devout monks, and while said diet varies based on location and teachings, the general rules remain the same: no meat, no eggs, no fish — and none of the five pungent roots either. This refers to aromatic roots: garlic, Allium chinense, asafoetida, shallot and mountain leek, all of which are said to “excite and stimulate” the palate.

    Shoji Ramen Zendo, a cup ramen brand that went on sale on February 1, promises to avoid animal products — as well as any exciting and stimulating flavors.

    ▼ Even the packaging is calm, clean and minimalistic.


    Zen-Foods, creator of Shoji Ramen Zendo, spent three whole years perfecting their recipe to provide a wholesome, nourishing meal for vegetarians and vegans…while honoring the principles of an austere Zen diet. They’ve dabbled in the cup ramen market prior to this, but this marks Zen-Foods’ first soy sauce ramen, and unlike their previous offerings the Shoji Ramen Zendo comes with soy meat toppings!

    ▼ Rather than aromatic herbs, this ramen uses bok choy, ginseng and pumpkin for added flavor.


    The base for the broth was created by brewing Japanese kelp alongside other vegetables in soy sauce, and results in a mellow, “nostalgic” flavor that even meat-eaters should be able to appreciate. And at under 300 kilocalories, it’s a light and refreshing meal that won’t leave you feeling as encumbered as other variations on cup ramen that we could name.

    Don’t hold your breath waiting to see this frugal noodle cup on supermarket shelves, though. If you want to taste this healthy twist on a classic snack, you’ll need to order it directly for now, from the supplier in a case of twelve for 3,600 yen plus tax (US$32.78).

    Source, images: PR Times
    Related: Zen Foods
    I'd support these if they were available, even if it's almost $3 per cup.

    THREADS
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    Zen/Buddhist brand names
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips

  13. #793
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    Dec 1969
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    The plant based crayfish pic reminds me of a dinner I had with Shi Suxi

    His chef made the most amazing veggie prawns complete with antennae.

    China embraces plant-based protein as consumers look for alternatives to meat amid Covid-19
    Beyond Meat, the US plant-based meat company that launched a successful IPO on Nasdaq in May last year, made its retail debut in China last month
    China’s vegan food market is forecast to be worth nearly US$12 billion by 2023, up from just under US$10 billion in 2018
    Yujie Xue in Shenzhen
    Published: 6:15pm, 6 Aug, 2020


    Plant-based crayfish from Chinese start-up Zhenmeat. Photo: Handout

    With wet markets in China under the spotlight as potential hotspots for fresh coronavirus outbreaks, consumers are looking for alternative sources of protein in their diets. That shift is providing start-ups and their investors with an opportunity to profit from China’s fledgling food tech sector.
    Beyond Meat, the US plant-based meat company that launched a successful initial public offering on Nasdaq in May last year, made its retail debut in China last month with its Beyond Burger available in Alibaba Group Holding’s 50 Freshippo stores in Shanghai. The company also pledged to bring its products to 48 more Freshippo stores across China by the end of the year.
    The partnership with Alibaba, which owns the South China Morning Post, is the latest move in China’s increasingly crowded food tech sector. In June, Yum China – owner of China’s KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell outlets – also joined with Beyond Meat to offer several plant-based beef dishes.
    Hong Kong plant-based meat brand Omnipork announced a partnership with Starbucks in April to offer plant-based pork dishes that cater to an Asian palate. Nestle, the Swiss-based multinational food and drink giant, also announced plans to build a plant-based food plant in China.
    “It's a great opportunity to start educating and introducing this new option to the masses for the first time,” said Matilda Ho, founder and managing director of Shanghai-based food tech venture capital firm Bits x Bites. “There’s been growing interest among Chinese consumers about plant-based meat since last summer.”
    Demand has already been growing in the world’s second largest economy. China’s vegan food market is forecast to be worth nearly US$12 billion by 2023, up from just under US$10 billion in 2018, according to a report issued last year by Euromonitor International. Sales of plant-based meat in China increased from US$7.2 billion in 2014 to US$9.7 billion in 2018, according to the same report.
    “We believe that plant-based meat, as a new food technology, will transform the traditional food industry like the internet transformed traditional industries,” said Zhou Qiyu, marketing manager of Whole Perfect Food, a Shenzhen-based vegan food company founded in 1993.
    A number of factors are driving China’s shift to plant-based food tech. Before Covid-19, an outbreak of African swine fever led to massive culling of pigs, causing a surge in pork prices and rising concerns about food safety in the meat supply chain.
    Separately, the government wants to halve the country’s meat consumption by 2030 to cut carbon emissions and control obesity. Surveys have also found that Chinese consumers are becoming more open to a “flexitarian”, or mainly vegetarian, diet.
    Separate outbreaks of the coronavirus pandemic in two separate wholesale food markets – the original one in Wuhan in January and a second wave in Beijing in June – have also sparked consumer concern when it comes to meat consumption.


    3D printouts of plant-based meat could become alternative food for world’s population

    “Although people are now returning back to the normal routine after Covid-19, consumers are concerned about the potential link between meat products and the virus,” Bits x Bites’ Ho said. “Some are reducing their meat intake as a result. Many are preparing for the worst to come again.”
    While the pace of food tech deals in the capital market has slowed due to the pandemic, Ho said fundamental demand for meat alternatives and consumer preference for plant-based protein technologies are on the increase. Bits x Bites has invested in four alternative protein start-ups, and one company in its portfolio – Israeli chickpea protein specialist InnovoPro – raised US$15 million in its series B funding in April.
    Domestic food-tech players are also raising funds off the back of their innovative plant-based protein products. Shenzhen-based Starfield, founded last year, closed its latest funding round in March, attracting investment from Dao Foods and New Corp Capital, an early backer of Beyond Meat.
    Whole Perfect Food collaborated with Alibaba’s Tmall marketplace in June to launch low-fat, plant-based chicken sausages targeting fitness freaks. Zhenmeat, another Chinese start-up, is experimenting with 3D printed bones to insert into its plant-based meat products to make them seem more like real meat.
    Owing to its Buddhist culture, China has a long history of developing vegetarian dishes that mimic the taste of meat. Whole Perfect Food, one of the country’s biggest vegetarian food producers, generates almost 300 million yuan (US$43.2 million) annually from sales of products such as vegan shrimp and plant-based abalone sauce.


    Products from Beyond Meat are shown for sale at a market in Encinitas, California. Photo: Reuters

    However, compared to Western competitors, Chinese players still have a long way to go. California-based Impossible Foods uses genetic engineering to harvest soy leghemoglobin, or heme, in large volumes from yeast to make its products taste more like meat. Most of the Chinese-developed plant-based meat still has a strong bean taste, according to Zhou.
    Meanwhile, US companies have yet to develop technologies to mimic muscle fibre, which means current plant-based meat is limited to the forms of ground or minced meat, rather than beef steak or chicken breast. Western food tech companies also have not developed a convincing plant-based alternative to higher fat meat like pork, which accounts for more than 60 per cent of China’s total meat consumption.
    Chinese consumers also tend to care more about the texture of the meat, said Xue Yan, secretary general of the China Plant-Based Foods Alliance, one of the first organisations to represent the alternative protein sector in China. He expects to see more local start-ups developing technologies to improve the meat’s texture and coming out with products that cater to Chinese consumers.
    A bigger question for suppliers is whether Chinese consumer interest and curiosity will translate into repeat buying or brand loyalty, rather than one-off purchases.
    “There aren’t enough qualitative breakthroughs in global plant-based meat technology. Domestic consumers’ pursuit of taste and flavour is endless. That’s the greatest challenge for us,” said Zhou.
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips

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