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Thread: Shaolin in Hong Kong

  1. #1
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    Shaolin in Hong Kong

    Shaolin on Lantau Island, HK

    This isn't a tour. It's an ongoing show at a fixed location. What's more, it's not Shaolin monks. It's Shaolin masters. That's an important distinction as it implies this has no 'official' status. It's a sideshow at a popular tourist site: Lantau Island in HK.

    Glorious Return of Shaolin Showcase

    Shaolin Kung Fu Showcase 2011
    Date: 1 July to 31 August 2011
    Venue: Ngong Ping Village

    Performance Content: There is Kung Fu acts by Shaolin Masters such as movements on the Poles of Plum Blossoms, Overhead Kicks and the Praying Mantis Fists, etc. The performance is more amazing, exciting and breathtaking than ever.

    Shaolin Qixingquan Training

    Call (852) 3666 0606 to enrol in the FREE Qixingquan training taught by Shaolin masters!
    Book your cable car tickets online to enjoy fast lane pick up too!

    Timetable for Shaolin Performance

    Monday - Friday
    12:30-13:00 Kung Fu Master Performance at Ngong Ping
    13:10-13:20 Photo-taking session
    13:50-14:05 Shaolin Qixingquan Training
    15:00-15:30 Kung Fu Master Performance at Ngong Ping
    15:40-15:50 Photo-taking session

    Saturday, Sunday & Public Holidays
    12:30-13:00 Kung Fu Master Performance at Ngong Ping
    13:10-13:20 Photo-taking session
    13:50-14:05 Shaolin Qixingquan Training
    14:55-15:25 Kung Fu Master Performance at Ngong Ping
    15:35-15:45 Photo-taking session
    16:15-16:30 Shaolin Qixingquan Training

    * The above schedule is subject to change without prior notice.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #2
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    More on Lantau masters...

    Shaolin Masters Set to Showcase Their Stunt Skills in Hong Kong
    By Rory Boland, About.com Guide July 28, 2011


    Shades of Bruce Lee in Hong Kong this month as twenty Shaolin Masters from China descend on the city to flaunt their Kung Fu skills. The masters are promising to unroll the kind of jaw dropping martial art stunts seen in films such as Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon and familiar to fans of Bruce Lee, Jet Li or Jackie Chan; all Hong Kong natives. Not only will they be taking to the stage but they'll also be holding workshops to show would be Karate Kids how to perform a Seven Star Fist and Handstand Hoist - thus ensuring any futures disputes over the TV remote are settled in your favor.

    The setting for the Shaolin Showcase is up at Ngong Ping on Lantau Island. Now, let's be clear, while we're huge fans of the Ngong Ping cable car and its superb vistas over Lantau and the South China Sea, we're far less enthusiastic about the ambitiously named Ngong Ping cultural village; a cynical exercise in tourist exploitation where the only culture you'll find is Starbucks, Subway and various overpriced shops. But credit is due to Ngong Ping for organizing something truly cultural. This is a rare opportunity to see martial arts masters in action, live and up close.

    The event runs throughout July until August 31st and entry is free, although practically speaking you'll need to take the Ngong Ping cable car to reach the village. Times for shows and workshops depend on the day, with the Ngong Ping website providing detailed timetable information. If you do see the show and fancy yourself as a future martial arts master, why not try learning martial arts in Hong Kong.
    As we've already observed, 2010 has been all about qixing, but Handstand Hoist? I'm glad they're consistent about their use of "masters" instead of monks.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #3
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    I decided to split this off into its own thread

    It's still all about qixing, isn't it?
    Jetsetting with ... Shaolin master Yan Kang
    by Serene Lim
    04:45 AM Jul 30, 2011


    You don't have to go to a Shaolin temple to learn the secrets of Shaolin kung fu. Shaolin master Yan Kang and his team are currently at Hong Kong Lantau Island's Ngong Ping 360 for a summer showcase, which has proven to be quite a hit so far.

    "Guests at Ngong Ping Village enjoy interacting with us and are also extremely enthusiastic in learning Shaolin kung fu," revealed the 36-year-old, who is chief instructor of the Hong Kong Shaolin Wushu Culture. "By practising qixingquan in the free-of-charge interactive kung fu workshops, we hope the guests can learn to appreciate the power and essence of traditional Chinese martial arts."

    And it's not just tourists and movie-goers who've fallen for Shaolin kung fu; the master has also taught the daughters of Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. And he encourages more people to take it up not just for its physical benefits.

    "Kung fu emphasises moral development ... Wholesome qualities such as endurance, perseverance, discipline, loyalty and a calm disposition are prerequisites for progress and are transferable to daily life."

    We could all do with more of that.

    Why do you think Shaolin kung fu is so popular?

    Shaolin kung fu is rich in substance with literally hundreds of routines. According to the quan pu, or Shaolin boxing manuals, there are 708 sets of kung fu, in which 217 are Shaolin signature routines.

    There's also the hit TV series Kung Fu (1972 to 1975) with David Carradine starring as half-Chinese, half-Caucasian Shaolin monk Kwai Chang Caine, which helped popularise the martial arts and Eastern philosophy in the West.

    So how accurate are these depictions of Shaolin kung fu?

    Shaolin kung fu is sometimes dramatised in movies for the purpose of entertainment. For example, running on rooftops and "never-dying fights". However, I am sure that most film directors would have done some background research and sought advice from Shaolin kung fu masters before they started filming the movies.

    Where have you travelled to showcase Shaolin kung fu and what do you like most about travelling?

    I have travelled to different parts of China and Russia, as well as many major cities like Hong Kong. What I love most about travelling is sharing and promoting the art of Shaolin kung fu, and interacting with local people from different places in the world. I also like the fact that I can be part of a larger Chinese community that promotes this Chinese cultural heritage in the international arena.

    Do you practise your Shaolin kung fu even when you travel?

    Yes, I never fail to practise it daily as it's conducive to leading a healthier lifestyle both mentally and physically. You're able to sleep more soundly and work energetically. You build fitness also in terms of the ability to react quickly, to endure hard work and to concentrate without mental fatigue.

    Any other health tips for being on the road?

    Get up early, have a balanced diet, exercise regularly and go to bed early. That's what we call a good healthy lifestyle. My team and I follow this practice strictly.

    Ngong Ping 360's Shaolin kung fu showcase ends on Aug 31. For details, visit www.np360.com.hk.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #4
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    I've changed the title of this thread

    It was Shaolin on Lantau Island HK; it's now Shaolin in Hong Kong

    RECORD CROWDS THRONG TO PARKS
    Thursday, February 14, 2013

    Thousands of residents and tourists had their holidays ruined when Ocean Park suspended the sale of tickets for the second successive day because of excessive crowds.

    The two-day shutout at the popular theme park sparked renewed calls yesterday for more tourism attractions and infrastructure to meet an increasing number of visitors.

    Crowd management measures were implemented to control admissions to the park, though those celebrating their birthdays, senior citizens aged 65 and over who enjoy free entry, and annual pass holders were not affected.

    A spokeswoman said the number of visitors on Tuesday surpassed the 2011 daily record of 48,000.

    She added that when guests reach 28,000 to 32,000, the park usually makes an announcement persuading visitors to return another day.

    "Our regulation is that not more than 36,600 can appear in the park at the same time,'' she said.

    Visitors to Disneyland also complained that they spent a long time in queues to get rides.

    A spokeswoman said Disneyland recorded its highest number of visitors for a single day on Tuesday, while yesterday's crowd was the second highest. She did not mention the figures.

    The tourism sector has called for an increase in the number of attractions and has opposed limiting the number of visitors through administrative measures.

    Tourism sector lawmaker Yiu Si-wing said it is time to review Hong Kong's ability to receive visitors and agreed on suggestions to develop more attractions in districts such as the islands.

    Yiu also suggested reviewing the maximum attendance at Ocean Park and Disneyland.

    "In the short term we can improve the notifi dhcation system by making announcements at border crossings so that visitors can adjust their itineraries,'' he said. "In the long term, there should be more attractions in order to disperse the visitors. For example, we can improve facilities in the islands to attract visitors.

    "Building a Shaolin monastery in Sai Kung, which has been reported, is also a good idea.''


    Yiu opposed limiting the number of visitors with administrative measures, saying this will have a prolonged impact on the economy.

    "Once you stop visitors from coming, it will be hard to get them back.''

    Travel Industry Council executive director Joseph Tung Yao-chung welcomed the construction of more attractions but said this will take time.

    A spokeswoman for the Hong Kong Tourism Board said it has not received complaints about overcrowding at attractions.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #5
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    Hijacking this thread, wiz cool c

    We need a good 'Children in Shaolin' thread. Did your summer program succeed last summer?

    Forget iPads and video games – how about kung fu for Hong Kong children?
    Parents who have signed up their kids swear by martial arts to instil discipline and promote physical well-being
    PUBLISHED : Sunday, 22 October, 2017, 3:25pm
    UPDATED : Monday, 23 October, 2017, 2:50pm
    Raymond Yeung



    In one synchronised motion, they punch the air with their fists, keeping their feet firmly planted on the ground, their brows furrowed in intense concentration as part of a Chinese martial arts showcase.
    But the fierce wushu demonstration comes from unlikely pint-sized performers – these are four to five-year-old Hong Kong children from a kindergarten in North Point.
    Leading a separate charge is an older 12-strong troupe of masters from the Shaolin Monastery, a Buddhist temple in Henan province famed for its martial arts training.

    The masters were invited by cable car operator Ngong Ping 360 to perform and conduct workshops for a month on Lantau Island, while the children, who also came to display their skills, are from a martial arts course organised by a local kindergarten.
    Ten parents watch proudly as their little ones strut their kung fu stuff on stage. The show caps the grand finale of martial arts training for the children, who signed up a year ago.
    In this age, allowing children ample time for physical exercise – in between tedious school work and extracurricular activities – can be quite a challenge.
    In a city where the young are given electronic devices even before turning one, as found by a government survey in August, there have been concerns over the physical development of children.
    And kung fu lessons may be the perfect solution.
    Sam Wong, who enrolled his son Nicholas into a basic course early this year, said the changes had been remarkable.
    “At first he would cry and refuse to head for class. But gradually he got comfortable and it was all positive from there onwards,” Wong said, adding that his son had become braver and more outgoing.
    “It’s a group activity, so he gets to socialise with his classmates. They also have to obey instructions, so he has learned to be more disciplined as well.”


    Shaolin kung fu masters performing at Ngong Ping on Lantau Island. Photo: Edward Wong

    Fellow parent Simon Kan had similar observations. “My daughter has become more confident and courageous … I don’t think kung fu is just for boys. She now looks forward to every class,” Kan said.
    Meanwhile, the 12-strong Shaolin troupe said there were plenty of health benefits for practising martial arts.
    Zhang Yuchao, the oldest at 22, has been training since he was seven. “There are many elements – coordination, stamina, strength, just to name a few,” he said.
    Wong Tung-tai, principal of St Paul’s Church Kindergarten, organiser of the children’s course, said she came up with the idea after teachers had signed up for a similar class provided by a vendor as part of a mental well-being programme for staff.


    Kids from St Paul's Church Kindergarten meet Shaolin kung fu masters at a showcase. Photo: Edward Wong

    “The kung fu masters told me that such lessons are not only for adults, so we set up two classes for our children,” she said.
    The overwhelming response has prompted her to set up a third class this school year, with about 90 pupils now in the programme.
    “We want the children to learn to be focused and well-behaved. We don’t want them to use kung fu moves to bully their peers, so discipline is an integral part of the lesson,” she said.
    This Children's program is in Hong Kong's Lantau Island facility.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #6
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    And we're back

    Shaolin kung fu returns
    Martial arts masters are back on Lantau Island to display their skills
    YP cadet Justin Leung | 9:07am, 24 Jul, 2011


    Shaolin kung fu takes centre stage this summer with the return of martial art demonstrations in the Shaolin Showcase at Ngong Ping Village on Lantau Island.

    Twenty Shaolin masters will perform martial art moves made famous in action films and also conduct workshops where visitors can learn and experience the true spirit of Shaolin kung fu.

    The name Shaolin kung fu is used to describe the different Chinese martial arts associated with the Shaolin Monastery. It's a Buddhist temple founded in the fifth century at Song Shan, a sacred mountain in Dengfeng, Henan province.

    The shaven-headed kung fu masters at Ngong Ping Village - the terminus of the Ngong Ping 360 cable car from Tung Chung - are all students at a kung fu school in Dongguan, Guangdong. "We don't just study kung fu at school," says Li Shengjuan, 21, one of the Shaolin masters. "We study regular subjects, such as mathematics and Chinese, in addition to kung fu training.

    "In Chinese we say, wen wu quan cai ... we must study both martial arts and normal academic subjects at the same time in order to improve."

    The students' academic routine resembles, in part, the demanding, disciplined lifestyle of Shaolin monks. "We wake up at 5am and work out for two hours," says Li, who rarely has a day off. "We then go to school in the morning and go back to our kung fu training in the afternoon and evening."

    Hu Gao, who heads the team of Shaolin masters at Ngong Ping Village, says: "It is true that the students have a tougher life than other people of their age. They have very little time to relax because practising kung fu is extremely time consuming and tough.

    "They rip their clothes several times a day during training and have to change regularly. It shows how tough it is for them."

    Li, who joined the school at the age of 14 because of his love for kung fu, is very much focused on the martial art.

    To improve, he believes he needs to keep learning and exercising.

    When he does have some spare time for himself, he likes playing basketball. "Kung fu is a kind of sport, so it is natural that I would prefer to do sports in my free time, as well," Li says.

    The group of Shaolin masters at Ngong Ping has been in Hong Kong several times before to give performances and promote the Shaolin culture. "Doing this Shaolin showcase doesn't affect our daily training routine at all," says Hu. "We still train hard during these performances in order to push ourselves to do better."

    Li says the demonstrations and workshops are of interest to people from many countries around the world. "Shaolin kung fu has more than 1,500 years of history; it is our duty to spread the culture and offer people a chance to get to know more about it," he says.

    Hu urged local kung fu enthusiasts to train more and improve their fitness to help promote the culture in Hong Kong.

    For more details about Shaolin kung fu, go to www.np360.com.hk

    Join Shaolin kung fu workshop
    Young Post is inviting five readers to attend the Ngong Ping "Shaolin Kung Fu Showcase 2011" on August 5. Participants can enjoy a performance by kung fu masters, learn kung fu as part of Shaolin Qixingquan Training and interview the kung fu masters.

    Interested junior reporters can send an e-mail, with their name, school, phone number and an explanation about why they love kung fu, to reporters.club@scmp.com no later than Friday (July 29). Put "Kung Fu" in the subject field.

    This workshop is open to junior reporters only. To join the Young Post Reporters' Club, visit this page.
    That final link doesn't work in the original article.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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