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Thread: Kung fu or tai chi in Seoul Korea..

  1. #1
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    Kung fu or tai chi in Seoul Korea..

    Hi everyone, I am moving to Seoul Korea in a few months and was wondering if anyone knows any kung fu or tai chi instructors in Seoul Korea. I tried researching on my own but find it difficult to locate any instructors there.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Have you considered some 'Korean' arts with a Chinese back ground like Kuk Sool Won? Its a very balanced style with Chinese animals.
    "if its ok for shaolin wuseng to break his vow then its ok for me to sneak behind your house at 3 in the morning and bang your dog if buddha is in your heart then its ok"-Bawang

    "I get what you have said in the past, but we are not intuitive fighters. As instinctive fighters, we can chuck spears and claw and bite. We are not instinctively god at punching or kicking."-Drake

    "Princess? LMAO hammer you are such a pr^t"-Frost

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkim680 View Post
    Hi everyone, I am moving to Seoul Korea in a few months and was wondering if anyone knows any kung fu or tai chi instructors in Seoul Korea. I tried researching on my own but find it difficult to locate any instructors there.

    thanks
    Hi,

    it seems that there's a Hao jia Tanglang (郝家螳螂) school in Seul (Gwanak-gu).

    their website: http://www.hakgamun.com/

    film about this mantis boxing school: http://www.sciencetv.kr/_comm/pop_mo...03221342057548

  4. #4
    Search for Ship Pal Gey, sip par gey or various other ways of spelling the same.

    It means 18 weapons, and refers to Chinese arts that descended from Shaolin.

  5. #5

    like it says on the box..

    Korean Kung Fu (Sip Pal Gi)

    We teach a rare Traditional Northern Shaolin Longfist Mantis system that is very prevalent in South Korea (sometimes referred to as Sip Pal Gi).
    Sip Pal Gi (short for Sip Pal Ban Byung Gi) can be translated as “The 18 Weapons System” or “The 18 Skills System.” The other name that most Koreans recognize is “So Rim Kwon Bup (Shaolin Quan Fa in Chinese)” which means Shaolin Fist Method in Korean.

    The system is authentic traditional Northern Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu. When the Shaolin Temples in China were being burned many monks fled for refuge in other countries. Many of the monks from the Shantung Province fled to Korea. Shantung Province in China is famous for its Praying Mantis and this is why many Kung Fu systems taught in Korea claim to have a Northern Praying Mantis lineage.

    Upon relocating to Korea, a few of the Chinese monks befriended some of the local Korean Masters and shared their Kung Fu with these masters. In the early 60’s and 70’s a few of the Korean masters relocated to the United States and began teaching this art to Americans.

    This is why the art is usually taught by Korean Masters in America. The most notable living Korean Master is Grand Master Lee Duk Gang (Lee De Jiang in Chinese) who lives in Seoul, Korea.Grand Master Lee Duk Gang (pictured above to the right) was born in the city of Yantai, Shantung Province. He is still teaching daily in Seoul, Korea in his late 70's.

    Two other Masters in Korea are Grand Master Seung Un Seung and Grand Master Doo Hak Jae. These 3 masters were the Masters of Grand Master Byong Yil Choi who came to the United States in 1971 and settled in Los Angeles. Grand Master Hi Seup Na also studied with Grand Master Choi in Korea before coming to the United States, as well as with two other Masters in Korea, One of which was a prominent Praying Mantis Master.

    Grand Master Byong Yil Choi and Grand Master Hi Seup Na are my immediate Masters although I originally learned the art from Grand Master Young Pyo Choi before meeting Grand Masters Byong Yil Choi (no relation) and Hi Seup Na in California.

    Sip Pal Gi is Traditional Northern Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu with a slight Praying Mantis influence. Some systems of Kung Fu taught in Korea tend to focus more on this element while others will focus more on the Long Fist elements of the art. Still others incorporate elements of Bagua Kung Fu.

    There are small pockets of these schools spread out across the United States (many of them do not know of the existence of each other outside their own schools). It has been my mission since 1996 to unite these practitioners and to research and proliferate this art.

    This Kung Fu system has been validated by some very high ranking Chinese masters in the United States and I have personally been told, through these masters (by viewing our forms and basics) that our system is Pure, Traditional Shaolin Longfist and that few changes or modifications have been made to the style by the Korean masters who learned the art.

    Sip Pal Gi is considered an “external” style of Kung Fu. Most schools also teach Traditional Tae Geuk Kwon (Tai Chi Quan, an internal art) to help balance out the art. The majority of Sip Pal Gi schools teach the Yang style of Tai Chi and generally teach the 24-Step Yang form and/or the 48-Combined form.

    Weapons training also plays a large part of Sip Pal Gi (hence the translation “18 weapons”) - Ban Byung in Korean is translated as “Weapons.” The full name of the system we teach is sometimes known as "Sip Pal Ban Byung Gi." Many American instructors mistakenly spell the word Sip as "Ship ."

    In Korean language “Si” is pronounced “SH.” Many American instructors are not aware of this and since the word is “pronounced” SHIP, it is commonly misspelled. Other spellings can include Shippalgi, Sib Pal Ki, Shippal Gi, Sippalki.

    It should also be noted that there is another system of Sip Pal Gi that dates back to a book, written in Korea's Royal Palace days that refers to an art called Sip Pal Gi. There is a group in Korea that has attempted to recreate this art. This art is not the same art as the one discussed here. There are some similarities to many of the techniques and even some of he basics, but that's as far as it goes. There is also an art taught in Argentina by a famous Master known as Park Bok Nam. This particular style bears no resemblance to the art mentioned here.

    Sip in Korean means “TEN.” Pal means “Eight.” Sip Pal then means “Eighteen.” Gi or Ki means “Energy or Power (the Chinese call it “Chi”) It can also be translated to mean "Technique," since the Korean Character for "Ki" is the same for both "Energy and Technique." The actual Chinese translation is "Technique."

    Sip Pal Gi has very distinct basic stances such as Horse, Mountain, Small Mountain, Four-Six Stance, Crane (or single leg), Cat (or empty), Mantis (or stretching stance or drop stance) and scissor stance (or twisting stance).

    Tan Tui (Tan Tei or Dam Doi in Korean) is also practiced in Sip Pal Gi. Tan Tui (Springy Legs) is the backbone of the system and contains all the basic elements of the entire system in 12 Roads (or Tangs) which are basically short forms consisting of 2 to 4 movements that are repeated in line drill fashion at the beginning of each class to help the practitioner develop his basic skills and endurance.

    Most Sip Pal Gi systems have one particular empty hand form called “So Ho Yun Kwon (Xiao Hu Yan Quan in Chinese) which can be translated as “Little Flying Tiger.” This is probably the most popular form in the world in the Traditional Northern Shaolin Kung Fu World and versions of it can be found in Northern Praying Mantis systems as well as many Tang Soo Do and Traditional Tae Kwon Do systems as well. The form is known for its raw power and its signature blocking techniques.

    When it comes to weapons nearly all Sip Pal Gi practitioners learn a special Broad Sword form called “O Ken Yan Do” which is loosely translated to mean “5 harmonies Broadsword.” Yan Do” in Korean means “Broad Sword” (Darn Dao in Chinese). “O” means “Five” in Korean. The word Ken (spelling may be incorrect although this is the spelling given to me by my Masters) is a word that all of my Masters were somewhat uncertain of but which is thought to mean something like “Harmony.” This particular Broadsword form is usually taught later in the curriculum after the Basic Broadsword form is taught (Kibon Yan Do, Chuji Darn Dao, in Chinese)). The form can be immediately recognized by a special “Chicken” walk in which the practitioner is cutting his opponent and then shaking the blood from the blade as he walks in a circle. It is a very beautiful form and is usually the staple Broadsword form for most students of Sip Pal Gi.

    The art of Sip Pal Gi includes a total of 18 different Chinese weapons which include the 4 Core weapons of Long Staff, Broadsword, Spear and Straight Sword and also include all the flexible weapons such as the 9-Section Chain Whip, Rope Dart and 3-Section Staff as well as the Iron Fan, Kwan Dao and Pu Dao, along with several other weapons.

    Sip Pal Gi is known for its powerful low stances and devastating strikes with the inner and outer wrist. Iron Body conditioning to both sides of the wrist is a staple part of the Sip Pal Gi practitioner’s training and these areas of the body are developed into deadly weapons by the time a student reaches Black Sash. Many of the forms highlight strikes with these two areas of the arm to help teach the student proper use in real self-defense.

    Chin Na is also practiced in most Sip Pal Gi schools. Chin Na (Kum Na in Korean) is the art of Seizing and this is the art that gave birth to Hapkido and Aikido. It is a very complex art and takes many years to master it. Praying Mantis Kung Fu is closely related to Chin Na as well and is where you will see some of the influence in Sip Pal Gi through the practice of several traditional 2-Man sets.

    The art of Sip Pal Gi is a very comprehensive Martial Art and also includes Dynamic Tension training (known in Korean as Dan Jun Hohup) which involves use of the famed “8 Section Brocade” as a warm up to most classes. In these exercises the student learns to cultivate his Chi (Ki in Korean) and learns how to direct his Chi into his movements to help improve health and strength through dynamic tension of muscles and breathing while executing very simple movements on either side of the body.

    There are also many flashy jump kicks taught in Sip Pal Gi which are included in several of the upper ranking and Black Sash forms that are included to help the student develop explosiveness and stamina.

    The art of Tae Kwon Do is a direct descendant of Northern Shaolin Kung Fu and all of the Kicks of Tae Kwon Do, along with many kicks not familiar to a Tae Kwon Do practitioner, in Sip Pal Gi.

    Once a student of Tae Kwon Do has learned the art of Sip Pal Gi he will have a much deeper understanding of his kicking and his basic movements as performed in his forms.

    The sparring aspect of Sip Pal Gi is more of a natural combat type of sparring in which a student will incorporate sweeps and take downs, strikes to the face, body and legs and will make use of open and closed hand strikes as well as multiple types of kicks.

    http://www.ltkfa.com/index.cfm?page=15

    R

  6. #6
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    I don't know what Kuk Sool Won is, but it isn't Chinese Martial Arts. I'd explore other options.
    www.kungnation.com

    Pre-order Kung! Twisted Barbarian Felony from your favorite comic shop!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by R View Post
    The system is authentic traditional Northern Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu. When the Shaolin Temples in China were being burned many monks fled for refuge in other countries. Many of the monks from the Shantung Province fled to Korea. Shantung Province in China is famous for its Praying Mantis and this is why many Kung Fu systems taught in Korea claim to have a Northern Praying Mantis lineage.

    Upon relocating to Korea, a few of the Chinese monks befriended some of the local Korean Masters and shared their Kung Fu with these masters. In the early 60’s and 70’s a few of the Korean masters relocated to the United States and began teaching this art to Americans.
    Anyone else think there is something a bit funny with the timeline? Were they burning the Shaolin Temples in the 1940/50s?

  8. #8
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    Wow thanks for the info..

    My goal in Korea is to find a wu style tai chi chuan teacher and someone who teaches the southern kung fu arts. My background is in wing chun and I wanted to actually look for someone who teaches southern mantis or bak mei. I think this might be difficult task since even in the U.S. its hard to find teachers who openly teach these styles.

    I have heard of kuk sool won. I actually took hwa rang do while I was living in CA and there are more similarities than differences between the two.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Mas Judt View Post
    I don't know what Kuk Sool Won is, but it isn't Chinese Martial Arts. I'd explore other options.
    It's like Hwarang Do, and claims to be the Royal art. We used to have a group in Chicago back in the day. They would compete in these black uniforms, with Gold foil trim and patches galore. They were big on deep stances and such, and had flowing almost Kung Fu likeish forms.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by R View Post
    Korean Kung Fu (Sip Pal Gi)

    We teach a rare Traditional Northern Shaolin Longfist Mantis system that is very prevalent in South Korea (sometimes referred to as Sip Pal Gi).
    Sip Pal Gi (short for Sip Pal Ban Byung Gi) can be translated as “The 18 Weapons System” or “The 18 Skills System.” The other name that most Koreans recognize is “So Rim Kwon Bup (Shaolin Quan Fa in Chinese)” which means Shaolin Fist Method in Korean.

    The system is authentic traditional Northern Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu. When the Shaolin Temples in China were being burned many monks fled for refuge in other countries. Many of the monks from the Shantung Province fled to Korea. Shantung Province in China is famous for its Praying Mantis and this is why many Kung Fu systems taught in Korea claim to have a Northern Praying Mantis lineage.
    Do you teach this set?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8JJ76Fjl70
    Last edited by RD'S Alias - 1A; 09-05-2011 at 10:48 AM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RD'S Alias - 1A View Post
    It's like Hwarang Do, and claims to be the Royal art. We used to have a group in Chicago back in the day. They would compete in these black uniforms, with Gold foil trim and patches galore. They were big on deep stances and such, and had flowing almost Kung Fu likeish forms.
    Exactly...here is a good demo of the style, you'll clearly see its Kung Fu influences. Its really a blend of Chinese and Korean arts.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rUNv5FhtRL0
    "if its ok for shaolin wuseng to break his vow then its ok for me to sneak behind your house at 3 in the morning and bang your dog if buddha is in your heart then its ok"-Bawang

    "I get what you have said in the past, but we are not intuitive fighters. As instinctive fighters, we can chuck spears and claw and bite. We are not instinctively god at punching or kicking."-Drake

    "Princess? LMAO hammer you are such a pr^t"-Frost

    www.ao8training.com/

  12. #12
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    It looks like if you took all the principles that make CMA work out of CMA, KSW is what CMA would look like.
    www.kungnation.com

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  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Mas Judt View Post
    It looks like if you took all the principles that make CMA work out of CMA, KSW is what CMA would look like.
    Sort of. Mix in random Karate and judo stuff, and you have it.

    It's like watered down Chung Do Mu Sul Won. That is Chinese martial arts, that have been Koreanified.

    In my mind, the Korean schools are organized in the following Hierarchy.

    1. Sip Pal Gey, which is Chinese martial arts like North mantis, Bagua, and Shandong Long Fist. I see the quality as being kind of low compared to the mainland Chinese originals...sort of like a few photocopies down the line.

    2. Chung Do Mu Sul Won, which appears to be the Koreanified Chinese arts only with all thier own forms and stuff.

    3. Kook Sul Won - Watered down Chung Do Su Sul Won.

    4. Hwarang Do - Hapkido mostly, with a bunch of thier own stuff inspired by the 3 above.

    5 Kong Su Do - Japanese Karate taught in Korea.

    6 Tang Su Do - same as above, only a different name.

    7. TKD, actually came from 5 and 6 but in reality it is the half failed attempt to resurrect the long dead kicking art of Tae Kyon using Japanese martial arts as a base so the Koreans can claim a native Korean art form....

    8. Tae Kyon - Extinct art where people try to kick each others feet out from under them for the win.
    Last edited by RD'S Alias - 1A; 09-05-2011 at 08:00 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkim680 View Post
    Hi everyone, I am moving to Seoul Korea in a few months and was wondering if anyone knows any kung fu or tai chi instructors in Seoul Korea. I tried researching on my own but find it difficult to locate any instructors there.

    thanks
    Lee De Jiang (Lee Duk Kang) is in Seoul. He's pretty much the authority in South Korea. Most everyone has either studied with him or one of his students, at some point.

    Korea's Chinese WuShu Association
    4F 12-2 DaeHungDohng, MahPohGoo,
    Seoul 121-080 Korea.


    There is an article about his style in this issue:



    Some pics of the school:





    Last edited by MasterKiller; 09-06-2011 at 07:29 AM.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by CFT View Post
    Anyone else think there is something a bit funny with the timeline? Were they burning the Shaolin Temples in the 1940/50s?
    It's all just heresay. Chinese martial arts were brought to South Korea by Chinese expatriots during the 40s and 50s.
    He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher. -- Walt Whitman

    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
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