Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 76 to 79 of 79

Thread: Water

  1. #76
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,803

    Real Water lawsuit

    More on Real Water

    May 11, 2021, 1:52 PM
    Real Water faces lawsuit after 5-year-old girl gets seriously ill: "It was excruciating"


    Many people buy bottled water because they believe it's healthier but federal investigators are now looking into questions about one particular brand of bottled water sold in several states.

    In a YouTube video, Real Water founder Brent Jones said the benefits of his company's bottled alkaline water include "assisting with better cellular hydration and creating an antioxidant effect on the body."

    The water was sold nationwide and the company offered home delivery of five-gallon bottles in Las Vegas to people like Ryan and Arika Carrier. The family says they thought they were getting the best water that they could drink and liked the taste of it. Their 2-year-old son Finn and 5-year-old daughter Hera drank it too, but last year, Hera started getting sick.

    "Constant complaining, 'Mommy, my tummy hurts. I don't feel good,'" Arika told CBS News national consumer investigative correspondent Anna Werner.

    Then in November, Hera got violently ill and couldn't hold food down. She soon became incoherent and was rushed to a local hospital.

    "You don't know what's going on with your daughter. You're putting her in the back of the car, limp in the car seat. It was excruciating, excruciating," Ryan said.

    When she arrived at the hospital, Doctors told Arika the 5-year-old's liver was failing. They said that they couldn't treat her there, and Hera would need to be life-flighted to Salt Lake City for a possible liver transplant. Doctors in Salt Lake City told the Carriers their daughter had ingested something highly toxic.

    "It's absolutely like going into shock, you know, thinking that your 5-year-old might need a transplant," Arika tearfully recalled.

    "Not many things make you fall on your knees in life, right? We fell to our knees. Right? We all prayed," Ryan added.

    Their prayers were answered, and Hera avoided a transplant.

    But it wasn't just their child. Over just 11 days, health authorities said five children between the ages of seven months and five years became ill – all at risk of needing liver transplants. Health officials say the "only common link between all the identified cases" was "the consumption of Real Water brand alkaline water."

    In March, the company announced a nationwide voluntary recall of its Real Water brand alkaline water.

    Werner went to Real Water's company office to ask whether the company knew what happened to those children, but their office was empty with just a few trucks sitting outside. The company later declined CBS News' request for an interview. But online, Jones said, "We'd like to express our deepest sympathy and concern over the events that led to the inquiry."

    In a video posted to his website in March, Jones apologized to his customers and announced a nationwide recall of all Real Water that would last until the safety of the products is "clearly established."

    But a videotaped deposition of a former Real Water employee, obtained by CBS News, raises serious questions about how the company made the water last fall.

    Casey Aiken, who was hired by Real Water after working for strip clubs, said he had no experience in chemistry and only a couple of hours of what he called "hands-on training." But he was the one in charge of mixing a liquid concentrate into the water at the company's offices outside Las Vegas.

    Aiken said in September or October, he was mixing a new batch in the tanks and got a low reading on a meter he was using to measure the water's alkalinity level. So he called his manager, Brent Jones' son Blaine, to ask what to do and was told to add more concentrate.

    "And he didn't tell you how much?" Aiken was asked during the deposition. "No, he didn't tell me how much," he replied.

    Aiken said he decided to add two and a half more gallons of the concentrate to the water. Aiken said during the deposition that he wouldn't think that adding more concentrate than usually used would potentially cause a problem with the water.

    "If I'm putting into somebody that's ingesting it, I would think that it's safe no matter what," he laughed. "That's my thought."

    The FDA is still investigating, but consumer advocates say the situation shows the need for stronger regulations for bottled water.

    "It really is sort of the Wild West out there with a lot of smaller bottlers facing very infrequent, if any, inspections and testing by the government," Erik Olson, senior director, Natural Resources Defense Council, Inc. said.

    That's why the Carriers say they're speaking out and say they want people to be aware. "This can't happen to any more people. It's happened to enough. It's happened to enough," Ryan said.

    The Carriers have filed a lawsuit against Real Water.

    "We aren't going to leave any stone unturned", said the Carriers' attorney, Colby Williams, of Campbell and Williams in Las Vegas. "Clearly there was a problem with the way either this water was manufactured, the way that it was tested or the way that it was dispensed."

    In a court filing, the company denied the allegations.
    I just got into alkaline water. Our local purifier provides it (I don't get it from Real Water). I rather like it. It settles my stomach if I have indigestion and has a silkier mouth feel.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #77
    Researchers show that alkaline water provides other extra great benefits that regular tap or bottled water lack.

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,803

    NASA-certified

    Quote Originally Posted by highlypotion View Post
    Researchers show that alkaline water provides other extra great benefits that regular tap or bottled water lack.
    And what do researchers show about NASA-certified water?

    Scammers in China Sold Bottles of ‘NASA-Certified’ Water for $160 Each
    The pyramid scheme saw people touting a miracle liquid that supposedly helps with weight loss, diabetes, and even cancer.
    By Koh Ewe
    June 1, 2021, 12:50am


    PHOTO: JONATHAN CHNG, UNSPLASH
    Among the most expensive liquids in the world, many have good reason to boast hefty price tags. But in a recent case in China, bottles of ridiculously priced “NASA-certified” water turned out to be just regular water, and part of a massive multi-level marketing scheme.

    Chinese authorities recently indicted a company named Zhongzichuanglian for operating the pyramid scheme, state-run legal news outlet Procuratorial Daily reported in May.

    The company, which operated from 2016 to 2018 and had over 49,000 members, made nearly 900 million Chinese yuan ($141 million) in revenue, most notably through a water product known as “SSG Life Mineral Liquid” that was supposedly certified by the United States’ aeronautics and space agency. Sold in boxes of 15, each 35 milliliter bottle of water cost 1,000 yuan ($160) and claimed to cure various ailments and help people retain youthful vigor. A police investigation later found that it was merely regular groundwater, state-run publication National Business Daily reported.

    The case came to light in 2019, when a series of police reports were lodged against the company, after victims of the pyramid scheme realized that they had been scammed. According to Chinese news outlet Legal Daily, members were told that they could enjoy a rebate of 100,000 yuan ($15,700) after spending 150,000 yuan ($23,600) worth of products.

    But the cashback reportedly never came, and the water proved useless against its incredible health promises—backed by Nobel Prize winners, or so the company claimed—that included weight loss, a diabetes cure, and cancer treatment.

    Despite the supposed all-healing properties of the SSG Life Mineral Liquid, the company claimed that consuming the water by itself can only achieve 70 percent of its effectiveness. To reap its full benefits, customers were encouraged to undergo floating therapy, a service offered by a subsidiary company that runs float centers and sells other wellness products like face masks and pain relief patches. One floating therapy session would cost members 298 yuan ($47).

    Members were classified into levels differentiated by the amount of their profits. To boost membership, the company implemented a variety of rewards policies, incentivizing existing members to rake in new ones. The company reportedly also promoted itself by claiming that it used blockchain technology.

    According to Procuratorial Daily, 17 people have been indicted in relation to the pyramid scheme. The leaders of the scheme, identified only by their last names Yan and Wang, have been sentenced to 10 years in prison with a 1 million yuan ($157,000) fine, and eight years and six months in prison with a fine of 900,000 yuan ($141,000), respectively.

    Follow Koh Ewe on Instagram.
    threads
    Water
    Chinese-Counterfeits-Fakes-amp-Knock-Offs
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,803

    Blocked

    The Real Water lawsuit

    Judge permanently blocks marketing of bottled-water brand
    A U.S. judge has permanently blocked a Las Vegas-based bottled-water brand Real Water from being marketed while an investigation continues into at least one death and multiple cases of liver illness among people who reported drinking it

    ByThe Associated Press
    June 1, 2021, 6:18 PM
    • 2 min read

    LAS VEGAS -- A U.S. judge has permanently blocked a Las Vegas-based bottled-water brand Real Water from being marketed while an investigation continues into at least one death and multiple cases of liver illness among people who reported drinking it.

    A court order signed Monday by U.S. District Judge Jennifer Dorsey formalizes a settlement in which AffinityLivestyles.com Inc., Real Water Inc. and company officers agreed to stop processing and distributing the product drawn from municipal tap water, and destroy any in their possession.

    Company president Brent Jones, a former Nevada state Republican lawmaker, and attorneys for him and the company didn't immediately respond to messages seeking comment.

    Real Water was marketed primarily in Nevada, Arizona, Utah and California.

    The Justice Department said Tuesday that defendants including Jones assured the court they no longer prepare or distribute the water that was sold as premium alkalized drinking water in distinctive boxy blue bottles touting “E2 Electron Energized Technology.” Labels said it was “infused with negative ions” and offers healthy detoxifying properties.

    That agreement also required the company to turn over to the Food and Drug Administration records about processing, bottling and distribution; and to submit to unannounced inspections of company facilities in Las Vegas, suburban Henderson and Mesa, Arizona.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •