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  1. #196
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    ttt 4 2019!

    New Bottled Brews Delayed By Government Shutdown
    January 10, 2019 7:56 PM ET
    HOPE KIRWAN

    FROM
    Wisconsin Public Radio


    Craft beer lovers may not see many new brews on the shelves in coming weeks. The government shutdown means new labels can't be approved, delaying the release of new bottled beers.
    Dave Martin/AP

    Craft beer drinkers in the U.S. may see fewer new bottled beers coming out in the next few months.

    That's because the federal agency that approves brewery labels is closed, a result of the government shutdown.

    The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. One of the TTB's jobs is to review beverage alcohol labels for things like alcohol content or fluid ounces in a bottle.

    As of Dec. 21, the TTB had received 192,279 label applications since the start of 2018. That breaks down to over 3,000 applications coming in every week.

    But since the government shut down, labels aren't getting approved right now. That's a problem for beermakers like Joe Katchever, owner and brewmaster of Pearl Street Brewery in La Crosse, Wis.

    Pearl Street is celebrating its 20th anniversary in February, and Katchever's team brewed something special for the big anniversary party. Called Deux Decadence (a nod to two decades), the stout has been aging in bourbon barrels from Kentucky for a year.

    But Katchever can't bottle the more than 500 cases of beer until his label gets approved by the bureau.


    Pearl Street Brewery in La Crosse, Wis., is celebrating its 20th anniversary in February, and brewmaster Joe Katchever's team brewed up a new beer called Deux Decadence. The stout has been aging in bourbon barrels from Kentucky for a year but may not be released in bottles because of the government shutdown.
    Hope Kirwan/Wisconsin Public Radio

    "We can still roll out the beer in draft form," Katchever said. "We're all hoping they figure out what they need to figure out and open the government back up."

    Paul Gatza, director of the Brewers Association, estimates half of the craft breweries in the U.S. are in a similar position. "Any products that need those government approvals are just kind of frozen on hold," Gatza said. "I think about all the spring releases that are going to be coming out soon. Well, a lot of them won't be coming out."

    Gatza said the TTB can generally approve a beer label within five to seven days. But after nearly three weeks of being shut down, the bureau is likely to have a huge backlog of applications waiting when the government reopens.

    "Brewers know that they're going to start at the beginning of the stack and get through them," Gatza said. "So for beers that brewers want to release in February or March, a lot of them are trying to rush their paperwork in now, just so they don't get stuck having to wait months."

    Industry leaders say this backlog of applications is also a concern for large beermakers in the U.S.

    Craig Purser, president of the National Beer Wholesalers Association, said large alcohol companies and their distributors rely on the same services from TTB that craft producers use. "[It] doesn't matter what the size of the company is; when nobody's answering the phone, the work stops and it really puts the beer industry at a disadvantage," Purser said.

    Purser said breweries big and small worry that disadvantage could start to affect their bottom line if the government shutdown continues to keep them from bottling and selling their beers.
    Well that's annoying...
    Gene Ching
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  2. #197
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    Funky Buddha Brewery

    There are probably enough Buddhist Beers now to make a separate thread from our Zen/Buddhist brand names one.

    I want some Funky Jesus Beer.

    Funky Buddha Brewery


    Funky Buddha Brewery was founded in 2010 in Boca Raton, Florida, and is committed to producing bold craft beers that marry culinary-inspired ingredients with time-honored technique. Our mantra is big, bold flavors, made exactingly with natural ingredients. So, for example, if we say a beer will taste like peanut butter and jelly, you can be sure you’ll smell and taste the fresh roasted peanuts and fruity berry jam. Our flagship beers such as Hop Gun IPA and Floridian Hefeweizen, also strive towards big, bold flavor. It’s who we are.

    Our Brewery is located in the heart of Oakland Park’s new Culinary Arts District. The 110,000 sq-ft facility is powered by a 30-barrel, three-piece brewhouse, which feeds nearly 45,000 BBLs of capacity, making us South Florida’s largest craft microbrewery. Each of our distinctive beers is brewed using the finest, all-natural ingredients. We offer tours of our facility, scratch-made grub, and dozens of delicious beers on tap daily.

    You can sample our creations in our spacious tap room - open 7 days a week, 11:30am to midnight - as well as in bars and restaurants all across South Florida. Or just pick up a six pack of Hop Gun or Floridian or one of our seasonal offerings at major retailers throughout Florida. And of course, we still brew at our original location in Boca Raton, the Funky Buddha Brewery & Lounge, which has become a test kitchen for our more experimental brews.

    See you soon for a pint! Cheers!

    Gene Ching
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  3. #198
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    resurrected

    I luv Belgian ales

    Belgium
    Belgian monks resurrect 220-year-old beer after finding recipe

    Grimbergen Abbey brew incorporates methods found in 12th-century books
    Daniel Boffey in Grimbergen
    Tue 21 May 2019 10.08 EDT Last modified on Tue 21 May 2019 12.50 EDT


    Father Karel Stautemas: ‘We had the books with the old recipes, but nobody could read them.’ Photograph: Yves Herman/Reuters

    It has taken more than 220 years but an order of monks at Grimbergen Abbey, producers of a fabled medieval beer whose brand was adopted by mass producers in the 1950s, have started to brew again after rediscovering the original ingredients and methods in their archives.

    In a sign of the significance of the news for beer-loving Belgians, the announcement was made by the abbey’s subprior, Father Karel Stautemas, in the presence of the town’s mayor and 120 journalists and enthusiasts.

    Uncasking the first glass, Stautemas said the development was the culmination of four years of research into the methods of monks that brewed beer in the Norbertine monastery before it was burned down by French revolutionaries in 1798. The monastery was later reinstated but the brewery and its recipes were thought to be lost.


    Norbertine Father Karel toasts with a Grimbergen beer. Photograph: Grimbergen

    Stautemas admitted it might be best not to drink too much of the newly produced beer, which is 10.8% alcohol by volume. “One or two is OK,” said Chris Selleslagh, the mayor of Grimbergen, a town six miles north of Brussels.

    The source of inspiration for the new microbrewery, located on the same spot as the original, was the discovery from 12th-century books of details about the original monks’ brewing methods, specifically their use of hops rather than fermented herbs, which put the monks ahead of many of their contemporaries.

    The books were saved in the 18th century when the fathers knocked a hole in the library wall and secretly removed them before the abbey was set on fire.

    “We had the books with the old recipes, but nobody could read them,” Stautemas said. “It was all in old Latin and old Dutch. So we brought in volunteers. We’ve spent hours leafing through the books and have discovered ingredient lists for beers brewed in previous centuries, the hops used, the types of barrels and bottles, and even a list of the actual beers produced centuries ago.”

    Only some elements from the recipe books are being used by the monks. “I don’t think people now would like the taste of the beer made back then,” Stautemas said.

    Marc-Antoine Sochon, the newly appointed master brewer for the abbey, said: “In those times, regular beer was a bit tasteless, it was like liquid bread.”

    The lack of artificial additives, use of wooden barrels and exploitation of particular local soil – or terroir – is being emulated.

    Stautemas, who lives with 11 other monks at the abbey, said: “What we really learned was that the monks then kept on innovating. They changed their recipe every 10 years.”

    The new beer is being made in partnership with Carlsberg, which produces the Grimbergen range of beers for sale around the world, and Alken-Maes, which sells it on the Belgian market.

    The microbrewery will produce 3m 330ml glasses a year for a largely French and Belgian market.

    Asked whether he felt comfortable with the commercial tie-up with big brewers, Stautemas said the royalties from all the Grimbergen beers would allow the monks to live in the monastery, make pilgrimages and help “those who come knocking on our door and need help”.

    Grimbergen was founded in 1128 but burned down three times in all, giving it its symbol of a phoenix and the motto ardet nec consumitur – burned but not destroyed.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #199
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    I missed this post

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    There are probably enough Buddhist Beers now to make a separate thread from our Zen/Buddhist brand names one.

    I want some Funky Jesus Beer.

    Funky Buddha Brewery
    These guys are fairly local for me, still a 30 minute drive though.

    I like them a lot. Their Mango IPA is really good.

    Of late, they have really been doing a lot of mixed up stuff...lot's of different flavors. Last time I went in I couldn't get a basic beer other than their year round selection...which are ok, but nothing special. I do have to say that I finally tried their acclaimed 'Maple Bacon Coffee Porter' and was very disappointed in a beer that cost $17/22oz.

    No one seems to be making a lot of 'old ales' or 'barleywines' that much anymore.

    I do recommend them as a stop if anyone is in the area. Their food offerings are also generally very good to excellent for pub fare. We get the zuchinni fries every time and an olive plate that is amazing.
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

  5. #200
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    Yuengling hotel

    I know Yuengling is actually a poorly spelled German term, but it always reads as Chinese for me.

    Tampa's Yuengling-themed hotel will begin construction in 2020
    Tampa City Council approved the project.
    JENNA RIMENSNYDER OCT 25, 2019 12 PM0 Tweet Share


    YUENLING/ FACEBOOK

    Earlier this year, there were talks of a Yuengling-themed hotel popping up in Tampa at 11111 N. 30th St. near Busch Gardens. Well, Yuengling Beer Company had a rezoning hearing last month to get the green light to build a hotel next door to the main brewery. According to the Tampa Bay Business Journal, Tampa City Council unanimously approved Yuengling's plans for a mixed-use redevelopment on its 43-acre property.

    Carlos Alfonso, a Tampa architect involved in the project, told TBBJ that construction is slated to kick off in May 2020.

    The plans includes all things a hotel would typically host: 200 hotel rooms, a restaurant, and a 5,900-square-foot conference room. Oh, and a microbrewery, a beer garden, tasting room, and a Yuengling museum. If going on a tour of the main brewery isn't enough, you can booze and snooze in Tampa's new hotel. Prepare to plan your next staycation at the Yuengling-themed hotel — although you may checkout with a beer gut.

    More details to come as construction begins and vacancy becomes available.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oso View Post
    I like them a lot. Their Mango IPA is really good.

    I do have to say that I finally tried their acclaimed 'Maple Bacon Coffee Porter' and was very disappointed in a beer that cost $17/22oz.

    No one seems to be making a lot of 'old ales' or 'barleywines' that much anymore.
    Thanks for the review. I don't drink beer much anymore (carb issues) but when I did, I didn't really care for IPAs or flavored fruity beers (not sure how I'd react to bacony beers). I did like the old ales and barleywines tho.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #201
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    COVID-19, rats & bud

    About that global economy...

    Budweiser APAC takes a hit in China as biggest Lunar New Year campaign runs into coronavirus outbreak
    Sales to nightclubs and restaurants has come to a halt amid the public health crisis sparked by coronavirus outbreak
    Net profit fell 2 per cent in 2019, partially due to weaker sales to nightclubs and restaurants last quarter
    Yujing Liu
    Published: 12:04pm, 27 Feb, 2020


    Packs of Budweiser beers are displayed in a Shanghai's supermarket. The brewer says on February 27 that there’s “almost no activity in the nightlife channel and very limited activity in restaurants.” Photo: AFP

    Budweiser Brewing Company APAC, the most profitable brewer in Asia, said revenue in China plunged in the first two months of this year as nightclubs and restaurants were shut across the country amid the coronavirus outbreak.
    The Asia-Pacific unit business of Anheuser-Busch InBev estimated its China sales to have declined by US$285 million in January and February compared to the same period last year, it said in notes to its 2019 financial results on Thursday. The hit is equivalent to about 4 per cent of its revenue last year, based on its latest accounts.
    Profit also declined by US$170 million over the period, the company said in the report, referring to its normalised earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation or Ebitda. That is about 8 per cent of its full-year figure in 2019. The company’s top beer brands in China include Budweiser, Corona, Hoegaarden and Harbin.
    “The impact of the virus outbreak on our business continues to evolve,” Budweiser said in the financial report. “We have observed almost no activity in the nightlife channel and very limited activity in restaurants.”
    Other retail channels also recorded a meaningful decline, it said, but e-commerce sales growth accelerated significantly.
    The viral outbreak has so far infected more than 82,000 people and killed at least 2,800, mostly in mainland China. The hit put a halt to a strong start in the opening three weeks of 2020 just as Budweiser was launching its largest ever Lunar New Year campaign, prompting the brewer to also shut some of its breweries including in the epicentre of Wuhan.
    Budweiser said it has reopened over half of its beer factories in China and obtained permission to reopen the rest, except for one in Wuhan, after the country extended the Lunar New Year holiday by a week to contain the virus.
    The firm also expressed concerns over its business in South Korea, where the novel virus is spreading rapidly, adding to pressure from price competition last year. South Korea recorded a surge in infection and death this week, stoking concerns about a wider contagion.
    Budweiser said net profit fell 2 per cent to US$994 million last year, while revenue was little changed at about US$6.55 billion. Still, total volume sold last year declined by 3 per cent from the previous year, mainly “due to a challenging industry and competitive environment in South Korea and softness in the China nightlife channel,” it said.
    Hong Kong-listed shares of Budweiser fell by 3.1 per cent to HK$23.55 as of 10:40am local time, bringing the loss to 13 per cent from its IPO price of HK$27. Budweiser raised US$5 billion in its listing plan, one of the five biggest IPOs in the world’s last year.




    Yujing Liu
    Yujing Liu is a business reporter with a passion for understanding and explaining the fascinating complexities of China’s economy and society. Originally from Beijing, she joined the Post in 2017 after graduating from the University of Hong Kong with a degree in politics and journalism.
    THREADS
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    Gene Ching
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  7. #202
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    Mustard

    Suddenly, I'm pleased that I had to give up beer...

    French’s Yellow Mustard Now Comes in Beer Form
    The new “tropical wheat ale” from Oskar Blues was brewed with 150 pounds of actual mustard.
    By Mike Pomranz July 29, 2020

    Beer collaborations come in many varieties—from the obvious (of course, Dunkin’ wants to make a coffee beer) to the more forced (was anyone clamoring for brews from L.L.Bean?) But the most interesting collabs not only grab your attention, but also leave you thinking, That sounds so weird, I need to try it! Here’s a beer that checks those boxes: Colorado’s Oskar Blues has co-conspired on a beer with none other than French’s Mustard.

    Launching on August 1, aka National Mustard Day, French’s Mustard Beer is billed as a “tropical wheat beer” brewed with Key lime, lemon, tangerine, passionfruit, and 150 pounds of French’s Classic Yellow Mustard.


    FRENCH'S

    “We elevated the Classic Yellow Mustard flavor with tangy lemon and lime to create a tropical wheat ale I’d pair with a loaded hot dog on the hottest day of the year,” Oskar Blues Head Brewer Juice Drapeau explained.

    We got our hands on one of the eye-popping yellow cans featuring French’s signature red flag and were surprised by its relative subtlety. The beer is bright and refreshing, with just a touch of vinegary mustard flavor cutting through the tart tropical acidity. It’s nowhere near mustardy enough to pour on a bun, but pair it with a hot dog? Yes, a thousand times yes.

    The limited release brew will be available to order online from CraftShack starting this Saturday or at Oskar Blues Brewery taprooms in Boulder and Longmont, Colorado, and Brevard, North Carolina, while supplies last. But if you miss out, Oskar Blues has also released a homebrew recipe to make French’s Mustard Beer—a great opportunity to really ratchet up the mustard levels to new extremes. Or maybe experiment with Dijon?

    Mustard obsessives may notice that this year’s French’s beer is actually a conceptual follow up to last year’s French’s Mustard Ice Cream, produced in collaboration with Coolhaus for National Mustard Day 2019. That bizarre mustard creation proved a bit controversial around our office, but in mustard beer’s defense, at least it has alcohol… 5.2 percent by volume to be exact. Not that anyone is counting while drinking a mustard beer.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #203
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    All is lost now...

    2020, amirite?

    Guinness brings out a non-alcoholic version of the black stuff
    Diageo rolls out Guinness 0.0 to whet the appetite of younger, health-conscious drinkers
    Thu, Oct 22, 2020, 15:07
    Charlie Taylor

    Guinness 0.0 is being rolled out next week. Photograph: Aerial Photography Ireland via Andres Poveda

    It is the black stuff but not as we know it. Diageo is rolling out a non-alcoholic version of Guinness, which it says is every bit as good as the product customers have enjoyed in the past.

    Guinness 0.0 is being launched after a four-year development process led by the engineering and innovations teams at St James’s Gate in Dublin. Its makers claim it looks and tastes the same as a regular pint, with alcohol the only thing that is missing.

    The no-alcohol version is brewed using the same ingredients but with a cold filtration process used to filter out the booze.

    The claim that “Guinness is good for you” may have been widely discredited, but its makers are no doubt hoping that they can at least claim it isn’t too bad for you. The company points out that the no-alcohol version contains just 16 calories per 100ml, meaning a standard can contains 70 calories in total.

    Without compromising

    “We know people want to be able to enjoy a Guinness when they choose not to drink alcohol without compromising on taste, and with Guinness 0.0 we believe they will be able to do exactly that,” said Gráinne Wafer, global brand director.

    Guinness 0.0 will be available from next week in supermarkets, with plans afoot to also make it available in bars in early 2021.

    This is by no means the first time that Guinness has sought to reduce the amount of alcohol in its products.

    Guinness introduced its first non-alcoholic craft lager called Pure Brew in Ireland in 2018. A year earlier it rolled out Guinness Zero in Indonesia. It was also behind Kaliber, a lager which launched in 1986.

    Guinness Light, which while not totally alcohol-free, was a lighter stout introduced by the company in the 1970s which proved a massive failure. With alcohol consumption having declined in recent years, however, particularly among young people, Guinness will be hoping that its new product doesn’t meet the same fate.
    Gene Ching
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