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Thread: Bodybuilding makes you slow and...

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  1. #1
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    Bodybuilding makes you slow and...

    Remember that silliness that some still believe that BB makes you slow and stiff?
    Well...

    Here is former pro BB Flex Wheeler:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vL2TnTVKDu8&feature=fvsr

    Kevin Levrone sprinting
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1-yg...eature=related
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  2. #2
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    It CAN make you slow, especially if you gain a lot of weight and don't do any conditioning.

    If you do conditioning WHILE you get bigger, you won't get slower. You'll most likely get a lot faster/more agile.
    It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand. - Apache Proverb

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesC View Post
    It CAN make you slow, especially if you gain a lot of weight and don't do any conditioning.

    If you do conditioning WHILE you get bigger, you won't get slower. You'll most likely get a lot faster/more agile.
    Sure, anything makes you slow if you gain weight and do nothing, that is a given.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  4. #4
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    Doesn't matter how big someone is, give them enough steroids and HGH and they'll turn into a goddamn cheetah.

    I'm definitely not trying to defend the old limp wrist 90lb weakling justification for lack of strength but all other things being equal, lighter and smaller is always going to be faster.

  5. #5
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    And I can't tell from the video to what extent he has built his lower body muscles. Having a well developed upper body won't prevent you from kicking high.

    That being said, I agree with the sentiment that body building doesn't necessarily preclude flexibility. However, I believe there are ways to improve functional strength that are more efficient than bodybuilding. Typically, using much lower weight, higher rep can build more functional (for the purposes of MA) strength.
    Sith Legal Kung Fu is unstoppable.

  6. #6
    Greetings,

    Flex Wheeler: His arms are so heavy he can't hold them up to fight.

    Kevin Levrone: I am really sad for this guy. In that link he looked so roided up. Currently, he has depressed testosterone levels as a result of taking steroids. When he first showed up on the scene he really looked good and natural.

    I prefer the term "Strength Training" to "Bodybuilding". Bodybuilding brings to mind steroids, untested pharmaceuticals. Even the so called "natural bodybuilders" are selling out to pharmaceuticals. Last year, I picked up a magazine on natural bodybuilding and the editor said something so incredibly profound that it stuck with me long after I immediately threw it out. He wrote in very large letters that the best nutrition comes from a combination of: protein and free form amino acids.

    Back on topic: When ABC's Wide World of Sports had its annual Superstars competition, the strong guys did pretty well all around.


    mickey

  7. #7
    a distinction should be made between strength training(general) & bodybuilding(specific). bodybuilding seem primarily concern with muscle hypertrophy rather than optimal strength and functionality. here's an excerpt from an article by Tom Venuto that i found interesting:

    With low reps, the hypertrophy (size increase) of the muscle fibers is usually minimal. In other words, reps under 6 make you stronger, but they don't necessarily make you bigger if the strength gains come from adaptations in the nervous system - the muscle fibers and other muscle cell structures do not hypertrophy (enlarge). This explains why certain athletes, powerlifters and Olympic lifters can be wicked strong but they sometimes don't look as strong as they are.

    When you train with medium reps (6-12) the adaptations are more metabolic and cellular and only moderately neurological. This is why 8-12 reps is the range most often recommended for bodybuilding and hypertrophy. You get bigger AND stronger in this rep range, but your strength gains are not maximal. This explains why some bodybuilders look stronger than they are (and why they are often the brunt of jokes made by powerlifters and weight lifters; i.e. "big, weak, slow, useless muscles", ha ha ha).

    When you train with higher reps (13-20+), the adaptations are mostly metabolic, cellular and vascular. This rep range produces local muscular endurance, a small degree of hypertrophy in certain cellular components such as the mitochondria and the capillaries, and very little strength.

    There is not a distinct line where neural adaptations end and structural/metabolic adaptations begin; rather it is a continuum, like temperature or colors of a rainbow

  8. #8
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