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Thread: Fast and Furious 6

  1. #1
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    Fast and Furious 6

    This would be a good role for Gina, as long as they give her a decent fight scene or two. Maybe they'll let her use her own voice this time.
    'Haywire' Star Gina Carano in Talks to Join 'Fast & Furious 6' (Exclusive)
    The star of Steven Soderbergh's "Haywire" is in talks to join Dwayne Johnson's team in the sixth installment of the Universal mega-franchise.
    1:12 PM PDT 4/23/2012 by Borys Kit

    Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images for the Women’s Sports Foundation

    Haywire star Gina Carano, the MMA athlete-turned-actress, is in negotiations to join the cast of Fast & Furious 6, the next installment in the billion-dollar franchise for Universal Pictures.

    Plot and character are being kept locked in the trunk of a 1970 Dodge Charger, but Paul Walker and Vin Diesel are set to return as rogue heroes Brian O’Conner and Dominic Toretto, respectively, while Dwayne Johnson is reprising his role as Diplomatic Security Service Agent Luke Hobbs, out to capture the boys.

    Carano will play a member of Johnson’s team.

    For Fast 6, Justin Lin is back as director for his fourth outing in the movie series, and Chris Morgan, who wrote the past three Fast films, is back on scripting duty. Neal H. Moritz and Diesel are returning as producers.

    Launched in 2001, the Fast franchise is one of Universal’s hottest properties, with 2011’s Fast Five reinvigorating what was considered a long-in-the-tooth series. Fast Five gave Universal its biggest opening weekend in studio history and grossed more than $600 million worldwide.

    Fast 6 is slated for release May 24, 2013.

    Carano gained favorable notices for her acting debut with Haywire, which director Steven Soderbergh built around her. Carano went toe-to-toe in the film against such heavyweights as Michael Fassbender, Channing Tatum, Ewan McGregor and Michael Douglas.

    On the strength of that movie, Carano nabbed the lead in In the Blood, an action thriller to be directed by John Stockwell. Carano will shoot that film after she finishes Fast 6.

    Carano is repped by Gersh, The Syndicate and Ziffren Brittenham.

    Email: Borys.Kit@thr.com
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  2. #2
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    That got a rise out of me

    Actually just watched F and F 5 this week and was pleasantly surprised. Vin Diesel didn't really seem to have his heart into it, but the cast was good and the dialogue was fun, the action great.
    "if its ok for shaolin wuseng to break his vow then its ok for me to sneak behind your house at 3 in the morning and bang your dog if buddha is in your heart then its ok"-Bawang

    "I get what you have said in the past, but we are not intuitive fighters. As instinctive fighters, we can chuck spears and claw and bite. We are not instinctively god at punching or kicking."-Drake

    "Princess? LMAO hammer you are such a pr^t"-Frost

  3. #3
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    Gina Carano vs. Michelle Rodriguez

    Gene Ching
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  4. #4
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    Moviegoers Aren't Just White Men

    CinemaCon: 'Fast & Furious 6' Recognizes - Shock of Shocks - Moviegoers Aren't Just White Men
    The "Fast & Furious" franchise has had great success casting demographically diverse actors -- why hasn't Hollywood noticed?
    Published: April 16, 2013 @ 4:29 pm
    By Brent Lang

    "Fast & Furious 6" reflects the changing demographics of today's moviegoers with its cast of Latino, African-American and Asian actors, Universal Studios Chairman Adam Fogelson said at CinemaCon on Tuesday.

    When Tyrese Gibson, Vin Diesel, Sung Kang and Michelle Rodriguez took the stage at the Colosseum at Caesar's Palace it was indeed a welcome break from the spectacle of white men anchoring big studio tentpole films.

    This kind of diversity has powered the illegal street racing franchise to more than $1.5 billion at the worldwide box office. Moreover, the franchise has grown its audience with each installment: "Fast Five" was actually the series' highest-grossing film, racking up $626.1 million worldwide. That could be eclipsed by "Fast & Furious 6," which BoxOffice.com senior analyst Phil Contrino predicts will gross between $700 million to $750 million at the global box office this summer.

    "They've called our series the most progressive force in Hollywood," Diesel told the crowd at CinemaCon.

    Diesel was referring to the franchise's use of social-media, which he credited with reviving Rodriguez's character, who set out the previous installment, but was brought back at the request of fans. He might as well have been talking about its habit of casting lead actors that mirror the increasingly global nature of film audiences.

    The kind of demographic variety makes sound business sense. Although Caucasians make up the majority of the population and moviegoers, Latinos are more likely than any other ethnic group to go to movies, according to a recent report by the Motion Picture Assn. of America. The number of Latinos who qualify as frequent moviegoers jumped from 8.4 million in 2011 to 10.9 million last year.

    Rodriguez said people have also responded to her ass-kicking character so strongly because she is the rare female character on big screens who doesn't shy away from a fight. Women make up 52 percent of moviegoers, but most franchise films are made by men, starring men and geared toward men.

    The bulk of the movies hitting theaters this summer will be anchored by white men -- the major exceptions being Will Smith's "After Earth" and the Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy female buddy cop movie "The Heat."

    Given the success of "Fast & Furious," why hasn't the rest of the industry taken notice?
    I don't care what Rodriguez says. My money is still on Gina.
    Gene Ching
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    The world is Lin's oyster

    Justin Lin: ‘Furious’ Filmmaker Finds Even Better Luck Tomorrow
    May 1, 2013 | 07:45AM PT
    Even with ‘Fast & Furious 6’ in his rearview, the helmer isn't slowing down
    Scott Foundas
    Chief Film Critic @foundasonfilm

    Imagine that you are 42 years old, your last three films earned over $1.1 billion at the worldwide box office, you have transformed a sagging franchise into a robust film series, and you are a native Mandarin speaker at a time when Hollywood is hungry to plant a flag in the Chinese market.

    In short, it’s a great moment to be Justin Lin.

    Yet the unassuming man who sits on a sofa in his editing suite on the Universal Studios lot on a recent afternoon might easily be mistaken for the UCLA grad student he once was rather than one of the movie industry’s prime directors. Fresh-faced and attired in a Nike golf shirt, he politely excuses the acrid aroma of fermented soybeans emanating from the take-out container on his lap.

    When he first embarked on the “Fast & Furious” franchise, there were days when Lin had trouble getting past the security guards at the studio’s front gates—something, he says only half jokingly, that still happens from time to time.

    “I don’t look like a director,” he says, by which he means partly his age but mostly his ethnicity.

    It is just over a month before the release of “Fast & Furious 6,” the fourth Lin-directed entry in Universal’s popular street-racing series, and two weeks before Lin must turn over his final cut to the studio. Just two days earlier, he was still on set, shooting a few last-minute inserts with one of his stars, Dwayne Johnson. Now Lin is scrutinizing visual effects shots, some of which fail to meet his standards for realism. “You get to play with physics on these movies,” Lin says, noting that all of the series’ engine-revving action is executed live on the set, by a crack team of second unit directors, picture car coordinators and stuntmen. CGI is used only to enhance what’s already there.

    One of the principal audience pleasures of any Fast movie comes from seeing heavy machinery perform gravity-defying feats of the sort usually reserved for Ringling Bros. and the New York City Ballet. In the case of “Fast 6″’s piece de resistance—a complex chase along a winding cliffside highway involving a small fleet of vehicles, a helicopter and a tank—that meant spending one full month of the film’s grueling 150-day schedule shooting in the Canary Islands, fine-tuning every screeching halt, spinning reverse and mid-air jump. On a large monitor, one of Lin’s editors plays the latest version of the sequence, in which bodies hang from and leap between vehicles with astonishing grace, while the tank smashes through full-sized cars as if they were straw.

    “We didn’t need a tank sequence,” remarks Lin, “but there were three character moments I had to have at that point, which had to do with the idea of trust, and once I realized what those were I started designing the action to go around that.” Sometimes, Lin says, it’s easier to reveal the true nature of a character through action rather than dialogue.

    Indie guru John Pierson, who has had Lin as a guest speaker in his University of Texas film class, says of the director, “I think because he comes from an indie/film-school background, he’s managed to keep these films rooted in the physical world, which makes a big difference. On top of that, he brings a genuine enthusiasm for the material and…for adding to the characters.”

    Lin was still enrolled at UCLA when the first “Fast and the Furious,” directed by Rob Cohen, hit theaters in 2001. He remembers excitedly going to see it, having recently learned about the subculture of illegal street racing from a documentary made by some fellow students. He was particularly intrigued by the preponderance of Asian-American drivers, who would race their heavily modified imports against American-made muscle cars in a show of ethnic pride. But he was disappointed that in the debut picture “the only Asian-Americans are the bad guys.”

    He was similarly unimpressed four years later when Universal’s then chairwoman Stacy Snider approached him about directing the third “Fast” movie, subtitled “Tokyo Drift.” At the time, Lin was still hot from his 2002 breakout Sundance hit “Better Luck Tomorrow” and had just wrapped his first studio movie, the Disney military drama “Annapolis.” Meanwhile, the “Fast” series seemed to be running on fumes. A 2003 sequel, “2 Fast 2 Furious,” had cost double the original film’s $38 million budget, but only slightly surpassed the former’s $207 million global gross. Star Vin Diesel and Cohen had both jumped ship after the first movie. And now Snider, producer Neal Moritz and screenwriter Chris Morgan were proposing a stand-alone installment minus the original characters, set in Tokyo and focused on the titular “drift” racing, in which competitors steer and brake their way around hairpin turns in an elegant gliding motion.

    But the first script Lin read was “all cars drifting around Buddha statues and geisha girls,” so he passed. Which only made the studio want him more.

    Finally, Lin took the assignment, but under the condition he be allowed to make certain changes. One involved wooing Diesel back for a film-ending cameo that would link “Tokyo Drift” back to the preceding films and open the door for more sequels. Lin recalls an eight-hour meeting with the actor, in which he used Diesel’s affection for the role-playing game “Dungeons & Dragons” to explain how he wanted to deepen the “Fast” series’ characters and make them more mythic, seeding some of the ideas that would come to fruition over the three subsequent movies.

    There were other battles to be fought, such as Lin’s insistence that “Tokyo Drift” co-star Sonny Chiba, one of the legends of 1970s martial arts cinema, be allowed to deliver his lines in subtitled Japanese. Despite its lower budget, “Tokyo Drift” only grossed $158.5 million worldwide.

    For 2009’s “Fast & Furious,” Lin had the full original cast back on board, plus a number of new additions (including Johnson, Korean-American Sung Kang and Israeli actress Gal Gadot) that have transformed the franchise into one that is easily Hollywood’s most racially and ethnically diverse. In turn, foreign box office has been soaring. “Fast & Furious” collected $363 million in global ticket sales and two years later, “Fast Five” sped its way to $626 million. Expectations for “Fast 6″ are even higher. And, Asians are no longer the bad guy.

    Lin credits Universal for allowing him to take bigger and bolder risks with each successive film. “Usually when you’re successful, the tendency is to be very conservative and say, ‘Well, it worked here. Just do the same thing again.’ But this is a franchise where they’re like, ‘You want to do what? OK. Go.’” That made it hard to turn down the offer to direct the planned seventh “Fast” film. But Lin has arrived at a place in his career where he feels ready to begin a new chapter.

    The “Fast” movies have paid off Lin’s mortgage for a while, and allowed him to give his parents — Taiwanese immigrants who spent 25 years running a mom-and-pop seafood joint in Anaheim — an early retirement. “So now I can make choices that I wouldn’t have been able to make in the last 10 years,” he says. He also oversees a small media empire: a culture blog (You Offend Me You Offend My Family); an original-content YouTube channel; and two production shingles — one (Barnstorm Pictures) a first-look deal with Universal, the other (Perfect Storm Entertainment) a joint venture with Chinese entrepreneur Bruno Wu’s Seven Stars Film Studios. Between the two production companies, Lin has an array of projects in various stages of development, ranging from a remake of the classic 1970s Samurai series “Lone Wolf and Cub” to more indie fare like a planned adaptation of David Henry Hwang’s Broadway play “Chinglish.”

    Hwang says, “There’s a desire on the part of Hollywood—and all American industries really — to get a foothold in China and take advantage of this market, combined with an amazing degree of ignorance about what it actually would take to achieve that.” Hwang has also collaborated with Lin on a YouTube adaptation of his play Yellow Face, set to premiere this summer. He sees Lin as someone who may help to bridge the gap.

    “I get that the Chinese market is growing, but I don’t think you can pander to that,” Lin says. “It’s like when people say “Fast and the Furious” is just fast cars and hot chicks—if it really was that easy, every studio would be doing it and making a lot of money. I told Bruno, ‘Let’s build movies that will play around the world.’ And China is a big part of the world.”
    Lone Wolf and Cub? Oh hell yeah.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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    I'm attending a screening tonight...

    ...just because of Gina.

    Gina Carano Talks FAST & FURIOUS 6, Fight Choreography, How Things Have Changed Since HAYWIRE and Her Upcoming Release IN THE BLOOD
    by Dave Trumbore Posted: May 20th, 2013 at 8:09 am


    Co-starring alongside Dwayne Johnson in Justin Lin’s upcoming Fast & Furious 6 is the tough and talented Gina Carano (Haywire). Carano plays Agent Hobbs’ partner Riley, who both team up with Dom Toretto (Vin Diesel) and his crew in order to take down an elite group of militarily-trained specialists led by Owen Shaw (Luke Evans). Carano took the time to talk to us about her experience working on her first big action franchise movie, fight choreography, and learning from director Lin. She also talked about how her experience in Haywire has changed her life, her future goals in her movie career and her upcoming film, In the Blood.

    Also starring Paul Walker, Michelle Rodriguez, Tyrese Gibson, Chris “Ludacris” Bridges, Jordana Brewster, Sung Kang and Gal Gadot, Fast & Furious 6 opens May 24th. Hit the jump to read the full interview.


    Collider: Since the the Fast and Furious franchise is all about cars, I was curious what your first car was.

    Gina Carano: Oh, my first car was a Chevy truck and I couldn’t tell you what year it was, but … my papa – my grandfather – gave my mom a truck when she was in high school and then my older sister got the same truck, so by the time I got the truck … I mean, we’re talking pathetic little radio with an antenna and the windshield wipers didn’t work, but it was painted baby blue and it had my name on the side of it. My papa didn’t want to spoil us too much so he tried to keep it real. [laughs]

    Yeah, same thing with me. I had the hand-me-down car that was probably older than I was.

    Carano: Yeah and then my little sister gets the old, old-school Mercedes that was my mom’s college car and I’m like, “Oh, you guys just treat the middle child like that, huh?”

    After your experience with Haywire, how did that change your Hollywood exposure? Did you start getting more calls? What sort of calls were you getting?

    Carano: It’s a film that piqued people’s interest and I think people still, even after Haywire, were a little gun-shy, but they still wanted to talk about it. They definitely wanted to talk a lot about it. So, when I got the call for Fast and Furious 6, that was, “Okay, now I can go from doing something like Haywire with director Steven Soderbergh and take that experience and then go into a huge franchise.” Really, there’s nothing that can teach you more than experiencing all this.

    After that, I did In the Blood, and that was directed by John Stockwell. I went straight from London to Puerto Rico and only had a day and a half off from shooting Fast 6 to filming In the Blood, and it was just a four-month, intense, crazy shoot that I learned so much about myself acting-wise. I was so excited to be like, “Okay, I think I really want to get more into this, I really want to explore this, because if I can do what I have done so far in such a short amount of time, I want to see what else is inside me.” It’s challenging. Of course, I feel like I can always do better with action and I always want to push the envelope there as long as I can because I’m a physical person and I love expressing myself physically, but I’m also, on the very flipside, an extremely emotional person. I like watching the relationships and the chemistry and the relatability … seeing somebody do it just right, just like if I’d see a fight scene in a movie, it’s like, “Okay, that person’s moving correctly and throwing their punches correctly,” and so, I want to portray that in acting. I do love entertaining and I love characters; it’s one of the reasons why I’m going into this with a positive belief in myself and I like this more than fighting right now, because in fighting, you’re representing yourself. In acting, you get to explore such an artistic side with different characters to research and learn and explore different things inside yourself and I do that anyway, so I might as well be doing something that I already do, as in a second nature to me, on film.

    Fast and Furious 6 obviously has a lot of great action, but it has good character turns and relationship building. We’ve got to talk about your fight scenes in this movie because they’re brutal, they’re fantastic and they’re actually refreshing; it’s nice to see the ladies getting involved in the action in these films. You have two big fight scenes with Michelle Rodriguez; can you talk about how you approached the choreography and rehearsals?

    Carano: I think with such a massive film like this and knowing that they wanted the fight scene between two women to be great, they hired such a wonderful stunt coordinator and we were training, it seems like, forever. As soon as I got to London, it was fight rehearsal after right rehearsal. Michelle was great; she showed up to every one. It’s kind of interesting. You never know who’s going to be standing in front of you, how intimidated they’re going to be or how insecure they’re going to be with acting or with action. They don’t know me, either. All they know is my past of being a professional fighter, so what kind of ideas have they built up in their head about me, not being able to control my punches or getting frustrated, the cliché that people think about fighters. But me and Michelle had such a great energy and there were no egos involved and I think we really took care of each other and made it okay to have a couple bumps and bruises. You can’t take it too seriously because this is what we’re doing. Nobody was hurt; I really pride myself on that. I don’t think I’ve ever hurt anybody unless I intended to. [laughs]

    I had a blast doing this. The rehearsals were intense. We went over the fight scenes over and over and over, me and Michelle did, until we were absolutely sick of it. That made it, on the day, so much easier to perform, like a dance that we had done over and over and over and on the day it was just like, “Oh!” And you put your energy in there that you’ve been holding up until the day and it was just such a beautiful way to do business and to work. It’s just like studying for a test and making the test easy; it makes it a lot of fun, especially when people enjoy it.

    From script to screen, about how much changed? Was there a lot of improvisation on set or was it pretty much as scripted? Do you know if any of your scenes didn’t make the final cut?

    Carano: That was really interesting because when I did that Haywire experience, what was written in the script with the revisions and everything is what was shot. Fast and Furious 6 was constantly, constantly changing and just constantly a new thing every single day, so you really had to just expect that. I wish I could say from the first conversation I had to the last conversation I had what transpired, but I think Justin Lin is a great, great director because he can take something on such a massive scale and have that many huge characters on and off the screen and he can manage it with a smile on his face and keep the positivity up and really keep everybody working. Not only that, but he pushed the action up on a whole new level, which is the escapism that people love to see, and he’s so passionate and excited about it.

    I’m really looking forward to seeing what Justin Lin does next, because he takes such care. I heard they had to pretty much pry the movie out of his hands just to get it shown in London because he was just so meticulous and there’s just so much respect to someone who takes that time and energy.


    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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    continued from previous

    You get to do a bit of a tag team with Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. Can you talk about your experience shooting with him on the movie?

    Carano: Yeah, he’s just a really wonderful man. I’ve heard that about him, people say, “I just love working with Dwayne,” and it was exactly that. He’s such a pleasure to be around and, at the same time, for me, knowing where he’s been and gone and kind of having a similar – not exactly the same, but a relatability to that – I have so much respect for that. Then, his work ethic and his professionalism was just … I have never seen a man work so hard. He was up at 3AM working out, then going to set, being a lead/main character, doing so much output. I was like, “When do you have time for yourself?” He’s really like a Superman, like a super-being. I don’t know how he gets it all done. I was inspired, because if the man can do all of that and keep his head on his shoulders and stay professional, then it just raises the bar for everybody around him. And having that be my second movie and standing next to him, watching how he works, it was really cool. He surrounds himself with good people from his hair and make-up to his bodyguards, they’re some of my favorite people to this day, I just love being their friends. He surrounds himself with really good people and keeps really grounded and I can’t tell you how much that means in this business. I really respect how he’s created his own company in and of itself.

    So, I just wanted to clarify: you said The Rock has bodyguards, is that right?

    Carano: [laughs] Yeah, The Rock has bodyguards. Yeah, they’re soldiers, they’re ex-soldiers that you don’t really want to mess with. They’re sitting there watching us play soldiers, so if I had a question I’d go up to one of them and be like, “How would you do this?” You feel really safe when they’re around, they’re just good solid guys.

    Did you guys do a lot of working out together during your downtime?

    Carano: No, not really, not at all. I like to do what I do, so I found a nice gym in London and I found a Muay Thai guy so I could hit some pads. That’s kind of like yoga to me, it balances me out and keeps me normal. I think that because all of these guys have worked together so much, they all bring their own people and their families, so coming in as a new person … I think somebody asked me once, “Where’s your entrouage?” And I was like, “Nope. I don’t have one. I kinda roll solo.” Everybody had an entourage. But I can find a home because I’ve pretty much been living out of my suitcase for the last ten years, so I can find a home anywhere. I know I can find Muay Thai and martial arts anywhere so I can always find a nice gym to help get that going. I think that everybody has worked together so much but everybody has their own lives when they go home at the end of the day, whereas Haywire we stuck together as a group and that’s the lovely thing about doing a new movie and having a fresh movie, but at the same time it’s understandable that people have worked together, it’s like, “Okay, we’re here to get the job done.”

    Can you talk about your experience filming in London?

    Carano: I just absolutely fell in love with London. I had a nice apartment and I’d go out and sit on the balcony and look around. I come from a family of little fashionistas who absolutely, their dream was to come to London and they came and visited me and just really soaked it in. It’s something that, you have to remind yourself that it’s something not everybody gets to do. I’m so fortunate to have done it and be able to invite my sister and my cousins out and say, “Hey, come stay with me in London.” It’s something that they have always wanted to see and really something special to them because they’re so fascinated and London has such great opportunities. You get used to taking the Tube stations and taking away trips to shop. The people are great, everybody’s relaxed and there are such interesting creative artists here. It was really a good experience for me and I really love it here.

    You already mentioned In the Blood. You’re also attached to the Adi Shankar project, which I believe is the female version of The Expendables. Are you still involved with that and can you give us an update?

    Carano: With that one, it’s kind of a work in progress and I think that as soon as I read the script I’d be able to answer that more thoroughly. I think it’s important to find a director who has a good vision behind it and, like, from Sucker Punch – I absolutely love that movie. So I take that and I say, “Okay, it’s a bunch of females and it’s very fantasy driven,” but if you take a couple of women who are very realistic and could actually pull off some amazing fights, maybe put a darker twist to the story to it and make it very cool and believable, that would be something I’d of course be interested in. There’s something about … it’s lovely to work with guys, but it’s a whole other educational experience working with women. It is a blast because you learn so much because you’re on the same page and it’s like, “Well, you’re a woman and you’re saying this and you’re doing this and we’re in the same profession, so we’re learning a lot from each other!” I went through this working with guys and I absolutely love learning stuff like that and having that camaraderie with someone of the same sex. So, if a good visionary wants to jump on board with that and I see their vision correctly and I like it and I like the script, I would absolutely do it but I have to read the script first.

    Briefly, Steve interviewed you previously for Haywire and he brought up the topic of Wonder Woman. With all of the recent superhero movies that are coming out, have you done any auditions for any superhero roles recently?

    Carano: No, I haven’t done any auditions. There have been talks about some different characters. That’s a dream to put on a costume and be a whole other level of character, but I think that … we’re looking at a whole bunch of different things right now. There’s always the possibility that some day I will be a comic book character that I’ll play and I’m not sure who that’s going to be. It would be very fun and fascinating. We’ll just have to see where my career is going to go. There’s so much I want to do. I love emotions, I love drama, I love comedy and I also want to take action up to another level, I love comics. I’m just reading some scripts and putting myself out there and seeing what’s attractive to me. We’ll kind of figure out where this goes. It’s going to be interesting and keeps it very exciting, I’ll tell you! [Laughs]

    Are there any dream roles that you would want to play if the opportunity came up?

    Carano: You know, when I was a teenager, it was Pride and Prejudice. It was Elizabeth in Pride and Prejudice. I know that really sounds ridiculous. But that’s already been redone, Keira Knightley did that. That was when I was young. I really like the idea of creating something new that’s fresh and something that people don’t understand what they’re watching. I like to break down barriers and I think that Hollywood is doing the same thing over and over. I want to do something new and say, “Let’s evolve as artists!”

    fast-and-furious-6-posterWell, I’ll tell you what, there’s always Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. If they can get that off the ground you might have a part; you might get to do both things in one!

    Carano: [Laughs] Alright! That’s what I’m sayin!

    Do you have any other upcoming roles or projects you want to fill us in on?

    Carano: In the Blood will be coming out later this year. It’s being looked at by distributors and there’s a bunch of incoming calls on it. I really felt like I tapped into something good there. I feel like I have potential to do so much more, but I feel like I showed a different side of myself that anybody who has been following my career is going to be extremely intrigued by. I look forward to hearing reactions because I just saw a little teaser for it the other day. It’s nice to watch something and say, “Oh my gosh, I did that!” I’m so glad that somebody caught that on film. I’m excited for people to start learning about In the Blood, and I think that when people see that, they’ll start to see how serious I am about where I’m going right now. But people haven’t seen it yet; they’ve only seen trailers for Fast and Furious 6 and Haywire and I understand that, but I’m looking forward to people seeing In the Blood.
    'I kinda roll solo.'
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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    Gene on Gina

    The main reason to see this film is for Gina. As it turns out, that is reason enough.

    FAST AND FURIOUS 6: A Sexquel with Conviction
    Gene Ching
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    Gina, Gina, Gina...
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    The main reason to see this film is for Gina. As it turns out, that is reason enough.

    FAST AND FURIOUS 6: A Sexquel with Conviction
    Hopefully Gina gets better roles after this. IMO, she's setting the new bar for female action hero. She's tough and you know it. I found it almost impossible to watch Scarlett Johansson's fight scenes in the Avengers after watching Gina in Haywire. I'm personally tired of seeing non trained waif females kicking the heck out of people, whereas you know Gina can really do it. She's tough, strong, and trained to fight.

  11. #11
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    Did well in PRC

    Furious 6 speeds to top of China box office
    By Kevin Ma
    Tue, 30 July 2013, 01:00 AM (HKT)



    Furious 6 handily beat the competition this weekend in China, making RMB149.9 million (US$24.4 million) in its first three days of release.

    Justin LIN 林詣彬's action film opened on Friday with a first-day gross of RMB42.7 million (US$6.96 million). The biggest 2-D opening day this year remains local production Tiny Times 小時代, on RMB73.0 million (US$11.9 million). In 2011, Fast Five (2011) made RMB67 million (US$10.9 million) in its first four days of release for a total of RMB263 million (US$42.8 million) by the end of its theatrical run.

    Furious 6 accounted for over 40% of all screenings nationwide over the weekend, causing White House Down to lose its screen dominance after just four days on release. The Roland EMMERICH action film was second-placed this weekend with RMB42.9 million (US$1.36 million) over three days. It has made RMB116 million (US$18.9 million) after one week on release.

    China-South Korea co-production Mr. Go 미스터 고 passed the RMB100 million milestone (US$16.3 million) on Sunday, its 11th day on release. Horror film Bunshinsaba 2 笔仙Ⅱ suffered a significant drop in its second weekend, with just RMB7.81 million over three days. After 13 days on release, AN Byung-ki 안병기 | 安兵基's China-produced has made RMB72 million (US$11.7 million) on more than 2.3 million admissions.

    Pacific Rim opens in China at midnight tonight.
    Been wondering about that PRC PR release...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #12
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    Our Fast & Furious sweepstakes

    Those of you who pay attention to our sweepstakes noticed we launched a special Grand Prize package for F&F6 last Friday, the day prior to Paul Walker's tragic death. The F&F6 BRD combo pack has been slated for release for this holiday season and they provided us with a nice prize package.

    Given the unfortunate circumstances, the promotion has been put on hold until DEC 9, and given that we are already completely booked for sweepstakes promotions into March already, this promotion will only be available for 4 days.

    Here is a press release concerning this:
    UNIVERSAL ANNOUNCES THAT A PORTION OF PROCEEDS FROM THE BLU-RAY™, DVD AND DIGITAL RELEASES OF FAST & FURIOUS 6 WILL BE DONATED TO PAUL WALKER’S REACH OUT WORLDWIDE CHARITY ORGANIZATION

    Disaster-Relief Foundation Founded by Walker to Benefit from Sales

    Universal City, CA, December 3, 2013—Universal Pictures today announced that a percentage of proceeds from the upcoming home entertainment release of Fast & Furious 6 will be donated to Paul Walker’s non-profit Reach Out WorldWide, a network of professionals with first responder skill-sets who augment local expertise when natural disasters strike in order to accelerate relief efforts. Walker founded the organization after witnessing deficiencies in local activations following the January 2010 Haiti earthquake, and he remained passionately devoted to the charity.

    “With the passing of Paul, the world has lost a man who spent a great deal of his life in service to others. We share in the deep grief of his family, friends and the countless fans who love him,” said Donna Langley, Chairman, Universal Pictures. “We keep Paul’s memory alive and honor his legacy through continued support of Reach Out WorldWide, the non-profit he founded to give hope to those who must rebuild after they have experienced natural disasters.”

    Fast & Furious 6 will be available in North America on Blu-ray, DVD, Digital and On Demand on December 10, 2013.

    Paul Walker’s family has requested that in lieu of flowers or other gifts, donations be made to support Paul’s charity. To learn more about the efforts of Reach Out WorldWide or make a direct donation, please visit www.roww.org.

    About Reach Out WorldWide
    Reach Out WorldWide (ROWW)—consisting of skilled volunteers—is a non-profit registered 501(c)(3) organization. While part of a relief team responding to the massive earthquakes that devastated Haiti on January 12, 2010, actor/producer Paul Walker saw a gap between the availability of skilled resources and the requirement for such personnel in post-disaster situations. Following the trip he contacted a group of his friends to assist him in forming ROWW with the purpose of filling this unmet need.

    ROWW is a network of committed professionals with first responder skill-set (including project management, logistics, heavy equipment operation, EMT, paramedic, firefighting and healthcare, etc.). The volunteers provide their expertise when disasters strike and augment local resources with the goal of accelerating relief efforts on a worldwide basis. ROWW has developed Standard Operating Procedures that facilitate arriving quickly, clearing access, providing basic necessities and medical assistance to ease the survivors’ pain and bringing hope in the bleakest of circumstances.

    ROWW operates on the philosophy that by making a difference in just one person’s life, the world has been changed for the better.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #13
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    Enter to win a FAST & FURIOUS 6 GRAND PRIZE

    Enter to win a FAST & FURIOUS 6 GRAND PRIZE (FAST & FURIOUS 6 Extended Version Blu-ray™ Combo Pack and Fast & Furious 6 Branded USB Charger and Key Chain) Sweepstakes! A PORTION OF PROCEEDS FROM THE BLU-RAY™, DVD AND DIGITAL RELEASES OF FAST & FURIOUS 6 WILL BE DONATED TO PAUL WALKER’S REACH OUT WORLDWIDE CHARITY ORGANIZATION. Contest ends 6:00 p.m. PST on 12/12/13. Good luck everyone!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #14
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    Black belt for Walker

    Paul Walker is Given an Honorary Black Belt by His Martial Arts Mentor



    Posted 3 hours ago • by Andrea Simpson • 0 comments
    In the days after Paul Walker’s tragic death, the outpouring of support has been endless. So overwhelming, in fact, that the Fast & Furious star’s family and friends have been moved by the incredibly touching messages of love.

    And these kind gestures of remembrance keep coming in honor of the fallen star.

    Ricardo “Franjinha” Miller, Walker’s Jiu-Jitsu instructor for nine years, wanted to honor his friend with something he worked so hard for and strived for… and in his death, Walker achieved his goal.

    In a posting on Miller's Paragon Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu website, Miller tells the story of his first impression of the modest movie star in 2004, their intimate conversation he’ll never forget, and how the actor's passion for martial arts led to the decision to give Walker a black belt in memoriam.

    “A mutual friend had sent Paul my way, but I did not recognize him when he first walked in the door," said Miller. "In part, it was because he did not carry himself like a movie star, or a Hollywood big shot. Without the burden of a heavy ego, he was easy going with a ready smile. Like the Spartan setting of the gym, he was simple and unpretentious.”

    Their bond, Miller added, went beyond the Jui-Jitsu studio in Santa Barbara, Calif.

    “We became fast friends. He brought me down to Ensenada for the filming of The Life and Death of Bobby Z. We travelled to L.A. to watch the UFC," he remembered. "More recently, Paul had me in Montreal to add a personal touch to the fight scenes in his movie, Brick Mansions," Miller said.

    Walker, he said, was determined to showcase his love of the sport as its ambassador on the the big screen.

    “He always wanted to showcase Jiu-Jitsu in his movies. Rather than the punches and kicks so common to many action films, he wanted to use his movies as a stage for Jiu-Jitsu," he added. "Some of the Jiu-Jitsu techniques from our training sessions were utilized in the Fast and Furious series. Paul would always tell me that he did not just want to be known for fast cars. He wanted to be known for fast cars and Jiu-Jitsu. He wanted to be an ambassador for Jiu-Jitsu.”

    They even choreographed a scene Wallker hoped would one day make it into one of his action films.

    “His dream fight sequence was to end with a bow and arrow choke. We even worked out a sick Hollywood-style set up for the choke. Unfortunately, it was not to be," he said.

    And despite his fame and fortune, Walker just wanted to be one of the students.

    “Paul became a regular sight at the academy, showing up with his dog in the bed of the truck,” added Miller. “When students would see Paul around town, he was always excited to talk Jiu-Jitsu and was never too busy for anyone in the Paragon family."

    So, in the same way Walker touched his life, Miller is returning the sentiment with a heartbreaking and touching tribute.

    “As I reflect back on his life, I remember one of our first conversations. Sitting in our gis on the mat, Paul was like many white belts; he wanted to know about becoming a black belt," said Miller. "I told him that at Paragon we don’t give away black belts. I said that I didn’t care who he was, I was not giving him a 'celebrity black belt.' He loved that! He said that he knew that he was starting late (he was 31), but he was determined to become a black belt. He said ‘I will get my black belt, even if I need to get it in my coffin.’

    “Now in the wake of his death," he added, "I would like to reward Paul Walker the black belt that he wanted so much during his life.”

    In the end, honoring Paul in this way was an easy choice to make.

    "Paul was both an actor and unique person/martial artist. He understood in a depth that few men have," Miller continued on Facebook. "He was tasked in the past few years to spread in the big screen the martial art that we all love. While he knew and understood the Bjj moves, Paul's kindness and actions in life on and off the mat showed that he had a far greater understanding of the martial art spirit as a whole. For that reason and conversations between us in later years, I believe that Paul was the true modern father of this particular martial art system and honors [sic] him as such.

    "Jiu Jitsu is not just tournament medals or showed moves in the proper way. Is not just 'bust your ass on the mat every single day.' It is about commitment to the art, to help others in need, keep always improving your soul until you die and the more important one avoid get stuck in the sins of life. Paul was a person that a lot of us should use as a model in our live [sic]."

    Miller even shared candid photos from his own personal album filled with many memories with Walker:

    "I know he will reach it one day," Miller posted of Walker's dream of a black belt. "So in his memory, I presented it to his Dad at his family memorial."

    In a tear-jerking Facebook message Miller posted Nov. 30, the day Walker died in a fiery car crash, he wrote of his longtime friend: "No words can describe my feeling right now, just RIP Bro. Your kindness and friendship will be missed. I just can't believed [sic] it. But, I want to thank you for the great times and memories that we shared together. I will Never forget It. Go in peace my friend."


    Miller helped train Walker for the fight scenes in his final film, Brick Mansions. He shared a behind-the-scenes look at the two in action on Facebook.


    (Photo: Facebook)
    Only a few hours left for our FAST & FURIOUS 6 GRAND PRIZE sweepstakes. The promotion is for the Blu-Ray combo pack, the sales of which will benefit Walker's Reach Out Worldwide Charity.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #15
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    Our winners are announced!

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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