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Thread: qigong only classes suggestions please

  1. #1

    qigong only classes suggestions please

    It is my desire to create a qigong only class that I could “teach” basics at least in a twelve week setting at my Community College. I currently teach Wuji Posture/ZZ and 8 Pieces of Brocade but want add a second qigong. In the past, I have instructed in Yi Jin Jing but in reading different internet sites it seems this is too “advanced” and requires too much commitment for short classes. I have also tried Five Animal Frolics.... fun but awkward to teach as it seems to be too dynamic.... Same thing for the Taiji Ruler (if you do all of the movements). So does anyone have any suggestions. If anyone has a “syllabus” of sorts for a qigong class I would sure appreciate it.

  2. #2
    dont get so hung up on "classical" arrangements: look at the qigong you already know - and by "know", I mean that, through your practice, u hav become deeply-acquainted with; then look at how what u kno works in terms of each individual movement and as a group; look at each movement in terms of it's own depth; and look then at how each move interracts with others in a set like 8 brocade or yi jin jing; understand these interrelationships, and u can then mix and match accordingly; this is how ur qigong becomes alive, not set in stone to die;

    when u hav discovered the aliveness, u can modify what u hav to suit ur needs and the needs of u students - b it teaching for recreation at a communicty college, or for health / healing in a medical setting;

    u can even create ur own qigong movements or sets - u don't need permission from anyone but urself - of course, if one does create something new, from where does this creation arise? how deep is the well from which one draws water? if u r already teaching, then presumably ur well is deep enough to quench the thirst of those without one - hopefully u won't run out of water for urself!

    teahing qigong is about teaching breath and body - and to b mindful while one teaches in order that ur students learn by direct observation of the depth of ur practice; do u embody the practice? if so, when u hav this, then the content of what u teach becomes less important than the context...

  3. #3

    Smile

    Thanks for leading me down a better path. I have always had a tendency to want to provide to much info too soon. I now realize that teaching the fundamentals of qigong and as it relates to each movement of one set rather than teaching a whole new set without digesting the one is a good way to lose out altogether. In other words "Quality not quantity". Thanks for helping me see between the trees a little more.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Hobart Tasmania - Australia
    Posts
    695
    I take weekly classes...

    If ever you doubt yourself think back to when you first started, how much you could take on board.

    Keep it simple and then slowly add the detail.

    Breath work, meditation, body posture - then movements of the set can be refined later.

    If you teach correct basics and foundation it wont matter what set you teach it will be on the money.

    Dont be so worried about pumping out sets.

  5. #5
    think back to when you first started, how much you could take on board.
    Thanks for input. I have a tendency to forget my own "beginners" abilities and need to remind myself of this more often.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by taai gihk yahn View Post
    dont get so hung up on "classical" arrangements: look at the qigong you already know - and by "know", I mean that, through your practice, u hav become deeply-acquainted with; then look at how what u kno works in terms of each individual movement and as a group; look at each movement in terms of it's own depth; and look then at how each move interracts with others in a set like 8 brocade or yi jin jing; understand these interrelationships, and u can then mix and match accordingly; this is how ur qigong becomes alive, not set in stone to die;

    when u hav discovered the aliveness, u can modify what u hav to suit ur needs and the needs of u students - b it teaching for recreation at a communicty college, or for health / healing in a medical setting;

    u can even create ur own qigong movements or sets - u don't need permission from anyone but urself - of course, if one does create something new, from where does this creation arise? how deep is the well from which one draws water? if u r already teaching, then presumably ur well is deep enough to quench the thirst of those without one - hopefully u won't run out of water for urself!

    teahing qigong is about teaching breath and body - and to b mindful while one teaches in order that ur students learn by direct observation of the depth of ur practice; do u embody the practice? if so, when u hav this, then the content of what u teach becomes less important than the context...
    Very interesting explanation, thanks.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fantasyland
    Posts
    6,067
    Don't forget to create a teaching plan with an organized progression from beginning to intermediate to advanced techniques/exercises.

    Also, prior to each class, write out your plan/goals for that particular class. You don't have to follow the plan necessarily, but if gives you an outline and an organized way to proceed.

    When I was teaching, Kung Fu not qi gong, I rarely followed my teaching plan other than to use it as a general guide. I freely changed the class according to my own inclination at the time and/or according to teachable moments created by student questions or what I perceived to be a weakness that required attending too, etc.
    FAITH: "Confidence, born of experience"

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