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Thread: 2020 Tokyo Olympics

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post

    That being said, I'd totally watch Olympic pole sports.
    Men division right?

  2. #62
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    It's all about the cheese

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Córdoba View Post
    What's next 'Chase the cheese down the hill'?
    Wait, there's a sport for that? I'm totally in. Now to round up a team of nacho ninjettes for this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Córdoba View Post
    Men division right?
    Honestly, I hadn't even considered that. Does pole sports even have a men's division?
    Gene Ching
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  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Wait, there's a sport for that? I'm totally in. Now to round up a team of nacho ninjettes for this.

    Honestly, I hadn't even considered that. Does pole sports even have a men's division?

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Wait, there's a sport for that? I'm totally in. Now to round up a team of nacho ninjettes for this.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOyQBSMeIhM

  5. #65
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    Do you think these sports could be merged?

    Men's pole sports would be right up there with men's rhythmic gymnastics for me.

    As for chasing the cheese down the hill, are there international competitions? Is it fair to the lactose-intolerent Asian and African nations?
    Gene Ching
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  6. #66
    Hmmmmm,if today i make a baby he will be ready for Olympics of 2020.

  7. #67
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    good time to start then

    train him in chasing cheese and pole sports.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #68
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    Wre're headed to Tokyo

    Istanbul would have been crazy...
    Madrid and Istanbul Respond Differently to Rejection by Olympics
    Daniel Ochoa De Olza/Associated Press
    Spaniards had hoped that a Madrid Olympic Games could create jobs and revive the country's economy.
    By RAPHAEL MINDER and CEYLAN YEGINSU
    Published: September 8, 2013

    MADRID — Madrid and Istanbul started counting the costs on Sunday of failing once more to be named an Olympic host, after Tokyo was chosen to organize the 2020 Games.

    That cost could be higher for Madrid, whose population, hit hard by record unemployment and a long recession, had rallied around the idea that the Games could help create jobs and revive the image and economy of Spain.

    In contrast, large groups of people in the central Taksim district in Istanbul celebrated their city’s Olympic defeat on Saturday night. They argued that the Turkish government had tried to use the Olympics as an excuse to ignore environmental concerns and proceed with large-scale building projects.

    With 80 percent of its earmarked Olympic venues already completed, Madrid’s bid was centered on a straightforward argument: we have built the sites already, so let us at least use them.

    Madrid, Spain’s capital and largest city, now faces a new challenge, as it scrambles to reduce $9.2 billion in debt as it figures out what to do with some of its half-built or underused sports centers, including a water sports complex that was to serve as the Olympic swimming pool. Construction on the aquatic center started in 2004, but the work was halted four years later amid budget overruns as Spain’s construction bubble burst.

    Among Madrid’s other underexploited flagship sites is the Caja Mágica, or Magic Box, a tennis center with a retractable roof that opened in 2009, with intentions of holding Olympic events. The center ended up costing $387 million, compared with an initial budget of $158 million, but it has been used little since, except for a Masters tennis tournament held each May.

    The voting was carried out in Buenos Aires by secret ballot, making it impossible to know why members of the International Olympic Committee favored Tokyo over Istanbul and Madrid. But a negative factor shared by the two losing cities, their countries’ response to doping in sports, might have played a role.

    Turkey recently announced a “zero tolerance” stance on doping after a string of positive test results that led to the ban of more than 30 athletes by the Turkish Athletics Federation. In 2011, however, Turkey lost its World Anti-Doping Agency accreditation after failing to comply with international standards.

    A Spanish judge fueled international criticism in April, when she ordered that about 200 bags of blood and plasma be destroyed instead of handing them over to antidoping inspectors. The bags were among evidence seized by the police during a cycling investigation focusing on Eufemiano Fuentes, a Spanish doctor found guilty of endangering public health by providing blood transfusions to cyclists. During his trial, Fuentes said his list of clients also included unnamed athletes from soccer, tennis, boxing and track and field.

    The Madrid delegation hoped that the investigation had been put to rest, but the doping issue was raised Saturday before the vote in Buenos Aires, both during Madrid’s presentation to the Olympic delegates and in a news conference.

    A few hours later, after Madrid was rejected, disenchantment and sadness spread rapidly among the large crowd that had gathered around Puerta de Alcalá, one of Madrid’s landmarks, where local musicians performed before the vote.

    In Istanbul, however, recent social divisions were highlighted Saturday as supporters and opponents of the Olympics gathered at separate sites. After Istanbul failed in its fifth Olympic bid, some cried and others embraced in the ancient square of Sultanahmet. Most just stood still, lowering their Turkish flags.

    In Taksim Square, those who had opposed the bid celebrated late into the night. Taksim had been turned into a battleground in June after disputes over the razing of a public park evolved into the largest antigovernment rally the country had had in more than a decade. Analysts have said that one of the largest setbacks for Turkey’s Olympic bid was the government’s harsh crackdown on the protesters.

    “We’ve been tear-gassed too many times to have any Olympic spirit left in us,” said Ali Turan, an architect who has been active with the “Boycott Istanbul 2020” campaign in Istanbul. “This city has to learn to value its people and environment before it makes any promises to the world.”

    The campaign was led by a group of urban planners and architects who carried out an assessment of Istanbul’s candidate file and concluded that it was a “megaconstruction pitch,” devoid of the Olympic ideals of legacy, spirit and sustainability.

    “In Turkey’s candidate file, there are no environmental assessments, no ecological consideration or evaluations of social impacts for those that will be displaced from their homes,” the group said via e-mail.

    Separately, clashes between the police and students at Middle East Technical University in Ankara began Friday and continued into Saturday, with the police firing tear gas and water cannons at demonstrators who were protesting deforestation on their campus. The deforestation was led by the city to accommodate a road project.

    After the Olympic vote, Ankara’s mayor, Melih Gokcek, wrote on Twitter that the antigovernment protesters were traitors who caused Istanbul to lose its bid.

    Ceylan Yeginsu reported from Istanbul.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #69
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    and Wrestling is back in...

    They need new uniforms for women like TKD.

    Wrestling, IOC make right moves in getting sport back on 2020 Olympics program
    By Tracee Hamilton, Published: September 8

    The International Olympic Committee made the right decision — and how often do we hear that? — when it voted Sunday to return wrestling, at least provisionally, to the Olympic program.

    The fact that wrestling, one of the original Olympic sports — and I don’t mean original as in 1896, but original as in 708 B.C. — had to fight for its Olympic life was a defibrillator to the heart of the sport’s leadership and community: shocking, painful, and probably life-saving. Losing the international platform of the Olympics would have had a trickle-down effect, at least in this country, to college and high school programs.

    The sport is resinstated for the 2020 and 2024 Games seven months after losing its spot, beating out baseball-softball and squash.

    The 2020 Summer Olympics goes to Tokyo: The Japanese capital beats out Madrid and Istanbul for the honor of hosting the international athletic spectacle.

    In February, the IOC voted on 25 “core” sports that would make up the Olympic program beginning with the 2020 Games. In a stunning move, wrestling was not on the list. To the sport’s credit, it immediately began grappling (couldn’t resist) with its perceived problems. Three days after the IOC’s decision, Raphael Martinetti resigned as president of FILA, the sport’s international governing body. Nenad Lalovic of Serbia was named acting president, and the sport immediately turned its attention to problems with its rules, gender equity and the internal workings of FILA.

    On May 18, FILA met in Moscow to vote on the changes, and Lalovic was elected president, losing the “acting” from his title. Eleven days later, the IOC trimmed its list of eight possible sports for 2020 to three — and wrestling made the cut. The timing was no coincidence.

    Baseball-softball and squash also made it to Sunday’s final vote. The pairing of baseball and softball is not advantageous to softball, but that sport has not spread as far or as fast as organizers hoped when it was added to the Games. It’s a loss for U.S. fans, because the American team was always good and fun to watch. Wrestling got 49 votes; the baseball-softball bid got 24 and squash got 22.

    Karate, roller sports, sport climbing, wakeboarding and wushu were on the original list of eight possible inclusions, and the idea that this was wrestling’s competition was pretty sad, but indicative of the problems the IOC perceived in the running of the international body and the rules of the sport.

    FILA changed some of its inner workings. It added two weight classes for women in time for the 2016 Games. And it adopted new rules that will make the action more aggressive. There will be less stalling and more scoring, and the winner will be decided on total points, not the best two-of-three periods. Stalling will be penalized. Offensive takedowns will earn two points. The matches will be faster and more exciting.

    Wrestling needed that. The sport had changed quite a bit since 708 B.C. but not so much since 1896 — at least not enough. The world is more fast-paced, and the Olympics are trying to keep up. Even creaky sports like modern pentathlon — which I love, by the way — have avoided the chopping block by shortening their formats and creating more action.

    The Committee for the Preservation of Olympic Wrestling moved quickly and boldly to improve the sport, at least by the standards of the IOC, and while the changes may not seem great to purists, the fact is wrestling needs the Olympics more than the Olympics needs wrestling. Sadly, the sport is still on trial; wrestling will be on the 2016 program and Sunday’s vote means it will be included in 2020 and 2024 as a provisional sport, which means it will continue to have to fight for its place in the Games.

    Wrestling has 177 federations on six continents. At the 2012 Games in London, a record-setting 71 countries qualified for the Olympics, with 29 winning medals. That’s an impressive number, but without the Olympics, a wrestler’s ultimate goal would be the world championships, which get almost no attention.

    The Olympics are not perfect: the haughty corruption of the IOC, the annoyance of NBC’s “packaging,” the debt and abandoned buildings they often leave in their wake, the failed drug tests, and on and on. But they have always been a favorite with me because every four years, we are able to see sports that otherwise don’t garner a lot of media attention, at least not in this country. Wrestling, modern pentathlon, team handball, Nordic combined — those are truly Olympic sports.

    The IOC made the right decision Sunday. We should savor it — it happens with even less frequency than the Olympics themselves.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #70
    This pleases me. I watched it real time and I was happy to see such margins. I would take wrestling over all the other options. Not even a thought. Now we have over a decade to get our house in better order and start lobbying now. No matter what is brought in, you can't take out wrestling. That is just retarded. That would be like taking out the 100m or high jump. I mean... COME ON!!!

  11. #71
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    wrestling, one of the oldest Olympic sports and they decided to take it out.....WTF is wrong with people. Glad they have gotten their wits back about them and put it back. One of the few Olympic sports I actually watch, (besides the Judo comps.)
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i had an old taichi lady talk smack behind my back. i mean comon man, come on. if it was 200 years ago,, mebbe i wouldve smacked her and took all her monehs.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i am manly and strong. do not insult me cracker.

  12. #72
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    ***Applause***

    Yay, wrestling is back!

    I was floored when they removed it. I mean, the first games were foot races, then boxing, wrestling and pankration which is a combination of boxing and wrestling, followed by chariot racing, discus and javelin throwing. Unless I'm mistaken, which is always a possibility, that was pretty much it for centuries. To remove a core event like wrestling was just stupid crazy.

  13. #73
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    Read the NYT article I posted earlier Dragonzbane

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonzbane76 View Post
    wrestling, one of the oldest Olympic sports and they decided to take it out.....WTF is wrong with people. Glad they have gotten their wits back about them and put it back. One of the few Olympic sports I actually watch, (besides the Judo comps.)
    I was as upset as any of us to hear Wrestling was out, but after reading this article (skip down to the 2nd post for the Wrestling info, I'm surprised it stayed in so long. It wasn't about the sport itself. It was about the international governing body overseeing the sport. After working with some NGBs, I completely understand how this could happen.
    Gene Ching
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  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Men's pole sports would be right up there with men's rhythmic gymnastics for me.
    Both are wrong, but not as wrong as Olympic shooting. At least they have to move and sweat.

    As for the lactose-intolerant people... well they can chase a pumpkin.

  15. #75
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    from what I read on your article it seems like someone dropped the ball on the wrestling side of the negotiations, of course it could be on both. I don't really like them changing rules per say, but it's not a bad thing for them to enact the takedown 2 point rule. I think it would add a bit more excitement. someone messed up for sure.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i had an old taichi lady talk smack behind my back. i mean comon man, come on. if it was 200 years ago,, mebbe i wouldve smacked her and took all her monehs.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i am manly and strong. do not insult me cracker.

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