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Thread: Looking for a book or source discussing the cinematography of a movie fight sequence.

  1. #1

    Looking for a book or source discussing the cinematography of a movie fight sequence.

    Does anyone know of any good books or sources that discusses in detail the cinematography of fight sequences in films?

    I already own "Fight Choreography: The Art of Non-Verbal Dialogue" and its very useful, but I'm looking for something that explains more of the cinematography aspect of filming a fight scene.

  2. #2
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    you should get john krengs book..its the most comprehensive book on fights scenes i have seen in a while.

    http://www.amazon.com/Fight-Choreogr...rds=john+kreng


    also join the facebook page. many stunt and fight choreographers on there you could talk too

  3. #3
    Thanks for the facebook page suggestion! Are you a film student or filmmaker as well?

  4. #4
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    im a professional filmmaker. been in the business for almost ten years.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gweilo_Fist View Post
    Does anyone know of any good books or sources that discusses in detail the cinematography of fight sequences in films?

    I already own "Fight Choreography: The Art of Non-Verbal Dialogue" and its very useful, but I'm looking for something that explains more of the cinematography aspect of filming a fight scene.
    Some friends of mine at different times, participated in workshops and seminars about fight choreography at local universities and they found they learned alot about how to show certain aspects of cinematographic skill so perhaps actual participation in one of these will give first hand experience.
    As you mention this, here are two angles from scenes from The Last Samurai that was interesting. The long shot sequence (my terminology may be ineffective but) whre they show encounter as it is happenning then they go to closer shot to' time frame the 'intricacy (technique) ,panning in closer to showcase the fine tuned skill of encounter

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjU1XA3PHn4
    I just happened to see this last week!

  6. #6
    Hmmm, I'll definitely consider searching for seminars on the subject. Unfortunately, where I live, there's not a whole lot of those available within AT LEAST a 6 hour radius.

    I'm in my first year of film school and I've learned so much about filmmaking, but I think most film schools, even the best ones, lack teaching ways to effectively shoot a marital arts fight sequence. I'm not complaining. I think it's completely understandable, but it just means that I need to look outside the film school to learn these proper techniques.

    I'm just curious to know what type of lenses and T/F-Stops tend to be used more often in popular Chinese martial arts movies or what specific Cinematographers/Directors like to use, because it obviously is a personal stylistic choice. If it is possible to get that kind of info, that would be awesome.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gweilo_Fist View Post
    Hmmm, I'll definitely consider searching for seminars on the subject. Unfortunately, where I live, there's not a whole lot of those available within AT LEAST a 6 hour radius.

    I'm in my first year of film school and I've learned so much about filmmaking, but I think most film schools, even the best ones, lack teaching ways to effectively shoot a marital arts fight sequence. I'm not complaining. I think it's completely understandable, but it just means that I need to look outside the film school to learn these proper techniques.

    I'm just curious to know what type of lenses and T/F-Stops tend to be used more often in popular Chinese martial arts movies or what specific Cinematographers/Directors like to use, because it obviously is a personal stylistic choice. If it is possible to get that kind of info, that would be awesome.
    most kung fu fights are undercranked, so instead of shooting at 24 frames, you would shoot at 21-22 frames, some even 19-20 frames per second. your F-stop depends on you. if you want to keep you fight in focus you wants to be at around 5.6 and hire...but there is also a stylistic approach, their is no real recipe on how to shoot a fight scene. my advice to use is to go watch movies...specifically from sammo hong, lau ka leung and jackie chan. those guys know how to shoot fight scenes.. look at it less as a fan and more as a student, and youll gain a wealth of information.

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