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Thread: Let's Talk about Weapons

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by MightyB View Post
    I don't know where this thread will go, but a good start is discussing favorite weapons, drills, and forms - with links whenever possible.
    slicing the pie

    25th generation inner door disciple of Chen Style Practical Wombat Method
    Officially certified by Ethiopian Orthodox patriarch Abune Mathias
    grandmaster instructor of Wombat Combat™®LLC Practical Wombat Method. international academy retreat

  2. #17
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    To me there's no reason why TCMA can't supplant Filipino Martial Arts as the Arts of choice for practical weapons proficiency.
    The big reason is that FMA schools ALL teach weapon skills by drills and sparring, whereas the bulk of TCMA skills just teach 1 and 2 man forms. Having done Kali the single stick work is pretty much identical to Dao, they just understand it better. As such I teach a variety of single and double stick drills to teach Dao skills.
    "The man who stands for nothing is likely to fall for anything"
    www.swindonkungfu.co.uk

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yum Cha View Post
    There's a book, Shubumi - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shibumi_(novel) that's all about an assassin that uses common objects as weapons. Great adventure read.

    Weapons can be anything. Weapons training to me is more about the use of that core object than the weapon in detail. A cricket bat, baseball bat, cane, Dao, all have similar application, with adjustments for weight. Long staff, med staff, rattan staff, shovel, broom, kwan dao.

    Translating skills across weapons is a good objective in weapons training in my own opinion.
    I also have a personal thing about not getting attached to any weapon as an object, any one will do, so I get used to accommodating differences in balance, weight, feel, etc..

    Favorite non standard weapon I've seen is two pieces of Angle Iron along the forearms, wrapped with an ace bandage, under a light jacket.
    Ah, Nicolai Hel...good stuff !
    Improvised weaponry should be a must and, with a good core in edge and impact weapons, it is easy to turn anything into a weapon.
    Key is principles over specific techniques.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    True. Funny, I just posted a news bit on our Bad Day for Samurai Wannabes thread about a sword and mop attack and this reminds me of that.

    Actually, I misspoke a little on that. Kendo was my main practice but along with that I dabbled in Iaido and Battojitsu. While those arts could translate to stick, they are really skills for edged weapons, so there's more drawing or pulling of the cut as opposed to blunt bashing with a stick.

    Good one, MK. True to your namesake.
    My time training the Yagyu shinkage kenjutsu with the bokuto instilled some stick work that I still use to day.
    Very few impact weapons can match a good quality bokuto.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  5. #20
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    Before I stopped training with my first master I loved the weapons stuff: main weapons were 6ft and 7ft staffs, butterfly knifes, dao, cane shield and single knife, spear and tigerfork (still got a hand made tigerfork under my bed which was given to me do some students and sifu I helped teach)

    When I was solely doing MMA and grappling I stopped all weapon work and developed a dislike for it, now im back also training TCMA my current sifu has a boatload of weapons to teach lol, his masters family arts weapons are legion, add in CLF sets from both hung sing and buck sing we have picked up, the wing chun pole and knifes, and the hakka arts weapons and there are too many to think about lol They are good for body conditioning coordination etc but I can take or leave most of them

    The weapons I actually train week in and week out are the pole (our family short pole form, buk sing pole form and the wing chun 6 and a half point form) and the butterfly knifes although I prefer the hakka arts sets to the wing chun or hung gar stuff. I like the pole as it help develop waist power and is practical, i like the butterfly knifes because they are fun We also spar pole against knifes regularly. We also work the ratten sticks as well single and double now and then

  6. #21
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    Weapons training gives you something that MAY be lost in strictly bare handed fighting and that is a respect for footwork.
    Many times in sparring we will "take a shot to give a shot" or to move in, it's a sacrifice play and while still done with footwork to minimize the damage, it can easily degrade.
    With weapons and the healthy respect one gets when you get a good solid wack, you learn the immense importance of footwork and angles.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Weapons training gives you something that MAY be lost in strictly bare handed fighting and that is a respect for footwork.
    Many times in sparring we will "take a shot to give a shot" or to move in, it's a sacrifice play and while still done with footwork to minimize the damage, it can easily degrade.
    With weapons and the healthy respect one gets when you get a good solid wack, you learn the immense importance of footwork and angles.
    yep when we spar butterfly knifes v 6 ft pole (we use a pvc pole but still hurts when hit with it) its the footwork and angling that you really have to watch, as you say i dont mind trading shots empty hand (at 6ft and 230pounds i have an advantage most of the time) , when a 6ft weapon is coming at me my footwork improves alot

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    yep when we spar butterfly knifes v 6 ft pole (we use a pvc pole but still hurts when hit with it) its the footwork and angling that you really have to watch, as you say i dont mind trading shots empty hand (at 6ft and 230pounds i have an advantage most of the time) , when a 6ft weapon is coming at me my footwork improves alot
    On the button.
    When I started doing padded stick work ( Padded as inprotective gear is being worn) I realized that the gear gave me enough protection VS rattan sticks that I was "taking a shot to give a shot" without really noticing it that much.
    I stopped the padded body sparring and went with padded sticks and it was an eye opener.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    On the button.
    When I started doing padded stick work ( Padded as inprotective gear is being worn) I realized that the gear gave me enough protection VS rattan sticks that I was "taking a shot to give a shot" without really noticing it that much.
    I stopped the padded body sparring and went with padded sticks and it was an eye opener.
    yep and suddenly some of the silly stances in some of the forms dont seem so silly when a weapon is coming at your head, at your kneecap or straight down the middle trying to spike you in the chest lol,

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    yep and suddenly some of the silly stances in some of the forms dont seem so silly when a weapon is coming at your head, at your kneecap or straight down the middle trying to spike you in the chest lol,
    Welcome to forms revelation 101, LOL !
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  11. #26
    Along with what you guys are saying about weapons sparring and drills...

    Gene - do you think Tiger Claw could stock some polypropylene swords like these?



  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Welcome to forms revelation 101, LOL !
    maybe TCMA works better with weapons in hand than lol

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    maybe TCMA works better with weapons in hand than lol
    This is what I think, and it's not a bad thing or a negative at all against TCMA. Marketing 101 is to define or create your niche and then own your market. I think it's entirely possible for TCMA to dominate and own the weapons niche. If we can translate solid skills to improvised weaponry...

  14. #29
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    Everything works better with weapons in hand.
    Imagine the damage a boxer can do with a push dagger in each fist.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Everything works better with weapons in hand.
    Imagine the damage a boxer can do with a push dagger in each fist.
    Horrifying to think about - make sure yours is bigger if you come across that situation.

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