Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 42

Thread: Hung Gar Training Routine

  1. #16
    You can't really hit a wooden dummy like you can a bag. Although it is good strike conditioning.

    I would even say buying something like this is a good deal http://www.everythingwingchun.com/Ev...22-v3-cnvs.htm
    Then fill it with rice, rice is probably not as hard as beans and you can get rice cheaply in bulk usually Walmart has big bags or shop through amazon etc. Then as you progress you can change the filling material. I think a normal striking bag for boxing or such might be a little tougher than if you filled this with rice, not sure. So it might give you an easier adjustment to starting out. Also you can change the material where as a normal bag you cannot. I have an indentation starting on my bag from where I punch it with this I don't think that would happen, with loose material after all.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,392
    I can't say for that particular bag, but I have a wallbag from everythingwingchun.com and it is great. Good price and good product. They also have awesome customer service
    It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand. - Apache Proverb

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Raipizo View Post
    You can't really hit a wooden dummy like you can a bag. Although it is good strike conditioning.

    I would even say buying something like this is a good deal http://www.everythingwingchun.com/Ev...22-v3-cnvs.htm
    Then fill it with rice, rice is probably not as hard as beans and you can get rice cheaply in bulk usually Walmart has big bags or shop through amazon etc. Then as you progress you can change the filling material. I think a normal striking bag for boxing or such might be a little tougher than if you filled this with rice, not sure. So it might give you an easier adjustment to starting out. Also you can change the material where as a normal bag you cannot. I have an indentation starting on my bag from where I punch it with this I don't think that would happen, with loose material after all.
    Thanks, I'll look into it..

    Like JamesC, I have a Wing Chun type wall bag that I like to use in the winter when I can't practice on my makeshift wooden dummy outside. I don't know how effective it would be for Zhongue Quanfa compared to a punching bag, as I used my wall bag mainly for conditioning. I've heard after rice, you fill your bag with sand then iron pieces?

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    South FL. Which is not to be confused with any part of the USA
    Posts
    9,297
    those CLF haymakers, like a lot of other 'long' arm strikes, are contraindicated for shoulder health...your shoulder joint is extended and when you meet near 100% resistance, you start tearing ****.
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackEChan View Post
    Thanks, I'll look into it..

    Like JamesC, I have a Wing Chun type wall bag that I like to use in the winter when I can't practice on my makeshift wooden dummy outside. I don't know how effective it would be for Zhongue Quanfa compared to a punching bag, as I used my wall bag mainly for conditioning. I've heard after rice, you fill your bag with sand then iron pieces?
    I would say rice, then possibly some kind of gravel and possibly iron bbs. Sand would wear out the bag very easily, even the site from the link I posted talked about that. Yeah wallbags are nice, you can hit them harder than a wooden dummy but I think a hanging bag would be better, but you can at least use that wallbag in the time being.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga US
    Posts
    963
    Quote Originally Posted by Oso View Post
    those CLF haymakers, like a lot of other 'long' arm strikes, are contraindicated for shoulder health...your shoulder joint is extended and when you meet near 100% resistance, you start tearing ****.
    So Choi... sweeping punch.

    You're exactly right when they're performed incorrectly. You'll remove all sorts of needed materials (tendons, ligaments, cartilage) by doing it wrong. You could even do that if you performed it correctly but your target changed its mind.

    However if it's done correctly from day one training with a proper understanding of the basics, that's not likely to happen. This goes without saying, it applies to everything with the same cavaet.
    Message: Due to the ongoing Recession, God has decided the light at the end of the tunnel will be shut off due to power costs. That is all.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Shell Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,664
    Blog Entries
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by Oso View Post
    those CLF haymakers, like a lot of other 'long' arm strikes, are contraindicated for shoulder health...your shoulder joint is extended and when you meet near 100% resistance, you start tearing ****.
    It depends on where you will hit. If you hit on your opponent's body, the shock may hurt your shoulder or elbow joint. If you hit on your opponent's head, your shoulder and elbow joint should be stronger than your opponent's neck joint.

    Most of the TCMA systems train the "3 stars striking". If you have "Peng Jin" in your arm, use your body rotation to pull your arm, and allow the shock to transfer back to your body, you should be OK.

    I have always believed that "combat" and "health" are contradict to each other. All combat with body contact will not be good for health. "Combat" such as a punch to your opponent's face is neither good for your own "health" nor good for your opponent's "health". The "haymaker" is no different.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 01-16-2013 at 01:15 PM.
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
    Less opinion -> less argument
    No opinion -> no argument

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    South FL. Which is not to be confused with any part of the USA
    Posts
    9,297
    with all due respect to everyone: i don't care what you say, if you strike with a fully extended arm and your elbow is is rotated any more than 90 degrees (ie,pointing upwards vs. to the side or downward, also indicated by the thumb pointing downward as contact is made with the fist or the hand) you shoulder is 'open' (sorry, i don't have TGY's terminology). 'open' as in the ball of the upper arm bone is not seated in/against the socket and the stresses are then carried soley on the soft tissues of the rotator cuff. long term, you will end up with tears.

    all you have to do to test this is put your opposite hand on top of your shoulder and lift your elbow. you can feel what happens.
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

  9. #24
    Not deliberately trying to derail the thread...but since we're here...

    I don't throw a haymaker on a heavy bag. It only tales 1 or 2 times to feel like your jacking your shoulder up. But what about mitts or Thai pads? I haven't trained this technique on them, have you guys?

    It seems the Thai pad would be a lot better than the heavy bag, much more give, more like punching a head, instead of the body, which is what you should be doing with that technique. If your keeping a slight bend in the arm, not fully locking it, and hitting the pads with it, do you still think you'll be likely to tear muscles?

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    South FL. Which is not to be confused with any part of the USA
    Posts
    9,297
    ****...had another post to this but it didn't register...

    don't do it.

    bad.

    old chinese doods don't know everything.

    evolve.


    ...summation
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,381
    Quote Originally Posted by Oso View Post
    those CLF haymakers, like a lot of other 'long' arm strikes, are contraindicated for shoulder health...your shoulder joint is extended and when you meet near 100% resistance, you start tearing ****.
    This isnít strictly true and depends on how you hold the arm you are swinging: for example my sifu teaches us to ensure the shoulder stays in front of the body and rather than drift behind it so although you are still using waist power the arm is relatively stiff and stable and doesnít drift backwards and into external rotation. Its exactly like a tight hook you ensure the shouklder is infront of the moving body and not behind. We also try to keep a curve in the arm and a slight bend at the elbow But then our system isnít pure CLF itís a village art also including hung gar and southern si lum.

    Structurally itís a very sound strike and our guys have had no issues using it in Sanda and sparring and on the bags, ive used it in MMA sparring and on bags
    Yes you can use it on thai pads thatís how we train it for the most part.

    and our sifu is also a physical therapist and been doing this stuff for 3 decades

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    South FL. Which is not to be confused with any part of the USA
    Posts
    9,297
    my longer post that didn't make it up somehow explained my thoughts further...'extended' as i used it was perhaps not the best word...'rotated out of socket' is more correct.

    not in the mood to type it up again just now.
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,392
    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    This isnít strictly true and depends on how you hold the arm you are swinging: for example my sifu teaches us to ensure the shoulder stays in front of the body and rather than drift behind it so although you are still using waist power the arm is relatively stiff and stable and doesnít drift backwards and into external rotation. Its exactly like a tight hook you ensure the shouklder is infront of the moving body and not behind. We also try to keep a curve in the arm and a slight bend at the elbow But then our system isnít pure CLF itís a village art also including hung gar and southern si lum.

    Structurally itís a very sound strike and our guys have had no issues using it in Sanda and sparring and on the bags, ive used it in MMA sparring and on bags
    Yes you can use it on thai pads thatís how we train it for the most part.

    and our sifu is also a physical therapist and been doing this stuff for 3 decades
    I've really battered my shoulders before when I let myself get lazy on hooks. Ouch.
    It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand. - Apache Proverb

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,381
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesC View Post
    I've really battered my shoulders before when I let myself get lazy on hooks. Ouch.
    we all get injuries when we get lazy, the fact is all striking is a risk reward situation and you have to way up whether the pros of a punch outway its cons, the wide hook (haymaker if you like) and over hand are very powerful weapons and you are seeing them used more and more in MMA, jim millers last fight for example because they offer a way to upset and put the opponent on the backfoot or drop him very quickly

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    South FL. Which is not to be confused with any part of the USA
    Posts
    9,297
    fwiw, my opinion is based on my own experience, the experience of people i have trained with over the course of 28 years AND the opinion of the ortho who repaired my shoulder.

    with the spine as a vertical reference point, if you connect with your fist/forearm while the elbow is pointed more than 90 degrees up from the side, you are opening up the joint to the point that you are not fully engaging the ball of the joint in to the socket of the joint. therefore, the connective tissues take up the stress.
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •