Page 16 of 20 FirstFirst ... 61415161718 ... LastLast
Results 226 to 240 of 291

Thread: Fast Food Nastiness

  1. #226
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenBrain View Post
    Hahaha! You know I can set the record straight on what a smoothie is. Just to be sure, I looked up Orange Julius recipes and found this...

    1 1/4 cup orange juice
    1 cup water
    3 tablespoons egg white or egg substitute
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/4 cup sugar
    1 1/2 cups ice

    A smoothie by definition is made with fresh fruit with or without yogurt so to me an Orange Julius is not a smoothie. With 1/4 cup of sugar it would seem to be closer to the soft drink family. It may sound weird but I have been off processed sugar for so long now I actually got a little queasy looking at that recipe.

    And, for the record, I'm not consuming anything named poo poo...
    The sugar doesn't surprise me at all. I remember them being rather sweet.

    Does cutting up fresh fruit and freezing it in portions count as "fresh fruit"? I like it better when it's frozen. You get the slushy w/o adding a bunch of ice and watering it down.

  2. #227
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    998
    For the past few years, I have been trying and succeeding (80% of the time) to make my own stuff or cook it myself.
    It is hard to stay away from the easy 'take away' cheap food syndrome. Actually, I went to KFC 2 hours ago and got a Doubleicious Chicken/bacon sandwich

  3. #228
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    766
    Quote Originally Posted by Syn7 View Post
    Does cutting up fresh fruit and freezing it in portions count as "fresh fruit"? I like it better when it's frozen. You get the slushy w/o adding a bunch of ice and watering it down.
    That's the way we do it too. Frozen fruit is just fresh fruit locked into a state of suspended animation, so I'd say yes it counts. Do you freeze your bananas also? We buy bunches and bunches and cut them up as soon as we get home. I normally have 2 or three large zips of them in the freezer along with strawberries, mango, blueberries, pineapple and peaches. I think it's smoothie time...

  4. #229
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,085

    Oh Yum....

    Y'all know how much I luv it when an OT thread goes on topic. To quote MickeyD "I'm loving it".
    McDonald's, Yum Suspend Meat Supplier in China
    OSI's Shanghai Husi 'Appalled' by Allegation That Chicken, Beef Was Past Expiration Date
    By Laurie Burkitt, Jacob Bunge and Julie Jargon

    Updated July 21, 2014 12:47 p.m. ET


    Workers at Shanghai Husi Food Co. in Shanghai. Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

    BEIJING—The U.S. owner of a meat supplier in Shanghai apologized and promised a swift response Monday after McDonald's Corp. MCD -1.29% and Yum Brands Inc. YUM +0.47% suspended purchases in China in the wake of allegations it sold expired chicken and beef to restaurants.

    McDonald's and Yum, parent of KFC and Pizza Hut, said they halted orders from Shanghai Husi Food Co., owned by OSI Group Inc. of Aurora Ill., after local Chinese media reported that Shanghai Husi was selling meat products beyond their shelf life.

    OSI, a longtime supplier to both fast-food companies, said its executives were "appalled" by the report and apologized to its customers and consumers. The company "has formed an investigation team, is fully cooperating with inspections being conducted by relevant, supervising government agencies, and is also conducting its own internal review," it said.

    OSI said it thinks the media report showcased an "isolated event" but "takes full responsibility for the situation and will take appropriate actions swiftly." A spokeswoman declined to comment further.

    Closely held OSI, which had $6.1 billion in sales last year and ranks among the largest U.S. meat processors, has been active in China since 1991 and currently operates in eight cities there, producing meat as well as produce. OSI began supplying McDonald's Chinese operations in 1992, and Yum in 2008, according to the meat processor's website.

    China's official Xinhua News Agency said Monday that government officials suspended the operations of Shanghai Husi, whose officials in China didn't respond to requests for comment.

    Food safety is a major concern in China, where food-borne illness and food adulteration are common occurrences and scandals over tainted food products have roiled the meat and dairy industries in recent years. Many consumers shop for import brands and foreign labels, which are believed to have higher standards of quality control.

    McDonald's spokeswoman Heidi Barker said Monday that if the practices described in media reports were confirmed, they would be "completely unacceptable to McDonald's."

    The company has switched to other suppliers, and was cooperating fully with authorities investigating the issue, Ms. Barker said. She added that a small percentage of McDonald's restaurants in China may have to stop selling a few items on their menus for a day or two while McDonald's obtains meat from other companies.

    McDonald's, which has more than 2,000 outlets in China, has been trying to solidify its standing with Chinese consumers. The company faced tough times in the country last year, with sales at stores open 12 months or more down 3.6% compared with 2012.

    The development could be a setback for Yum, which has just begun to recover from food-safety issues that had dogged the company for more than a year.

    A Chinese media report in November 2012 alleged that two KFC chicken suppliers had been using growth hormones and excessive levels of antibiotics to help chickens grow faster. The claims, which quickly spread online, tapped into widespread consumer fears in China over food safety.

    Government officials investigated, and recommended Yum strengthen its poultry supply-chain practices, which Yum said it had done. Still, Yum's sales in China struggled for much of last year, further hurt by a bird-flu outbreak last spring. The company has staged a recovery recently with new menu items and marketing campaigns. Last week, Yum reported that in the second quarter of this year, same-store sales in China rose 15%, driven by 21% growth at KFC. Sales in China account for more than half of Yum's revenue.

    Yum said its decision to stop buying meat from Husi would cause temporary supply shortages for two breakfast products at some KFC restaurants and a beef product at Pizza Hut outlets. Yum said it "will not tolerate any violations of government laws and regulations from our suppliers."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #230
    If you go to a place that sells crap and you order crap, you shouldn't be surprised when you get crap. Every once in a while I forget how bad that stuff makes me feel while at the same time remembering how tasty some of it can be. I'll eat like a KFC meal with memories of how much I loved it as a kid and walk away in shame with the knowledge that real payment comes later. I'm almost over it though. Once or twice a year, usually when with others who don't abstain.


    I EXPECT the products to be nasty. So yeah, while some of this thread is over the top gross, most of it seems like par for the course as far as I'm concerned. Some of that stuff in China though.... man.... It will be interesting in like 30 years to see these places that have absorbed western fast food culture so quickly. At least we built up to it, and look at our fat broken down asses.

  6. #231
    I just skimmed the last page of the thread. Did I understand right that US fast food chains are selling Chinese meat in the US?
    Last edited by rett2; 07-28-2014 at 01:30 AM.

  7. #232
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    766
    Quote Originally Posted by rett2 View Post
    I just skimmed the last page of the thread. Did I understand right that US fast food chains are selling Chinese meat in the US?
    Yup. The USDA has green-lighted China to sell chicken meat to the USA. What's worse is they don't have to label it as to where the meat comes from or how it's produced. What's even stranger is how chicken producers here are shipping meat to China for processing which will then return to the USA for consumption.

    My answer is either produce your own food or buy local organic...period!

  8. #233
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,893
    I don't trust any food products from China. Period. If something is from China, it should be labeled, or at least there should be some way to be informed about it. Chinese pet food makers were putting toxic crap in them not too long ago. I wouldn't put it past them to do the same with human food. It makes me wonder if it's incompetence, shortcuts, or done purposefully.

    IMO, any American company that sells Chinese food products is negligent.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 07-28-2014 at 02:48 PM.

  9. #234
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    NorthEast Region, N. America
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    I don't trust any food products from China. Period. If something is from China, it should be labeled, or at least there should be some way to be informed about it. Chinese pet food makers were putting toxic crap in them not too long ago. I wouldn't put it past them to do the same with human food. It makes me wonder if it's incompetence, shortcuts, or done purposefully.

    IMO, any American company that sells Chinese food products is negligent.
    Yeah, it's like all these big companies are ruining our health. One mistake I see a lot of "health conscious" people do is they eat Edamame, which usually comes from China (says it right on the package). I like seafood and all too, but after Fukushima disaster I am suspicious of a lot of Pacific Ocean fish (like tuna.)

  10. #235
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    766
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    I don't trust any food products from China. Period. If something is from China, it should be labeled, or at least there should be some way to be informed about it. Chinese pet food makers were putting toxic crap in them not too long ago. I wouldn't put it past them to do the same with human food. It makes me wonder if it's incompetence, shortcuts, or done purposefully.

    IMO, any American company that sells Chinese food products is negligent.


    Quote Originally Posted by MarathonTmatt View Post
    Yeah, it's like all these big companies are ruining our health. One mistake I see a lot of "health conscious" people do is they eat Edamame, which usually comes from China (says it right on the package). I like seafood and all too, but after Fukushima disaster I am suspicious of a lot of Pacific Ocean fish (like tuna.)

    I'm with you both.

    The Fukushima thing has me turned off ocean fish permanently. I'll take pictures later in the year when I get the aquaponics operation up and running again. I'm all about raising my own meat at this point. Hahaha, that sounded dirty... You know what I mean though. As far as meat goes we only eat chicken, turkey, fish and some wild game that I hunt like deer and some various birds, oh and the occasional organic grass fed bison from a local farm my friend owns. You can't trust anybody unless it's local enough for you to verify exactly how they are running things.

    Just because it's raised in the good ol USA doesn't mean it's safe or ethical either. Take the term natural. According to the legal description it is basically anything that isn't synthetic. Organic, well farms can actually add some percentage of synthetic pesticides and these farms are inspected only once a year, so you really can't be 100% on that one either. Free range only means that once a year the farm has to provide access for the animals to go outside. I used to live in chicken farm central in NC and the place right next to me would harvest chickens 3 times a year. They were free range but lived in long barns by the thousands all year long. They would open the doors of the barn but the stupid chickens were ALWAYS too scared to leave. So they closed the door in the evening and fulfilled their obligation to the term free range. It's ridiculous!!!

    Here's something that will help a little bit with produce if you don't have a local source. I'm not entirely sure how to tell about meat and other products yet but I'll post that when I find out.

    Name:  Be a stickler.jpg
Views: 126
Size:  20.0 KB


    I'm fortunate that I can produce much of my own produce, and have very trusted local organic sources for meat and produce. My hope is by next year we'll be completely self sufficient for both meat and produce.

  11. #236
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    oregon
    Posts
    96
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenBrain View Post
    You can't trust anybody unless it's local enough for you to verify exactly how they are running things.
    Living in the current state of total information overload I find it easiest to frame the situation like this: If you don't know the producer, you're certainly eating something you wouldn't choose/don't want. GMO, hormones, antibiotics, fraudulent ingredients, radiation, you-name-it - it's all in there -- guaranteed!
    Quote Originally Posted by bawang View Post
    if the epitome of CMA is dancing like a transgender Uyghur acrobat with down syndrome, then by all means.

  12. #237
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    NorthEast Region, N. America
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenBrain View Post
    I'm with you both.

    The Fukushima thing has me turned off ocean fish permanently. I'll take pictures later in the year when I get the aquaponics operation up and running again. I'm all about raising my own meat at this point. Hahaha, that sounded dirty... You know what I mean though. As far as meat goes we only eat chicken, turkey, fish and some wild game that I hunt like deer and some various birds, oh and the occasional organic grass fed bison from a local farm my friend owns. You can't trust anybody unless it's local enough for you to verify exactly how they are running things.

    Just because it's raised in the good ol USA doesn't mean it's safe or ethical either. Take the term natural. According to the legal description it is basically anything that isn't synthetic. Organic, well farms can actually add some percentage of synthetic pesticides and these farms are inspected only once a year, so you really can't be 100% on that one either. Free range only means that once a year the farm has to provide access for the animals to go outside. I used to live in chicken farm central in NC and the place right next to me would harvest chickens 3 times a year. They were free range but lived in long barns by the thousands all year long. They would open the doors of the barn but the stupid chickens were ALWAYS too scared to leave. So they closed the door in the evening and fulfilled their obligation to the term free range. It's ridiculous!!!

    Here's something that will help a little bit with produce if you don't have a local source. I'm not entirely sure how to tell about meat and other products yet but I'll post that when I find out.

    Name:  Be a stickler.jpg
Views: 126
Size:  20.0 KB


    I'm fortunate that I can produce much of my own produce, and have very trusted local organic sources for meat and produce. My hope is by next year we'll be completely self sufficient for both meat and produce.
    Wow, yeah, I wish I ate more locally grown food. There are a couple really nice Thai restaurants in my area I like to eat at- the food is surprisingly fresh and the Hindu people who work at the big corporation in my area always eat there. Maybe I should frequent some of the local farms more often too. I never knew about some of those technical things about what it means to be "free range." Also, those produce labels you posted were enlightening- I knew 4 digit was conventional, 5 digit starting with 9 was organic, but I had no idea that a code starting with 8 meant genetically modified.

  13. #238
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    766
    Quote Originally Posted by madhusudan View Post
    Living in the current state of total information overload I find it easiest to frame the situation like this: If you don't know the producer, you're certainly eating something you wouldn't choose/don't want. GMO, hormones, antibiotics, fraudulent ingredients, radiation, you-name-it - it's all in there -- guaranteed!
    I like it. People really should WANT to know where their food comes from and how it's produced. It's always a bit shocking to me when I encounter people who are completely baffled by this process. I've met adults who don't even know what animal a pork chop is cut from. Seriously, "pork" should give it away. Try discussing GMO, hormones, antibiotics...etc. with some of these sheltered souls and you get the stunned mullet look. At that point I try to create distance between me and them, much like avoiding somebody with a highly contagious disease that I want no part of.

  14. #239
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    766
    Quote Originally Posted by MarathonTmatt View Post
    Wow, yeah, I wish I ate more locally grown food. There are a couple really nice Thai restaurants in my area I like to eat at- the food is surprisingly fresh and the Hindu people who work at the big corporation in my area always eat there. Maybe I should frequent some of the local farms more often too. I never knew about some of those technical things about what it means to be "free range." Also, those produce labels you posted were enlightening- I knew 4 digit was conventional, 5 digit starting with 9 was organic, but I had no idea that a code starting with 8 meant genetically modified.

    I loves me some Thai food!

    I couldn't agree more with visiting some of the local farms. If you have a farmers market then go there for sure. Besides buying what you need to eat throughout the growing season you can sometimes set up deliveries of produce to your house as long as you buy in bulk. This is a good way for non gardening types to get a plethora of food at a cheap price for canning, freezing, drying...etc. A few deliveries and you're set for the winter months. If you're lucky you'll find real free range chicken eggs and other goodies like local raw honey, or possibly fresh made yogurt...stuff like that.

    It makes me sad, even angry when I think about how large commercial operations treat their animals during production. So, since I can't take back all the support I gave them during my ignorant years I can at least choose to not support them now. That's why it's extremely important to me to encourage home production of food as well as local farmers markets where you're more likely to encounter people who treat their animals humanely.

  15. #240
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenBrain View Post
    Yup. The USDA has green-lighted China to sell chicken meat to the USA. What's worse is they don't have to label it as to where the meat comes from or how it's produced. What's even stranger is how chicken producers here are shipping meat to China for processing which will then return to the USA for consumption.

    My answer is either produce your own food or buy local organic...period!
    Thanks, good to know.

    Not even having to label it? Sometimes I get lulled into believing in progress and then the powers that be go and take an ugly step in the wrong direction.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •