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Thread: Fast Food Nastiness

  1. #271
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    Burger King fail

    You just gotta wonder what the ad people are thinking sometimes...


    Burger King remove 'racist' chopsticks ad

    By Kris Bramwell & Kerry Allen
    BBC News & BBC Monitoring
    3 hours ago


    BURGER KING/INSTAGRAM
    The Burger King advert has been described as racist by some Twitter users

    Burger King has removed an advert which shows western people trying to eat a burger with oversized red chopsticks following criticism on social media.

    The advert for a new Vietnamese burger in New Zealand has sparked a debate over whether the advert is harmless fun or culturally insensitive and racist.

    A clip of the advert posted to Twitter by Maria Mo, a Korean woman living in New Zealand, has been viewed more than 2.9M times.

    Skip Twitter post by @mariahmocarey

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    마리아. Maria.
    @mariahmocarey
    So this is the new Burger King ad for a “Vietnamese” burger ok coolcoolcoolcoolcool CHOPSTICKS R HILARIOUS right omg etc 🙃🙃🙃🙃🙃🙃

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    End of Twitter post by @mariahmocarey
    In her subsequent thread she berates Burger King's attempts to make fun of how Asians eat and described the advert as racist.

    She tweeted: "I'm so sick of racism of any kind. Of the kind that makes fun of different cultures. Say no to every single manifestation of it."

    Others feel equally as strong: "I always thought that Burger King was better than KFC and McDonalds, but now I don't want to eat their products," wrote one disgruntled post on the Chinese micro-blogging platform Weibo.


    DOLCE AND GABBANA/INSTAGRAM
    A scene from Dolce and Gabbana's #DGLovesChina campaign

    Some on social media have likened this to the racism row faced by fashion house Dolce & Gabbana after they posted videos of a Chinese model eating Italian food with chopsticks in 2018.

    Twitter user TatianaKing wrote: "I thought brands learned their lesson after the D&G chopsticks fiasco... then again I'm not surprised."

    In China, the Burger King advert has been viewed more than eight million times on the news website Pear Video and tens of thousands of Weibo users have been posting about it. The hashtag, which translates as #NewBurgerKingAdvertAllegedlyRacist, has also been used more than 12,000 times.

    Not all posts are critical, however. "Whatever anyone does, it's discrimination, we're bursting with persecution and paranoia. What can brands do in the future to introduce Asian elements?" asked one user who had sympathy for Burger King.

    Another saw the funny side of the advert: "This is just a joke that westerners can't use chopsticks. Why is it only in recent years that we hear that Chinese people feel discriminated against? Am I meant to get angry?"

    And others believe those who have been offended by the advert are sensitive and show that people in China have an inferiority complex.

    Burger King has now deleted the clip which appeared on their Instagram account for New Zealand and has withdrawn the television advert. A spokesperson said: "The ad in question is insensitive and does not reflect our brand values regarding diversity and inclusion."
    Gene Ching
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  2. #272
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    Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight

    what

    Is

    HAPPENING?




    Carl’s Jr. is rolling out a CBD burger, but don’t get your hopes too high

    By Maura Judkis
    April 17 at 2:00 PM


    Carl’s Jr.

    If you live in Denver and you’re celebrating 420, the weed-smoker’s holiday, the burger chain Carl’s Jr. has just the thing for your inevitable munchies. The restaurant is debuting a CBD-infused burger, to be sold for $4.20, on Saturday, April 20 (4/20), at a single restaurant in Denver. The burger, which has been named Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight, consists of two beef patties, topped with pickled jalapeños, pepper jack cheese, fries and CBD-infused Santa Fe Sauce. Carl’s Jr. is the first major fast-food chain to put CBD on its menu.

    But if you think you’re going to get blazed off a cheeseburger, bad news: CBD is a non-psychoactive compound in hemp. It does not contain tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the compound in marijuana that makes people feel high. Advocates say it promotes relaxation, diminishes stress and eases pain. In fact, some say that CBD can counteract some of the unpleasant effects of being high on THC — so if you show up to Carl’s Jr. stoned and anxious or paranoid, the burger could mellow out your high.

    CBD has been popping up in lattes, gummies, skin-care products and even pet food: It has become one of the biggest trends of the year and is only expected to grow. The CBD industry got a big boost after the passage of the farm bill earlier this year. When it’s derived from hemp and grown according to strict regulations, its use will be legal nationwide. (Cannabinoids that do not comply with these regulations will remain a Schedule 1 substance.) But for now, it’s a tricky area of the law, because the Food and Drug Administration still hasn’t decided how to regulate CBD products.

    April 20 has become a major branding opportunity for food companies. Even such mainstream brands as Burger King, Denny’s and Chipotle use the opportunity to connect with their customers through cheeky social media posts using stoner lingo. But professionals in the cannabis industry don’t love the pile-on from junk-food brands, which they say promotes negative stereotypes about the lifestyle.

    Though the burger will be available only on Saturday at the Carl’s Jr. restaurant at 4050 Colorado Blvd. in Denver, availability could eventually expand. A company executive told Business Insider that if the test goes well, Carl’s Jr. would consider, ahem, rolling it out across America, though it could face challenges with state regulations.

    Given how much publicity the burger is getting, there’s a good chance that demand on Saturday will be … high.

    THREADS
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  3. #273
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    ew

    Beijing woman finds feathers in her McDonald’s chicken wings
    So, you're telling us that those things are actually made of chicken!?
    by Alex Linder April 25, 2019 in News



    A woman is not exactly lovin’ it after her delivery order of chicken wings from a Beijing McDonald’s arrived with a few extra ingredients.

    When the woman’s daughter bit into one of the wings, she got choked up by a mouthful of feathers. After the woman went to the restaurant raised a fuss, the shop offered to pay her 10 times the price of the chicken wings plus an additional 300 yuan ($45) in cash or coupons, according to a Btime.com report.

    However, the woman refused the offer, instead reporting the case to the local food and drug administration. Meanwhile, McDonald’s has apologized publicly on Weibo, announcing that they are looking into the matter.

    Some Chinese netizens have expressed skepticism over the finding while others have voiced their amazement that it appears to indicate that McDonald’s chicken wings are actually made of real chicken.
    Still might not have been chicken. Could be pigeon or seagull.
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  4. #274
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    Impossible Whopper

    I should try this. I've had Impossible Burgers before but it's been years since I've had a whopper. I actually gave up BK a few years before I gave up eating beef because it started giving me the runs after. Like immediately after. Like dash to the bathroom immediately. After a few episodes, I stopped eating there (but I was still eating beef at other fast food places).

    Burger King is rolling out meatless Impossible Whoppers nationwide
    Plant-based patties are coming to a BK near you
    By Dami Lee@dami_lee Apr 29, 2019, 12:39pm EDT


    Photo Illustration by Michael Thomas/Getty Images

    Burger King is rolling out the Impossible Whopper nationwide, after a successful trial run testing the meatless burger in St. Louis. The chain announced in a statement today that it plans to test in more markets before distributing the burger nationally by the end of this year.

    The Impossible Whopper is made with startup Impossible Foods’ plant-based patties, which are designed to look and taste like meat. The patties are also designed to “bleed,” just like the real thing, which can be attributed to the use of heme, a soy-based compound found in plants and meat. The burgers have 15 percent less fat and 90 percent less cholesterol than regular Whoppers, and Burger King’s taste test experiments claim that customers and employees can’t tell the difference.

    Meatless options are gaining popularity at more fast food restaurants. White Castle offers Impossible Burgers, which uses another meat-free patty recipe from Impossible Foods, and Carl’s Jr. sells a veggie burger made by Beyond Meat, a competitor to Impossible Foods.
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  5. #275
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    There's gotta be lawsuit potential here...

    Brooklyn Burger King Delivered Beef Whoppers to Customers Expecting ‘Impossible’
    One vegetarian ate two before realizing he wasn’t eating the popular fake meat, which won’t hit NYC outposts until later this year
    by Eater Staff Jun 6, 2019, 8:47am EDT


    The Impossible Whopper Impossible Foods [Official]

    A Brooklyn location of the fast food chain Burger King has been advertising that it sells the meat-free Impossible Whopper on Seamless — but instead sends customers regular old beef Whoppers without telling them. At least one vegetarian customer didn’t realize until after he’d already eaten two Whoppers, simply believing the ads boasting the two burgers taste the same.

    For at least the last few weeks, the 736 Broadway franchise of the burger chain featured the Impossible Whopper — “100% WHOPPER, 0% Beef” — on its menu, at one point listing it as its most popular item. But serving the burger here is actually impossible, since it’s only available in select cities. A 35-year-old Williamsburg resident, who asked to go unnamed to shield his eating habits, says he only found out when he went into the actual store at a later point to order the burger and was told they don’t sell it.

    “I was incredulous,” he says. “It’s maybe 20 percent poisoning. This is a city where there are a lot of reasons why people don’t eat [meat], from religion to health to ethics.”

    A manager at the Burger King tells Eater that when a customer orders it, they’ve been sending a classic beef Whopper in its place, asking the driver to inform people of the swap. But drivers have not told multiple customers who ordered the Impossible Whopper that it actually contained real meat, the customers tell Eater. The receipt on the bag also says “Impossible Whopper,” which led the Williamsburg man to believe it truly did contain the trendy plant product.


    The Burger King’s Seamless page advertising the Impossible Whopper

    The restaurant’s Seamless page removed the Impossible Whopper some time on Tuesday afternoon, after Eater sent an inquiry to Burger King corporate and to Grubhub, the Seamless parent company. A Burger King spokesperson chalked it up to a “technology error” from a franchisee.

    Other NYC locations of Burger King on Seamless did not list the Impossible Whopper; Burger King, Grubhub, and the franchise would not clarify how only one location had the error.

    “We apologize for any confusion this has caused. Any guests who ordered an Impossible Whopper through delivery in the New York area and have any questions may call 1-866-394-2493,” the Burger King statement says.

    It’s not known how many people ordered the Impossible Whopper; Burger King did not say. The item — which was listed at the top of the restaurant’s page — had been up since at least May 20.

    The Williamsburg customer had eaten Impossible product before at a different restaurant and thought it tasted “80 percent” like a true beef burger; when he tried the Whoppers, he thought the same thing.

    “Nope,” he says. “The Whopper is just ****tier than I remember.”

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  6. #276
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    The Marrot



    I realize this is one of those neurotic reaction things like Straight Pride or White Pride, and that it's a parody publicity stunt from Arby's, but if you're going to really make fake vegetables out of meat, they should attempt to taste like the vegetable. Plus it's cheating to use the actual vegetable as part of the ingredients. That's like dipping an impossible burger in meat drippings.
    This marrot will just taste like turkey dipped in carrots.

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  7. #277
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    Feast of Legends: A Tabletop RPG presented by Wendy’s

    Gene Ching
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  8. #278
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    the P.L.T.

    McDonald's Plant-Based Burger Trial Isn't a Slam Dunk, Analyst Suggests
    The P.L.T. has "not been a blowout success thus far," an analyst says. What does that mean for the future of plant-based burgers at McDonald's?
    By Mike Pomranz October 31, 2019


    MCDONALD'S

    Plant-based meats are arguably the biggest trend in fast food. And McDonald's is inarguably America's largest burger chain. So needless to say, the big question on many pundits' mind has been when is Ronald going to start selling a plant-based burger? It's a question that intensified this year when Burger King took its Impossible Whopper nationwide.

    Last month, McDonald's partnered with Impossible Foods' top rival, Beyond Meat, to begin a test run of a new plant-based burger called the P.L.T. But short of letting any U.S. customers try it, the company instead trialed the burger at 28 locations around Ontario, Canada. Perhaps testing a Beyond Burger in America would have created too much hoopla, and Canada, while not quite as far away as Finland, where McDonald's launched a different fake meat burger, is a bit of a buffer from the U.S. Or, then again, maybe McDonald's has no deadset intention of ever bringing this burger to the U.S. Though, since McDonald's and Beyond Meat are both American companies, that's kind of hard to swallow.

    Regardless, whatever McDonald's is planning with plant-based meat, a hiccup has apparently occurred: Yesterday, MarketWatch reported that sales of the P.L.T. aren't as strong as analysts had hoped. "A key question is whether McDonald's will partner with Beyond Meat in the U.S.," a Bernstein analyst was quoted as noting earlier this week. "Based on our channel checks with select McDonald's based in Ontario, Canada that are currently testing the Beyond P.L.T. burger, the initial feedback has been largely positive, although it seems that the trial has not been a blowout success thus far that justifies an immediate nationwide rollout across both Canada and the U.S."

    Of course, not "a blowout success thus far" certainly isn't a failure. One could argue that blowout successes like KFC's meatless fried chicken test in one single location only did so well simply because of a confluence of publicity and scarcity, and doesn't correlate to national demand. And we shouldn't rush past the "feedback has been largely positive" part either. Still, part of the appeal of plant-based options is the excitement that surrounds them: Avoiding a lukewarm rollout is likely one of the reasons McDonald's has been slow to jump into the plant-based business to begin with. If that's the case, this talk sounds like a bad omen.

    And yet, maybe this is just Canada being Canada. In July, the Canadian chain Tim Hortons added Beyond Meat items to its menus only to axe them by September. Meanwhile, in the U.S., Dunkin' also trialed a Beyond Meat breakfast sandwich in July and has just announced it is taking it nationwide. It could just be that Americans are more interested in plant-based beef than our neighbors to the north.

    I reached out to McDonald's for a reaction to MarketWatch's report and received a reply from CEO Steve Easterbrook via an emailed statement cautioning that the trial was still in its early days. Easterbrook also indicated that while the Ontario rollout is indeed a limited run, it's less about timidity to enter the plant-based market and more about literally testing how the P.L.T. would be implemented while getting a read on the "flexitarian customer."

    "We want to get the taste right, we want to get the marketing right, we want to get the operations right," he said. "So there's a number of important factors that we are learning quickly, and we think Ontario is a great spot, because it will give us a good read across North America frankly, but also into the developed markets in Europe as well [...] we think the read across will be beneficial and help us speed up our intelligence on this. So, more to come clearly, but it's an area of interest for sure."

    Despite being the most successful fast food restaurant on the planet, McDonald's has a history of adding products people don't want. (I'm old enough to remember the Arch Deluxe!) So today's McDonald's may be warier of a big plant-based burger rollout than its competitors. And though the company is a late entry into the fake meat market, its commitment to the test phase means we're probably less likely to see a quick Dunkin'-style turnaround and a more measured rollout. If the Canada trial does turn out to be a bust, McDonald's plant-based burger timeline might get even slower. Either way, it seems the "when will McDonald's add a plant-based burger?" questions won't be going away any time soon.

    UPDATE: Oct. 31, 2019: This article has been updated with a response provided by McDonald's.
    I tried an Impossible Whopper. I figured I should support this movement. I was all excited because I haven't had a whopper in like a decade plus. But man, they're still nasty. I remember when I used to eat beef that I had to give up on BK because it gave me the runs afterwards. The Impossible Whopper didn't affect me that way, but I felt like I ate too much salt and too much grease for the rest of the day.

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  9. #279
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    Kung Fu Donkey restaurants

    Fat Wang's Donkey Burgers sounds like a horrible porn flick.


    Chinese food has conquered the world. But are we ready for the donkey burger?

    Ben Westcott and Nanlin Fang, CNN • Updated 21st November 2019


    Donkey meat chain Fat Wang's signature dish -- a donkey burger with sauce and spring onions.

    Beijing (CNN) — From steamed dumplings to hot pot, traditional Chinese food has often proved hugely popular in the West. Now, Chinese restaurant owners are hoping they have found the next delicacy to crack the Western market -- donkey burgers.
    In Beijing, the unusual dish is undeniably popular.
    At lunch hour, diners pour into the brightly colored "Fat Wang's Donkey Burger" restaurant in the busy Beijing central district of Xicheng.
    Sitting at a counter with a group of friends, Beijing local Wang Li Min is tucking into the restaurant chain's signature donkey burger, which comes in a long, thin bun with spring onions.
    "In China, we have a saying," Wang says, between bites. "In heaven, there is dragon meat. On Earth, there is donkey meat."
    The meat tastes gamey and full of flavor, more like beef than chicken or pork.
    Originally a northern Chinese delicacy from Hebei province, the donkey-based snack has spread to major cities across the country. There are more than 20 Fat Wang's branches in Beijing alone.
    Just how popular donkey burgers are across the whole of China is debated. According to Sun Yu Jiang, a professor at the Qingdao Agricultural University, heavy demand is only really isolated to a few big provinces such as Hebei or Xinjiang.
    "Donkey meat is not the mainstream product of meat consumption," he says. "Most people in China are more likely to eat pigs, poultry, cattle and sheep."


    Donkeys, horses and mules are gathered for sale at a livestock trading market in Faku, northeastern China's Liaoning province on April 11, 2016.
    STR/AFP via Getty Images

    But Zhang Haitao, the official Hebei government-sanctioned representative of the donkey burger and founder of the Kung Fu Donkey restaurant chain, says demand is growing faster than supply. He even thinks it could go global.
    "When I was the president of the Hejian Donkey Burger Association (earlier this year), the market value of the donkey burger business was about 8 billion yuan per year," he says. That's around $1.1 billion.
    "But if the donkey meat market can improve, the industry's market value could be at least 100 billion yuan in the future," he adds.

    Emperors and trains
    There are different stories about how donkey meat became a popular delicacy in northern China.
    Wang Haibo, regional head of the Fat Wang's chain and nephew of the eponymous founder, says the legend of donkey meat goes back to the 1700s during the reign of the Qing dynasty's Qianlong Emperor.
    "When the emperor was traveling south, he stopped at Hejian Fang in Hebei province. He felt hungry at night and asked a eunuch if there was anything he could eat. The woman at the house he stayed at made him a pancake. Coincidentally, they had just killed a donkey and stewed its meat, so she put them together and gave it to the emperor," Wang says.


    Wang Haibo, regional head of Fat Wang's Donkey Burgers, with a sample of the store's signature products in Beijing in September.
    Ben Westcott/CNN

    According to Wang, the emperor was so impressed by his meal that he brought the recipe back to Beijing, from where it spread across the country.
    Another explanation is that Hebei province's many donkeys, previously used for freight transport, fell into disuse after the introduction of railways towards the end of the Qing Dynasty. No longer needing them for transport, locals found another use for their donkeys.
    But the government-sponsored expert, Zhang, says the story is very simple. Shortly after the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, farmers began to use donkey meat as food when they traveled for work.
    "Donkey meat was cheapest at that time. The donkey burger can be stored for several days before it gets sour," he says. Over time, according to Zhang, it spread to other nearby provinces and cities
    Whatever the reason, the dish has now become a major part of northeastern Chinese cuisine and is increasingly being used to attract tourists.
    Hebei province even hosted its first annual donkey burger festival in May 2017.
    "The demand for donkey is growing, but the market has shifted in recent years. It was a low-end market before, and now it has become a middle or high-end market," Zhang says.
    However, there are indications that instead of growing, the donkey meat market in China is actually shrinking.
    According to official Chinese government data, the number of donkeys being kept as livestock shrank almost 50% over the past 10 years to 2.53 million in 2018. In comparison, before the recent swine fever crisis, China had more than 420 million pigs.
    Qingdao professor Sun says the drop was probably partly due to the growing industrialization of transportation and agriculture. Also, raising donkeys is expensive and time-consuming.

    Fast food sensation?
    Originally from Hebei, Fat Wang's is one of China's largest donkey meat restaurant chains. Apart from their signature donkey burgers, they also are known for donkey meat hotpots.
    Regional head Wang is very particular about how to handle donkey meat. "It has to be from donkeys that are older than three years. If they are too young, the meat will be too soft to eat. If the meat is frozen it won't taste good," he says.
    Wang explains that it is their family's recipe for donkey burgers they use to this day. And now they want to share it with the world.
    "I am thinking about expanding outside of China," Wang says. "It's just that so far our management team can't follow the speed of expansion (domestically) ... But I think we can expand this to the Western world."


    One of about 20 outlets of the popular donkey meat chain Fat Wang's Donkey Burgers across Beijing.
    CNN/Ben Westcott

    Kung Fu Donkey's Zhang says there are already several people looking into opening branches overseas.
    "It has been called a model for 'Chinese fast food' ... The cooking procedure of donkey burger can be standardized like the hamburgers of McDonald's and KFC," he says, adding that he'd like to emulate the success of hot pot sensation Haidilao, which has hundreds of branches around the world.
    They might be fighting an uphill battle. A donkey burger restaurant which opened with much fanfare in the Australian city of Sydney in 2018 appears to have already closed permanently.
    Wang says he's relying on Chinese Americans to spread the word about the great taste of donkey meat and create a market for it in the United States.
    Whoever gets there first, Wang says he's happy to wait as he's not worried about his competition.
    "Their burgers will never taste like ours," he says.

    CNN's Maisy Mok and Yong Xiong contributed to this article.
    THREADS
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  10. #280
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    wth prc?

    McDonald’s China Releases Limited-Time Spam Oreo Burger
    BY BRYAN KE
    DECEMBER 21, 2020
    2 MINUTE READ

    McDonald’s China has released a limited-time Spam Oreo burger for the holidays.

    Although it sounds like an early April Fools’ joke, the company first teased the existence of the new Spam Oreo burger on Dec. 15 on Weibo, according to Delish.


    Image screenshot via Weibo
    The Spam Oreo burger will be available starting Dec. 21 for 13.14 Chinese yuan ($2). McDonald’s China will only make 400,000 of the burgers. The sandwich will come with two slices of Spam slathered with mayo and drizzled with Oreo crumbs.

    I can't even make those flavors go together in my head. Sounds like a stoner munchy fix.
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  11. #281
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    BTS meals?

    I can't even...

    BTS and McDonald’s Collab Brings New South Korean-Inspired Sauces to ARMY in 50 Countries

    BY KIMBERLY NGUYEN
    APRIL 19, 2021
    2 MINUTE READ

    The BTS ARMY has something new to look forward to next month as the South Korean supergroup collaborates with McDonald’s on a signature order.

    The BTS-approved meal will include a 10-piece Chicken McNuggets, medium fries and a medium Coke, according to a press release.

    The meal, available on May 26, will also come with two new sauces inspired by the menu found at McDonald’s branches in South Korea: sweet chili and cajun.

    The South Korean boy band shared great experiences with the fast-food company, their label BIGHIT MUSIC shared.

    “We’re excited about this collaboration and can’t wait to share the BTS Meal with the world,” the label said.

    The BTS meal follows McDonald’s previous partnerships with Travis Scott and J Balvin last year, as part of the fast-food chain’s Famous Orders program. It is the first celebrity collaboration from the program to become available in nearly 50 countries.

    “BTS truly lights up the world stage, uniting people across the globe through their music. We’re excited to bring customers even closer to their beloved band in a way only McDonald’s can – through our delicious food – when we introduce the BTS signature order on our menu next month,” McDonald’s USA CMO Morgan Flatley said.

    Last month the seven-member group, which was named Time Magazine “Entertainer of the Year” in 2020, released a statement on social media, condemning anti-Asian hate.

    “We recall moments when we faced discrimination as Asians,” they wrote. “We have endured expletives without reason and were mocked for the way we look.”

    “We stand against racial discrimination. We condemn violence. You, I and we all have the right to be respected. We will stand together.”

    Feature Images via Getty
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  12. #282
    I really like McDonald's Cheeseburger. One of my favorite food to buy in a fast-food chain.

  13. #283
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    The Big Mac index

    fascinating...

    November 30, 2021
    The Big Mac Index in 2021

    Entertaining
    Who hasn't tried or at least heard of a famous Big Mac at McDonald's fast-food restaurants? However, few people know that it gave rise to the so-called Big Mac Index, which compares the value of currencies of different countries.


    The Big Mac Index in 2021
    Olga Protska Senior Content Writer & 2D Artist



    What is the Big Mac Index?

    The Big Mac Index is the price of the burger in various countries that are converted to one currency (such as the US dollar) and used to measure purchasing power parity.

    It all started in 1986 when The Economist magazine decided to estimate the currencies' value by country based on the prices of Big Mac at McDonald's fast-food restaurants.

    Thus, The Economist introduced a simple indicator of the fundamental value of currencies globally.

    What does the Big Mac Index show, and why exactly was it taken as an indicator?

    It's pretty simple. Big Mac is the most well-known product in McDonald's' fast-food chain. Besides, the same ingredients are used for Big Mac in any country: meat, bread, cheese, lettuce, onions, etc. Therefore, The Economist experts use Big Mac alone instead of determining the cost of a consumer basket (more complex method) for each country.

    Big Mac Index Table as of Q3 2021

    The most relevant Big Mac Index so far (as of July 2021) is presented in the table below.



    Let's analyze these data a bit.

    The Lebanese pound exchange rate expressed in the Big Mac Index in July 2021 is 6548.67 pounds per dollar.

    Considering that the current market rate of the Lebanese currency is about 22000 pounds, rather than 6548.67 per US dollar, the pound is undervalued by approximately 70.20%.

    Thus, the Lebanese pound is the world’s most undervalued (cheapest) currency according to the Big Mac Index.

    In 2019, the Russian ruble was the most undervalued (by 64.5%) currency worldwide.

    Now, Big Mac costs $2.19 in Russia. While the price of the burger in the United States is $5.65, the Russian currency exchange rate is 29.91 ruble per dollar in terms of the Big Mac Index.

    However, the ruble is cheaper in Forex – about 74.53 rubles per US dollar (as of July 2021). Therefore, we can conclude that the market undervalues the Russian currency by almost 59.90%.

    In the list of the world’s most undervalued currencies, the Russian ruble and the Lebanese pound are accompanied by the South African rand (undervalued by 59.60%), Azerbaijani manat (undervalued by 58.90%), and the Turkish lira (undervalued by 58.70%). Notably, the currencies of India, Pakistan, the Philippines, and other low-income countries are not in the top five most undervalued currencies in 2021.


    As for the most highly valued currencies, the statistics by countries show that the world’s most overvalued (expensive) currency is the Venezuelan bolívar.
    As of July 2021, the Big Mac costs 30,164,100 bolívares in Venezuela or $8.35, making it the most expensive Big Mac in the world. The exchange rate based on the Big Mac Index is supposed to be 5,338,778.76 bolívares per US dollar. Although, the actual VEF/USD rate is approximately 3,613,989.07, making this currency overvalued by 47.70%.

    Switzerland, Norway, and Sweden accompany Venezuela as the most overvalued currencies based on the Big Mac Index.

    According to the Big Mac Index authors, Euro is also undervalued by the market. The average Big Mac price in the Eurozone is $5.03, meaning the currency is undervalued by 11.10%.

    Notably, according to the Big Mac Index, all major currency pairs, except the Swiss franc, Swedish krona, and Norwegian krone, are undervalued against the US dollar.

    Can We Use This Knowledge in Trading?

    We can hardly do it in the short and medium terms, but the Big Mac Index can serve as a helpful assistant while long-term trading.

    For example, it can be used as a filter when opening positions in the Forex market. After all, if the Japanese yen is significantly oversold against the US dollar, traders should refrain from opening long positions on USD/JPY.

    We can draw similar conclusions for other Forex currency pairs.

    The key thing to remember is that the Big Mac Index is an accurate indicator of the fundamental value of currencies, and traders can benefit from its use in trading.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #284
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    How to say 'want fries with that?' in Japanese?


    McDonald’s rations fries in Japan due to potato shortage

    Covid-19 and floods in Canada force fast-food company to sell only small-sized fries


    McDonald's fries will be rationed in Japan from Friday Photograph: Alexander Shcherbak/TASS
    Guardian staff and agencies
    Tue 21 Dec 2021 22.29 EST

    A new kind of chip shortage has hit Japanese supply chains, with McDonald’s forced to ration fries as Covid-19 and floods in Canada squeeze potato imports.

    McDonald’s Japan said it would only sell small-sized french fries for a week from Friday to avoid shortages. “Due to large-scale flooding near the Port of Vancouver … and the global supply chain crunch caused by the coronavirus pandemic, there are delays in the supply of potatoes.”

    A McDonald’s sign.
    McDonald’s runs out of milkshakes amid ‘supply chain issues’
    Read more
    The company said it had taken the measure to ensure that customers could still order fries, even though the “stable procurement of resource materials” was proving difficult.

    The chain suffered a similar issue in December 2014, due to a labour dispute taking place on the other side of the Pacific.

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    More than 3,000 McDonald’s restaurants in Japan – the biggest Asian market for US frozen potato products – said they would sell only small-sized portions of fries for the foreseeable future amid a protracted dispute between 20,000 dockworkers and terminal operators and shipping lines at 29 ports on the US west coast.

    In response McDonald’s Japan took the emergency step of importing 1,000 tonnes of frozen fries by air.

    The most recent restriction comes during the busy year-end period with schools and offices beginning to close for the holidays.

    It will also be in place on Christmas Day – commonly celebrated in Japan with a hearty serving of another US fast-food, KFC, which is heavily marketed around the festive period.

    Meanwhile, a pandemic-fuelled global microchip shortage continues to plague carmakers including Japan’s Toyota, which has announced production cuts due to the crisis and supply chain problems in south-east Asia.

    With Agence France-Presse
    KFC for xmas? WTF?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #285
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    McPlant


    McDONALD’S UK&I IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THE NEW McPLANT IS OFFICIALLY…EVERYWHERE! 🍔 🌱

    Following a successful trial, McDonald’s will be rolling out its first ever plant-based burger to EVERY restaurant across the UK and Ireland from Wednesday 5th January

    McPlant, which features a patty co-developed with Beyond Meat®, is McDonald’s first plant-based burger option

    To celebrate its release, famous faces including Rosie Ramsey, Simon Gregson and Lawrence Okolie gave McPlant their seal of approval with tastings all across the UK
    McDonald’s is proud to announce the national roll-out of its plant-based offering, the McPlant, to all restaurants across the UK and Ireland from Wednesday 5th January 2022, following a successful trial at over 250 restaurants last year.
    The impressive McPlant, which took over three years to develop, features a patty co-developed with Beyond Meat® and has already proved hugely successful with McDonald’s customers.

    From today, it will be available from Inverness to Liverpool and Penzance to Grimsby, meaning the McPlant is officially everywhere for burgers lovers to get their hands-on. Whether they’re plant-based, taking part in Veganuary or a true meat lover – McDonald’s is confident it’s a burger for everyone.
    To celebrate the fact #McPlantIsEverywhere, McDonald’s took celebrities to all corners of the country to sample the latest addition to the menu. From Rosie Ramsey celebrating its arrival in the North East on the remote Northumberland shoreline to Corrie legend Simon Gregson swapping the Bushtucker Trials for a McPlant in Manchester city centre.
    Michelle Graham-Clare, Chief Marketing Officer, McDonald’s UK and Ireland said: “We’re so pleased that our McPlant is now officially ‘everywhere’ and available for more of our customers to taste and enjoy. We saw a remarkable response to the trial period back in October and now McPlant is on the high-street, in retail parks and service stations all over the UK and Ireland so all of our customers will be able to try it. We’re proud to once again be offering our customers more great-tasting options from McDonald’s. Its our same iconic taste – but plant-based.”
    McDonald’s UK&I spent three years on research and development to bring a delicious plant-based offering to British and Irish customers, and every element of the McPlant was designed with taste and quality top-of-mind. From the plant-based patty co-developed with Beyond Meat, to innovative vegan cheese based on pea protein that tastes just like McDonald’s iconic cheese slices, and a new vegan sandwich sauce.
    The impressive McPlant features a Vegan Sesame Bun, Mustard, Ketchup, Vegan Sauce, Fresh Onion, Pickles, Lettuce, Tomato and Vegan Cheese. It is cooked separately from other McDonald’s burgers and sandwiches using dedicated utensils.
    For more information please visit McDonalds.co.uk/McPlant

    About Beyond Meat
    Beyond Meat, Inc. (NASDAQ:BYND), a leader in plant-based meat, offers a portfolio of revolutionary plant-based meats. Founded in 2009, Beyond Meat products are designed to have the same taste and texture as animal-based meat while offering certain environmental benefits. Beyond Meat’s brand commitment, Eat What You Love™, represents a strong belief that there is a better way to feed our future and that the positive choices we all make, no matter how small, can help us move towards the kind of future we want. By shifting from animal-based meat to plant-based meat, we can help address concerns related to resource conservation and animal welfare. As of September 2021, Beyond Meat had products available at approximately 128,000 retail and foodservice outlets in over 85 countries worldwide. Visit www.BeyondMeat.com and follow @BeyondMeatEU on Instagram, @BeyondMeat on Facebook, Twitter and TikTok.
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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