Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 91 to 102 of 102

Thread: Fallon Fox

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Canada!
    Posts
    23,101
    Consistent training using a method that gets the results desired is more important than other factors in my opinion. Even for someone who has Gender Identity disorder. Train hard, kick arse. Pretty simple, trans or not. oh, and you only get to be king or queen for a day. then, it all goes to another.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Fox vs. Rousey

    Coincidentally, I was just wondering what's been up with Fallon Fox lately.
    Rousey won't fight transgendered MMAer Fallon Fox
    Calls out women's champ in aftermath of TMZ interview
    QMI AGENCY
    First posted: Friday, September 19, 2014 07:00 PM EDT | Updated: Friday, September 19, 2014 07:24 PM EDT


    Fallon Fox A photo of transgendered MMAer Fallon Fox. (Facebook)

    Even Ronda Rousey has a line she won’t cross.

    She “ain’t scared” of transgendered MMA fighter Fallon Fox, but that doesn’t mean she’s going to meet her in the octagon.

    Rousey, the UFC’s women’s bantamweight champ, is unbeaten in 10 professional fights.

    And while she told TMZ this week she can “knockout anyone in the world,” there’s a reason she’s shying away from a potential bout with Fox, a 38-year-old who once served in the U.S. Navy as a man.

    “It’s a case by case scenario thing,” Rousey said of her transgendered challenger. “I’ve tried to research it a lot. I feel like if you go through puberty as a man it’s not something you can reverse ... There’s no undo button on that.”

    Ronda Rousey -- Fallon Fox Has Unfair Advantage ... But I'd Still Beat Her Ass! - Watch More Celebrity Videos or Subscribe

    Unsurprisingly, Fox says it shouldn’t matter.

    She took to social media to implore Rousey and the Ultimate Fighting Championship to give her a title shot.

    “I really wish Ronda would stop with the ridiculous bone structure arguments,” Fox posted to her official Facebook page. “That was so last year. Second, she should tell her boss to put me in that octagon over there at UFC.

    “I'm quite sure that there are quite a few female MMA fighters who have guts to fight another skilled woman without peeing their panties.”

    Despite the rhetoric, it might not be Rousey’s choice anyway.

    Her boss, UFC president Dana White, took a pretty strong stance on the matter in an interview with reporters last year.

    “Bone structure is different, hands are bigger, jaw is bigger, everything is bigger,” White said. “I don’t believe in it. I don’t think someone who used to be a man and became a woman should be able to fight a woman.”

    Meanwhile, Rousey has demolished everyone who has stood in her way.

    Her last bout, against Canadian challenger Alexis Davis, lasted 16 seconds.

    “In Fallon Fox’s case, I think she has an unfair advantage,” Rousey said. “It’s unfortunate for her competition as well.”
    I'm very tempted to split Fallon off on to her own independent thread.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Ouch


    'I’ve fought a lot of women and have never felt the strength that I felt in a fight as I did that night,' said Tamikka Brents about Fallon Fox (pictured) Youtube screenshot
    Dustin Siggins

    Fri Sep 19, 2014 - 5:42 pm EST
    Transgender ‘female’ MMA fighter gives female opponent concussion, broken eye socket

    Transgender mixed martial arts (MMA) competitor Fallon Fox is facing new criticisms after breaking the eye socket of his last opponent.

    On Saturday, Fox defeated Tamikka Brents by TKO at 2:17 of the first round of their match. In addition to the damaged orbital bone that required seven staples, Brents received a concussion. In a post-fight interview this week, she told Whoa TV that "I've never felt so overpowered ever in my life."

    “I’ve fought a lot of women and have never felt the strength that I felt in a fight as I did that night. I can’t answer whether it’s because [he] was born a man or not, because I’m not a doctor,” she stated. “I can only say, I’ve never felt so overpowered ever in my life, and I am an abnormally strong female in my own right. ”

    His “grip was different,” she added. “I could usually move around in the clinch against...females but couldn’t move at all in Fox’s clinch.”

    Fox's gender controversy is not new. In March 2013, after a 39-second knockout victory, it was revealed that Fox had not told the MMA community about his sex-change operation, which took place in 2006. That bout was the fifth straight first-round victory for the then-37-year old Fox, including his three amateur bouts, and his second victory as a professional fighter.

    A video of the Brents fight taken by a ringside fan shows Fox throwing several powerful knees to the face and torso of Brents at the start of the match, who pulled guard to protect herself. Soon, Brents turned her back to avoid damage, where she took approximately 45 seconds of elbow and fist strikes – many blocked by her hands and arms – before the referee stopped the fight.

    Critics of Fox abound, especially in light of the Brents fight. Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) female champ Ronda Rousey told TMZ that while she would fight Fox, allowing transgender men to fight is "a case-by-case scenario."

    "I feel like, if you already go through puberty as a man, that's something you can't really reverse," said Rousey, who said that it "would be fine" if a boy who was on hormone therapy to become a woman prior to puberty wanted to fight as a woman.

    Because Fox had transgender surgery so late in life, however, Rousey said that he shouldn't fight women.

    Likewise, last year, UFC announcer Joe Rogan made his opinion unambiguously and graphically clear, saying on his podcast that a transgendered man would "have all the bone structure that comes with” being a man. “You have bigger hands, you have bigger shoulder joints."

    Speaking to LifeSiteNews, military veteran Jeff Nader, who has fought for UFC competitor Bellator, said that “Fallon Fox has had the benefits of being a man for most of his life. [He has] bone density, muscle mass, and other physical benefits that one gets from being a man. You can't have that, and then make a minor adjustment -- basically, a cosmetic adjustment -- and suddenly claim to be a woman."

    "Nothing can take away from the fact that you are physically a man. Mentally and emotionally, who knows -- but physically, he's a man."

    Nader said that Fox's loss to a woman earlier this year "doesn't matter." He told LifeSiteNews that "I am 220 pounds right now, and there are some women who would beat me in a grappling match because they have better technique. But that's in grappling, which doesn't involve striking. My wife has beaten several men in regulated grappling matches, but when you involve striking, that changes the equation. The physicality involved in MMA, including brute strength, changes the equation."

    Combat sambo practitioner and former amateur boxer Brian Ledoux was likewise critical of Fox's decision to compete, saying that "I do not think a transgender male should be able to fight in female sports. I consider myself to be socially liberal on most subjects, but not when it comes to this scenario."

    "In my opinion, when it comes to something like combat sports there is a clear physical advantage a transgender male could have over a female fighter. This is coming from my basic understanding of the physiological difference between the sexes,” Ledoux said. “These advantages create an uneven playing field in a sport that is already dealing with things like PED abuse, blood doping, etc."

    "While I respect an individual’s rights to live their own life," Ledoux told LifeSiteNews, "I think in the case of MMA and combat sports a clear line should be drawn."

    Former professional MMA fighter Dennis "Old School" Siggins told LifeSiteNews that "I totally disagree" with Fox fighting."

    "Even if a transgender male loses some of his physical strength, that person will still likely have a tremendous strength advantage over...female opponents," said Siggins, who in addition to fighting also formerly ran and reported for the biggest MMA website in New England and New York. "A transgender male is simply bigger and more powerful than a female, and should not, I believe, be allowed to compete in female combat sports."

    Fox has received support from some quarters, including from the first openly ****sexual UFC fighter, Liz Carmouche. After Fox's surgery became public, Carmouche told the ****sexual advocacy site GLAAD that "the MMA community – people who work in the gyms, the trainers and sparring partners and the fans – all openly embraced me as an athlete and I’m proud to see that also happening with a transgender athlete."

    Carmouche said, “If a world-regarded respected body like the Nevada Athletic Commission licenses her as a female competitor, and says she has no performance advantage, then that should be good enough for everyone."

    After Fox's past was revealed, Championship Fighting Alliance women’s tournament was canceled in support of Fox, who was under a great deal of pressure at the time because he had falsely claimed the California boxing commission had approved her fighting license. Fox says the misunderstanding -- Fox's application was being considered in California -- was accidental.

    In an interview with "Inside MMA," Fallon said that "I don’t believe that a transgender fighter should have to disclose her personal medical history to other female fighters before they fight. It’s simply for the reason the medical community and the scientific community have come to the consensus that post-operative transsexual fighters who have been on hormone-replacement therapy and testosterone suppression, when they’re going from male to female, haven’t been found to have any physiological advantages over other women.”

    Fox also said that some women who don't want to fight him may choose that path because they "might be a hate-filled person" or "have a bias." He said that "I don't want to fight those people, anyways, because they're scared.” He wants to fight someone who will fight "aggressively."

    One fighter who did try to be aggressive was Brents. Her conclusion is that Fox shouldn't fight with women. “Any other job or career I say have a go at it, but when it comes to a combat sport I think it just isn’t fair. At least not until we have more scientific proof that it is or isn’t fair. More research is needed for sure."

    Disclosure: Dennis Siggins is the father of LifeSiteNews D.C. Correspondent Dustin Siggins
    I changed this thread title from 'Transgender MMA' to 'Fallon Fox' because this is really just about her.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Great Lakes State, U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,647
    I think Fallon Fox should challenge Mike Tyson in drag to a match. "I'm onna 'bus you one". http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/h...Mike-Tyson.jpg
    Last edited by PalmStriker; 06-09-2015 at 08:49 PM.

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Game Face



    Game Face is coming to Netflix this month.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Hard in the wake of Orlando

    Transgender “Female” MMA Fighter Brutally Injures Female Opponent
    Cultureby Adam Campbell - Jun 8, 2015 278588


    Transgender mixed martial arts (MMA) fighter Fallon Fox is the target of criticism after brutally injuring an opponent.

    Fox defeated Tamikka Brents just two minutes into the first round of the match. Brents suffered a damaged orbital bone, which required seven staples, and a concussion.

    Brents summed it up: “I’ve never felt so overpowered ever in my life.”

    “I’ve fought a lot of women,” Brents stated. “And never felt the strength I felt in a fight as I did that night. I can’t answer whether it’s because [he] was born a man or not, because I’m not a doctor,” she stated. “I can only say, I’ve never felt so overpowered ever in my life, and I am an abnormally strong female in my own right.”

    The video of the Brents-Fox fight was pretty brutal: Fox threw knees to Brents face and torso right at the beginning, to kick off the fight. Brents ultimately turned her back to avoid more damage–and took almost a minute of hard strikes from Fox’s elbows and fists, before the referee stopped.

    Because of how men and women are differently built–Fox, who was born a man, has larger hands, shoulders, bones, and muscle mass–a transgender opponent has a huge advantage. Because Fox transitioned her gender so recently, she still has many of the advantages that being a man has.

    And, on Saturday night when Fox fought Brents, those advantages were very clearly on full display.

    Already, criticism is mounting, both from MMA fighters and the greater public at large. Mixed martial arts champ, Ronda Rousey, has refused to fight Fox over her “unfair advantage.”

    It remains to be seen if the latest fight, which left an opponent so severely injured, will affect the rules of MMA fighting. But for now, Fox remains classified as a female fighter–and ready to fight, with the advantage of being born a man.
    Perhaps this was just a matter of time...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Anne Veriato

    This is slightly OT, but we don't have a transgender thread here...yet?

    BJJ Brown Belt Transgender Woman Anne Veriato Defeats Man In Her Mixed Martial Arts Debut
    By Chris Zahar - March 11, 2018



    Last month, we wrote about Anne Veriato — the transgender woman who was planning on facing a man in her mixed martial arts debut.

    View image on Twitter

    Portal A Crítica

    @ACritica
    Mr. Cage 34 é palco de luta histórica com atleta transgênero neste sábado (10) em Manaus. Saiba mais: https://goo.gl/PdxNXz #CompartilheACrítica

    8:06 AM - Mar 10, 2018
    4
    See Portal A Crítica's other Tweets
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    Well, Anne faced that man, and she won.

    Veriato faced Railson Paixao in a strawweight bout at Mr. Cage 34, which took place in Manaus, Brazil.

    According to MMA Fighting, Veriato spent the majority of the fight working her submissions. This should come as no surprise considering her background in Brazilian jiu-jitsu. However, she also connected with good shots while standing.


    View image on Twitter

    Portal A Crítica

    @ACritica
    Atleta trans Anne Veriato vence luta histórica contra Raílson Paixão no Mr. Cage 34, em Manaus: https://goo.gl/3wnRjy

    6:08 AM - Mar 11, 2018
    45
    25 people are talking about this
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    She won the match via decision.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Atleta trans Anne Veriato vence luta histórica contra Raílson Paixão no Mr Cage 34

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Discussion of an old fight

    A very weak clip but this point resurfaces.

    Transgender MMA fighter breaks female opponent’s skull. Is it now OK for a man to hit a woman?
    'I've never felt so overpowered ever in my life...'
    Caldron Pool October 15, 2018



    In 2014, Fallon Fox, a transgender MMA fighter, beat his female opponent, Tamika Brents, so severely, that she suffered a broken skull and concussion before being TKO’d.

    The fight lasted one round and was over in almost two and a half minutes. It’s not easy viewing, but the entire fight, including the bloody end, can be viewed below:



    In an interview following the fight, Brents said:
    I’ve fought a lot of women and have never felt the strength that I felt in a fight as I did that night. I can’t answer whether it’s because she was born a man or not because I’m not a doctor. I can only say, I’ve never felt so overpowered ever in my life and I am an abnormally strong female in my own right… I still disagree with Fox fighting. Any other job or career I say have a go at it, but when it comes to a combat sport I think it just isn’t fair
    .

    Responding to this incident, Ashley McGuire, author of Sex Scandal: The Drive to Abolish Male and Female, said: “Twenty years ago, if a man hit a woman so hard that he sent her to the hospital, he’d be in prison. Now he can get paid for it.

    In the following video, McGuire explains, while the idea that gender is a personal choice might sound enlightened to some, it’s actually very anti-scientific and especially anti-women:
    That’s because the men-and-women-are-the-same argument invariably leads women to be judged against a male standard. Or, to put it another way, to be more of a woman, a woman has to be more like a man….

    For the tiny percentage of people who experience gender dysphoria, we should have nothing but compassion. We should do everything we can to help them and protect their dignity, but we don’t need to overturn biologically defined sex differences to do so.
    Men and women are inherently different, and women will pay an especially high price if we continue to pretend otherwise. The incident with Fox and Brents proves a man can break a woman’s skull in the name of progress, because everyone is too “politically correct” to break his heart with reality.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    South FL. Which is not to be confused with any part of the USA
    Posts
    9,297
    For the tiny percentage of people who experience gender dysphoria, we should have nothing but compassion. We should do everything we can to help them and protect their dignity, but we don’t need to overturn biologically defined sex differences to do so.
    that pretty much sums it up for me...in or out of the ring.
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

  11. #101
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Bravest athlete in history?

    Bravest trans perhaps. Personally I feel Tommie Smith and John Carlos were braver. But there are plenty of examples of bravery in sports. I'm imagine Fallon's critics will have a field day with this.

    Fallon Fox is still the bravest athlete in history
    Fallon Fox talks about the vicious online attacks she weathered, plus the support of the team in her corner.
    By Cyd Zeigler @CydZeigler Jan 14, 2020, 7:00am PST


    Fallon Fox is ready to step back into the ring.

    In 2013, when Fallon Fox came out publicly as trans in professional mixed martial arts, she was the target of a torrent of hatred I have literally never seen targeting an LGBTQ athlete. While certainly some writers took thoughtful approaches to understanding this emerging dynamic of trans athletes in women’s sports, still many more, like Joe Rogan, were vicious for the sake of being vicious.

    Yet Fox stood strong and continued to push for, and earn, her right to compete. Except for one fateful match, she also won every time she stepped into the professional ring.

    When I wrote my book, Fair Play: How LGBT Athletes Are Claiming Their Rightful Place In Sports, the final chapter was titled, “Fallon Fox Is The Bravest Athlete In History.”

    That remains true for me now, four years later.

    So when Outsports released its 20 LGBTQ sports heroes of the decade, and we erroneously failed to include Fox on that original list, I felt it was important to re-introduce Fox to the world.

    Today, as she works toward getting a degree, Fox is quietly re-emerging on the scene. She had slipped away from the public eye and social media for some time as she nursed injuries and healed her body. Now .she’s stepping back in the ring in hopes of some sparring and possible exhibition matches.

    “My body is feeling a lot better lately,” she told me from her home in Chicago. “I’m getting past some of my injuries and I’m feeling a lot more in shape.”

    Fox’s previous departure from MMA

    When Fox disappeared from professional MMA, some people wondered why. Did a lack of opportunity with the UFC drive her away? Would no one fight her? While she admits some women likely felt pressure to not validate Fox’s presence in the sport with a fight, she said it was exclusively injuries that forced her to the sideline.

    “I would have kept going but the injuries were the biggest reason,” she said, insisting that there were many women willing to fight her. “Some people suspected it was the UFC not letting me in, but that wasn’t the ultimate goal. Some people would ask if I wanted to fight in the UFC, and yeah, I would have taken that opportunity. But even without that I would have just kept fighting.”

    To be sure, it wasn’t just UFC that seemed closed to having Fox enter the octagon against a cisgender woman. Fox told Outsports that she specifically approached Invicta, an all-female MMA promotion, about competing. She said she had personal conversations with executives there, yet follow-up outreach from Fox went unreturned.

    Even with high-level MMA promotions ignoring her, MMA writers attacking her existence in the sport, and comments on MMA blogs that were routinely banned as hate speech, Fox persisted.

    “What drove me to want to stay in the sport was my whole goal for becoming an MMA fighter, and that was to be like my heroes, some of the cisgender women in MMA I watched from 2006 on. That’s where I belonged. That’s who I was, and I wasn’t going to let anyone stop me from being that.”

    One of the lasting moments from Fox’s career is a fight that has been twisted by anti-trans forces to paint her as a criminal assailant. During her fight against Tamikka Brents, Brents suffered a broken orbital and a concussion. Broken bones and concussions are not uncommon in MMA.

    The people looking to ban trans women from women’s sports quickly twisted that into the misleading headline: Transgender MMA Fighter Breaks Skull of Her Female Opponent. The crux of their campaign is to build an aura of rarity around the fight and point to Fox being trans as the reason for the outcome.

    “This happens all the time,” Fox said. “I’m not the first female MMA fighter who’s broken another fighter’s bones or caused a large amount of stitches or a concussion or any combination of those. And people will of course, because I’m trans, hold it up as this devastating thing that couldn’t possibly happen if I weren’t trans. But there are many different examples of similar things happening.”

    A team in her corner

    While people outside Fox’s circle have used the most malicious terms known in the English language in an attempt to drive her from the sport, Fox said she was supported by the people in MMA who knew her best.

    “I know what it’s like to compete and train with teammates and they not know you’re trans. They get o know you as a woman and nothing else. And then later on when you come out, your team is behind you because they understand the situation and they’ve seen it first-hand and they care about you. In many situations this is happening with other trans women.”

    Fox points out that she had been with her training team for a long time before she came out publicly, or came out to them, as trans. All the while they had, according to Fox, absolutely no idea that she was any different from any cisgender athlete in MMA.

    Despite all of the screams of “unfair advantages” lobbied at her and other trans women in women’s sports, the women sparring with her saw no reason to believe she was different.

    ”My teammates had no idea I was trans. They recognized my endurance, my strength, my ability to cut weight in the same category as cisgender women. There was no idea in their minds that I didn’t belong.

    “They weren’t thinking, ‘oh my God, she’s going to kill somebody.’”

    In fact, Fox being trans was so far from the radar that one teammate was quite nearly speechless when she found out.

    “I told her I was trans and I was about to come out, and the look on her face and what she said, she was totally surprised. She had no idea. And everything, my physical capabilities, my endurance, it was shocking to her.”

    Fox ultimately came out publicly — in articles on Outsports and in Sports Illustrated — to get ahead of an article being planned by a sportswriter planning to out Fox, she said.

    “Someone told that person that I was trans. I don’t know who. But they found out. And they contacted me and they were saying that because I was trans they didn’t want me to compete.”

    Fox isn’t sure who tipped off the journalist whose threats changed her life forever, but she isn’t looking back. She’s been inducted in the LGBT Sports Hall Of Fame. She is an indelible part of LGBTQ sports history. And, maybe most importantly, she generated conversations an opened possibilities for trans athletes in women’s sports that will be felt for generations.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #102
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,808

    Alana McLaughlin

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I changed this thread title from 'Transgender MMA' to 'Fallon Fox' because this is really just about her.
    Maybe I need to change this back...


    Transgender fighter Alana McLaughlin wins MMA debut

    By Mark Fischer
    September 11, 2021 10:42am Updated

    Alana McLaughlin, the second openly transgender woman to compete in MMA in the United States, won her debut Friday night via submission at the Combate Global prelims in Miami, Fla.

    The 38-year-old used a rear-naked choke against Celine Provost to end the match 3 minutes, 32 seconds into the second round.

    McLaughlin, who began her gender transition after leaving the U.S. Army Special Forces in 2010, said she hopes to be a pioneer for transgender athletes in combat sports.

    “I want to pick up the mantle that Fallon put down,” McLaughlin told Outsports before the fight, referring to Fallon Fox, who in 2012 became the first transgender woman to fight in MMA. “Right now, I’m following in Fallon’s footsteps. I’m just another step along the way and it’s my great hope that there are more to follow behind me.”


    Alana McLaughlin won her MMA debut Friday.
    Combate Global/Instagram
    Fox, who sat cageside Friday, last fought in 2014. Four years later, Patricio Manuel became the first transgender male to compete in a pro boxing match in the United States when he beat Hugo Aguilar via unanimous decision.


    McLaughlin was declared the victor by submission
    Combate Global/Instagram
    McLaughlin began training a year ago and was cleared to fight by the Florida State Boxing Commission after having her hormone levels tested, according to ESPN.

    She said it was a “nightmare” finding an opponent.

    “I have nothing but respect for [Provost],” McLaughlin said.

    The fight was originally scheduled for Aug. 6 but was postponed after Provost, a 35-year-old boxing and MMA veteran, tested positive for the coronavirus.

    Provost landed multiple punches in the first round before McLaughlin came out on top.

    As she was declared the victor, McLaughlin wore a shirt with the phrase, “End Trans Genocide.”


    McLaughlin is the second openly transgender woman to compete in MMA.
    Combate Global/Instagram
    Her debut comes as multiple states argue bills aimed at restricting transgender athletes from participating in youth, high school and college sports.

    “If we want to see more trans athletes, if we want to see more opportunities for trans kids, we’re going to have to work out way into those spaces and make it happen,” McLaughlin told Outsports. “It’s time for trans folks to be in sports and be more normalized.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •