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Thread: yellow face/white washing.

  1. #106
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    yellow face in DSPR?

    Asian Art Advocates Accuse the Shed of ‘Yellow-Face Casting’ in Its Kung-Fu Musical. But Its Director Says the Character Is Actually White
    Advocacy groups wrote a letter calling the "Dragon Spring Phoenix Rise" casting "offensive and unacceptable."
    Taylor Dafoe, July 24, 2019


    Dancers from Dragon Spring Phoniex Rise attend a rehearsal at the Tisch Skylights inside the The Shed. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images.

    Asian American advocacy groups are accusing the Shed of promoting racial stereotypes in its new “kung fu musical,” Dragon Spring Phoenix Rise. The production follows a twin brother and sister who uncover a secret group in Queens that has developed the power to extend human life. It was directed by Chen Shi-Zheng and co-written by Kung Fu Panda creators Jonathan Aibel and Glenn Berger.

    Last week, the Asian American Performers Action Coalition laid out its complaints in an open letter submitted to the Shed’s director, Alex Poots, and its board of directors. (The letter was co-signed by the Asian American Arts Alliance and eight other cultural groups working in theater and the arts.)

    “Your production appropriates Chinese culture, mixing it with western pop influences, relying on the most reductive tropes of the kung fu genre while providing no cultural context,” the letter reads. “It makes little effort to humanize or add nuance to the Chinese American characters, but instead, relies on stereotypes for characterization.”

    The letter castigates the museum for employing white writers, musicians, and production teams, and for casting a white actor in one of the show’s main roles, a Grandmaster named Lone Peak. “The decision to use yellow face casting is offensive and unacceptable to us and we demand a public explanation,” the letter reads.



    Poots offered that response this week in an email to group leaders: “We value your raising important issues. One of our primary goals is to be inclusive, and respectful to all. We will take into account your thoughts as we continue to commission works and would be happy to meet with members of your organization.”

    The Shed has also released a statement, credited to Poots, that further addresses the concerns raised in the letter. “This new work, which was commissioned by The Shed and privately funded, uses multiple art forms—kung fu, dance, music, song, and text—to create an allegory for the immigrant experience, transforming iconic Chinese images, movement, and ideas into a contemporary American context and modern-day fable,” the statement reads.

    It goes on to “acknowledge that some important aspects of Dragon need clarification.” Most significantly, that the character of Lone Peak, played by and written for David Patrick Kelly, was intended to be white and was “actually based on a Caucasian American instructor” who taught the actor during his own 30 years of martial arts training.

    “This feels to us like whitewashing, using Asian tropes to tell a story that is not really about Asians at all,” a representative of the Asian American Performers Action Coalition told artnet News, referring to Poots’s statement.

    The organization is in the process of putting together a response to the Shed’s director, but has no other plans for action at this time.
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    yellow face/white washing.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #107
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    The HBO TV show

    So is this Parasite TV series going to be whitewashed?

    Mark Ruffalo Talks 'Parasite' TV Role & Disney+'s 'She-Hulk'
    As well as addressing Martin Scorsese’s thoughts on the MCU.


    Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images For Disney
    Entertainment
    2 Hrs ago
    By Eric Brain

    Mark Ruffalo, who recently appeared at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo to answer a number of fan questions, has alluded that he may be taking a roll in the TV adaptation of Parasite.

    Addressing the speculation that he would be joining the HBO series, Ruffalo said “We’ve met. I love him [Bong Joon-ho], I love that movie… I might be playing the father in Parasite on a television show. I would love to do it. We’re sort of waiting on the script and all that, but yeah, that’s pretty much true and in the works.”

    Ruffalo also addressed rumors surrounding Disney+‘s She-Hulk, and although he was considerably quiet on the matter, he did say that “preliminary talks” were in place in reigniting his character, the Hulk, in the new series. Other notable moments from Ruffalo’s panel discussion include him discussing Martin Scorsese, who recently told Empire in an interview that the Marvel Cinematic Universe movies are not “cinema.”

    At the time, Scorsese said, “Honestly, the closest I can think of them, as well made as they are, with actors doing the best they can under the circumstances, is theme parks. It isn’t the cinema of human beings trying to convey emotional, psychological experiences to another human being.”

    According to Comicbook and despite Scorsese’s thoughts, Ruffalo answered an audience member’s question about who he’d like to work with on an MCU movie. He said, “That hasn’t done any Marvel movies? Martin Scorsese? I have worked with him, but I think he would make an amazing Marvel movie. It would be so dark. It would look a lot like Joker. That’s a great question, I need to put more time into that.”
    Gene Ching
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  3. #108
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    Feige regrets white washing

    May 20, 2021 7:27am PT
    Kevin Feige Admits Marvel Shouldn’t Have Whitewashed Tilda Swinton’s ‘Doctor Strange’ Character


    By Jordan Moreau


    Courtesy of Marvel
    Marvel film “Doctor Strange” courted some controversy when it cast actor Tilda Swinton, a white woman, in the role of The Ancient One, who is typically portrayed in the comics as an Asian man. Marvel Studios defended the casting leading up to the release, but now president Kevin Feige has addressed the controversy and admitted the company could have handled it differently.

    In 2016, Marvel Studios released a statement about Swinton’s casting, saying “Marvel has a very strong record of diversity in its casting of films and regularly departs from stereotypes and source material to bring its MCU to life. The Ancient One is a title that is not exclusively held by any one character, but rather a moniker passed down through time, and in this particular film the embodiment is Celtic. We are very proud to have the enormously talented Tilda Swinton portray this unique and complex character alongside our richly diverse cast.”

    On Wednesday, Feige spoke to Men’s Health for a cover story on the upcoming Asian-led Marvel film “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings,” saying that “Doctor Strange” could have cast an Asian actor.

    “We thought we were being so smart, and so cutting-edge,” he said. “We’re not going to do the cliché of the wizened, old, wise Asian man. But it was a wake-up call to say, ‘Well, wait a minute, is there any other way to figure it out? Is there any other way to both not fall into the cliché and cast an Asian actor?’ And the answer to that, of course, is yes.”

    At the time, “Doctor Strange” director Scott Derrickson and co-star Benedict Wong defended Swinton’s casting, while other Asian actors and visibility groups criticized it.

    In a major push for diversity, “Shang-Chi” will be the first Marvel film to feature a predominantly Asian cast, with the lead role being played by Simu Liu. The film hits theaters September 3.
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    Gene Ching
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  4. #109
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    I'm going to the screener of Bullet Train tomorrow

    ‘Bullet Train’ Director, Writer and ‘Maria Beetle’ Author Explain Choice to Cast Non-Japanese Actors: The Characters Are “Not Real People”
    Author Kōtarō Isaka says his story's ragtag crew of killers are maybe "not even Japanese," in response to criticism of how the film cast most of the assassins from his popular novel set in Japan.

    BY ABBEY WHITE
    JULY 28, 2022 9:45AM

    Bryan Tyree Henry and Brad Pitt in 'Bullet Train' SCOTT GARFIELD

    The Maria Beetle author, alongside the director and writer of its big screen adaptation Bullet Train, have opened up about the film’s decision to cast non-Japenese actors in the upcoming Sony feature film.

    In an interview with The New York Times, author Kōtarō Isaka was asked about how his story — which was originally published in Japan in 2010 and had its English language debut in print last year — has been adapted by Hollywood.

    According to the Times, the author regards his characters as “ethnically malleable,” and maintains his original Japanese setting and context do not matter as much, as the story’s ragtag crew of killers are “not real people, and maybe they’re not even Japanese.”

    Sanford Panitch, president of Sony Pictures Entertainment Motion Picture Group, said Isaka’s stance on Bullet Train‘s casting “gave us comfort in honoring its Japanese soul but at the same time giving the movie a chance to get big giant movie stars and have it work on a global scale.”

    For Bullet Train screenwriter Zak Olkewicz, the decision to cast beyond Japanese — or even more broadly with different Asian talent — “just shows you the strength of the original author’s work and how this could be a story that could transcend race anyway.”

    The decisions around the film’s casting choices have been heavily criticized online, including by Asian American media and cultural groups, who have argued that the movie whitewashes the original story’s ensemble of Japanese assassins by casting non-Japanese actors in many of the film’s most prominent roles. (The exception is Japanese actor Koji, who plays Kimura, one of the main assassins in the movie out in theaters on Aug. 5.)

    Speaking to AsAmNews in March, David Inoue, executive director of the Japanese American Citizens League, echoed sentiments that the movie’s casting was an act of whitewashing, as Bullet Train is a story that remains set in Japan and is based around characters that were originally Japanese.

    “Foreigners, or gaijin, remain a distinct minority in Japan, and to populate the movie with so many in the leading roles is ignoring the setting,” he said, before speaking to how the film undermines recent progress made in Hollywood around casting Asian and Asian American talent. “This movie seeks to affirm the belief that Asian actors in the leading roles cannot carry a blockbuster, despite all the recent evidence indicating otherwise, beginning with Crazy Rich Asians and extending to Shang Chi.”

    While speaking to the New York Times, Bullet Train director David Leitch noted that a discussion around whether to keep the story in Isaka’s original setting of Tokyo was broached, but he ultimately decided that “Tokyo is as international of a city as anywhere.”

    “We had conversations like, ‘Maybe it could be Europe, maybe it could be a different part of Asia,'” Leitch said. “Where could we see all these international types colliding?”

    And while the movie remains set in Japan, it wasn’t actually filmed in Tokyo due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Instead, it was captured on a sound stage, shifting it into “Japan’s future or like a Gotham City,” according to Isaka, who says he was “relieved” Bullet Train is now based in “a world that people don’t know.”

    As for how the movie features its Japanese characters, according to the Times, Olkewicz said the team worked to “preserve” the three generations of one Japanese family featured in Isaka’s novel — though they are not at the center of the film like many of the other characters are.

    “People who haven’t necessarily seen the movie will be surprised to find out that the plot pretty much kind of is about the Japanese characters and their story lines getting that resolution,” Olkewicz said. “We were all really aware and wanted to make it super inclusive and international.”
    Bullet-Train
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  5. #110
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    A two-fer on Den of Geek

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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