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Thread: tendons, not muscle...

  1. #1
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    tendons, not muscle...

    are the key to elastic energy storage which evolved allowing humans to kill effectively from a distance.

    Read these and see if you didn't already know this as principles from TCMA.

    http://cashp.gwu.edu/ntroach/the-evolution-of-throwing/

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal...67.html#access

    http://www.geeksaresexy.net/2013/07/...n-of-throwing/

  2. #2
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    "Elastic energy is potential mechanical energy that animals store in tendons, ligaments, and muscles. When these structures are stretched they elongate like an elastic band. When the forces pulling on these elements are then reduced, they return to their original shape, releasing the energy that was used to stretch them. This elastic energy can be used to power forceful movements (such as a frog’s jump) or to make movement more energetically efficient (such as the human Achilles tendon during running)."

    "We further found that three key anatomical changes that occurred during human evolution made this novel energy storage mechanism possible: expansion of the waist, lowering of the shoulders, and low humeral torsion. The expansion of the waist allows the torso to rotate independently from the hips. This torso rotation generates large forces needed to stretch the elastic tendons and ligaments in the shoulder. The lowering of the shoulder changes the orientation of many shoulder muscles, including the pectoralis major (the large chest muscle), which is crucial to storing energy. Finally, we found that low humeral torsion (the twisting of the upper arm bone) allows us to store more energy and thus making Pi Qua Tang Lang so effective."

    Ok, that last part about Praying mantis was just editorializing.

    But how often are we pointing out these details when trying to correct biomechanics in our students?

  3. #3
    tendon strength is gained by lifting heavy weights

    ur big poosy
    Last edited by bawang; 07-10-2013 at 06:16 AM.

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  4. #4
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    As if you can have one without the other...
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  5. #5
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    Tendon is muscle head. It's the tighter fibrous stuff that attaches the muscle to the bone. As SR said, you can't have one without the other.

    Regard the body as a unified machine. It all needs to be developed. It won't develop fully if you focus only on one thing about it.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, I know.

    Just giving people a chance to argue.

    After the arguing is done, then you all can post pics of scantily clad brunettes.

  7. #7
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    "They noted that around half the throwing power comes not from muscles, but from ligaments and tendons around the shoulder, which stretch, store and then quickly release elastic energy."

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by -N- View Post
    "They noted that around half the throwing power comes not from muscles, but from ligaments and tendons around the shoulder, which stretch, store and then quickly release elastic energy."
    Energy from where?
    Produced by what?

    Muscles.

    You do realize that the only way to "strengthen" tendons is by "load baring activities", yes?
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Energy from where?
    Produced by what?

    Muscles.

    You do realize that the only way to "strengthen" tendons is by "load baring activities", yes?
    Yep.

    Energy generated in the muscles, stored as potential energy in stretched assemblies, released in coordination with the rest of body motions.

    I know all that. I lift weights too. But I'm bored, so everybody feel free to argue.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by -N- View Post
    "They noted that around half the throwing power comes not from muscles, but from ligaments and tendons around the shoulder, which stretch, store and then quickly release elastic energy."
    Half muscle, half tendons. Shhhhhh...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Energy from where?
    Produced by what?

    Muscles.

    You do realize that the only way to "strengthen" tendons is by "load baring activities", yes?
    There are methods of training that can increase the amount of energy released by the tendon in proportion to the muscle, i.e., training the tendons.

    I know they have successfully trained basketball and volleyball jumpers to jump higher using this method of training. For example, holding a medicine ball, then dropping down by releasing your knees, then before you stop, changing direction and frog jumping.

    Or doing dips, and with your arms straight, using just the flex in your muscles, pop your hands up off the bar, then land, an repeat as long as you can.

    There's a name, plyometric? or something like that, for the training.

    I think it not unfamiliar to SPM or Pak Mei either.

    So, yes, you train the muscles, but the way you train changes the physiology too. Like fast twitch training and slow twitch...
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  12. #12
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    plyometric, thats not quite what they mean by plyometrics, especially the pop of the hand thing, and its normally recomended you dont do them unless you have a very good strength base 1.5-2x bodyweight squat , 1xbodyweight bench which again shows you cant really seperate the training of the two
    they are also very CNS intensive and should only be used sparingly in a training cycle
    Last edited by Frost; 07-11-2013 at 06:34 AM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yum Cha View Post
    There are methods of training that can increase the amount of energy released by the tendon in proportion to the muscle, i.e., training the tendons.

    I know they have successfully trained basketball and volleyball jumpers to jump higher using this method of training. For example, holding a medicine ball, then dropping down by releasing your knees, then before you stop, changing direction and frog jumping.

    Or doing dips, and with your arms straight, using just the flex in your muscles, pop your hands up off the bar, then land, an repeat as long as you can.

    There's a name, plyometric? or something like that, for the training.

    I think it not unfamiliar to SPM or Pak Mei either.

    So, yes, you train the muscles, but the way you train changes the physiology too. Like fast twitch training and slow twitch...
    Plyo's are load baring exercises.
    And as Frost mentioned, they should be used AFTER a good base strength is developed.
    I mean, you can use them before BUT you get far better results using them after.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  14. #14
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    I used Jump Shoes to increase my vertical leap one summer 5 - 8". The theory mentioned in the literature was that it lengthened the muscle and developed fast twitch muscle fiber.

  15. #15
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    Everybody talks muscle, but nobody wants to talk about TCMA use of elastic energy storage as a mechanism for temporal shift of energy transfer to generate higher peak power.

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