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Thread: A different view on the muscles / strength topics

  1. #16
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    One advantage that you will have from the strength training is it may be your "only friend" left through your old age. When you get old, even if you may try to maintain your ability as much you can, you will still lose your

    - speed (you can't move as fast),
    - flexibility (you can't kick as high),
    - spring (you can't jump as high),
    - balance (you can't stay on single leg too long),
    - endurance (you can't spar/wrestle 15 rounds),

    but you can still lift as much weight as when you were young. You will always have your strength until the day that you die. It's the only ability that if you do a good "maintance" job, you will be able to keep it.

    Of course if you stop your strength training at your age 70, you may lose it when you reach to your 80. This is why we can't afford to stop our training no matter we like it or not.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 07-27-2013 at 03:05 AM.
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  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    One advantage that you will have from the strength training is it may be your only friend left through your old age. When you get old, even if you may try to maintain your ability as much you can, you will lose your

    - speed (you can't move as fast),
    - flexibility (you can't kick as high),
    - spring (you can't jump as high),
    - balance (you can't stay on single leg too long),
    - endurance (you can't spar/wrestle 15 rounds),

    but you can still lift as much weight as when you were young. You will always have your strength until the day that you die (if you can do a good "maintance" job).
    My Sigung is 70.

    He is faster than any of us.
    He can kick better than us.
    He can jump very high, having trained in the art of lightness.
    His balance is insanely good.
    And he has the endurance to spar and run around and teach for hours.

    I look up to him as the model of what I want to be when I reach an "old" age.

    "Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win."
    - Sun Tzu

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neeros View Post
    My Sigung is 70.

    He is faster than any of us.
    He can kick better than us.
    He can jump very high, having trained in the art of lightness.
    His balance is insanely good.
    And he has the endurance to spar and run around and teach for hours.

    I look up to him as the model of what I want to be when I reach an "old" age.
    I'm sure your Sigung could do everything much better when he was 30 or 40 years old. You can't compare between different persons. You can only compare the same person between different time period.

    When I look at my Sigung's old clip. I can clearly see that when he was in his 70, his tornado kick can no longer be able to reach maximum height. The old age is the best killer for "jumping".

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqrp0...ature=youtu.be
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 07-27-2013 at 03:27 AM.
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  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    One advantage that you will have from the strength training is it may be your "only friend" left through your old age. When you get old, even if you may try to maintain your ability as much you can, you will still lose your

    - speed (you can't move as fast),
    - flexibility (you can't kick as high),
    - spring (you can't jump as high),
    - balance (you can't stay on single leg too long),
    - endurance (you can't spar/wrestle 15 rounds),

    but you can still lift as much weight as when you were young. You will always have your strength until the day that you die. It's the only ability that if you do a good "maintance" job, you will be able to keep it.

    Of course if you stop your strength training at your age 70, you may lose it when you reach to your 80. This is why we can't afford to stop our training no matter we like it or not.
    This is so true. There's a lot of research on the benefits of weight training through old age.... it's probably the best thing you can do if you want to have a good life in old age. Just as long as you're smart about it and don't do something stupid and blow out a knee or damage your back when you're young.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyB View Post
    This is so true. There's a lot of research on the benefits of weight training through old age.... it's probably the best thing you can do if you want to have a good life in old age. Just as long as you're smart about it and don't do something stupid and blow out a knee or damage your back when you're young.
    What kind of weight training? And to what end in particular?

    I've noticed one thing, skill makes you look faster because you are in better position and get the jump.

    Pak mei is different though, because it is an external art that becomes more internal over time, and us old blokes have material to work with.
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  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    One advantage that you will have from the strength training is it may be your "only friend" left through your old age. When you get old, even if you may try to maintain your ability as much you can, you will still lose your

    - speed (you can't move as fast),
    - flexibility (you can't kick as high),
    - spring (you can't jump as high),
    - balance (you can't stay on single leg too long),
    - endurance (you can't spar/wrestle 15 rounds),

    but you can still lift as much weight as when you were young. You will always have your strength until the day that you die. It's the only ability that if you do a good "maintance" job, you will be able to keep it.

    Of course if you stop your strength training at your age 70, you may lose it when you reach to your 80. This is why we can't afford to stop our training no matter we like it or not.
    You are completely wrong about this. Strength, like all other physical attributes, decreases with age.

  7. #22
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    Agreed. Speed and balance can increase though. Only decreases if you let it. Think Slow .
    Last edited by PalmStriker; 07-27-2013 at 07:49 PM.

  8. #23

    From the AARP

    http://www.aarp.org/health/longevity..._training.html

    Staying independent is a great incentive for maintaining strength as you age. Carrying groceries, opening jars, hauling mulch—it's easy to take routine tasks for granted when you can do them easily. Keeping your muscles and bones strong as you age improves your chances of continuing these tasks on your own and reduces your risk of falling.

    Having more muscle increases your metabolism, making it easier to maintain a healthy weight. Since muscle is an active tissue, it uses up more calories compared to fat.

    After age 20, most of us lose about a half pound of muscle a year. By the time we're 65, we will have lost 25 percent of our peak strength.

    Don't Blame Aging
    But you're not destined to grow softer and weaker just because you're getting older. Experts say most muscle loss comes from not using your muscles enough as you age, rather than aging itself. Using your muscles regularly will help them stay strong and firm, regardless of age, an important reason for older adults to strength train.

    Studies have shown that men in their 60s and 70s who strength train regularly have muscles that look and perform as well as inactive men in their 20s and 30s.

  9. #24
    Studies have shown that men in their 60s and 70s who strength train regularly have muscles that look and perform as well as inactive men in their 20s and 30s.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaRoux View Post
    Studies have shown that men in their 60s and 70s who strength train regularly have muscles that look and perform as well as inactive men in their 20s and 30s.
    yep its not rocket science really, those that train when they are older will be stronger than those that dont, they will also in certain cases be better than those a lot younger who dont train

    And as for the comment that strength does not decrease as you get older made by YKW, that simply is so wrong its not funny, there is a reason all strength sports have separate senior and masters divisions

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    And as for the comment that strength does not decrease as you get older made by YKW, that simply is so wrong its not funny, there is a reason all strength sports have separate senior and masters divisions
    steroids is hell of a drug

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  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bawang View Post
    steroids is hell of a drug
    mmm sorry WTF are you o about this time

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Yes, that is the ONLY valid critique of over-emphasizing ST.
    This.

    If both guys have equal skill, the stronger guy will win.

    If both guys have equal strength, the better skilled guy will win.

    When I first started training grappling I was stronger than most people in the class. I didn't know wtf I was doing, but sometimes I could literally just hold them and keep them from moving or submitting me.

    When I rolled with other noobs who also only knew the same 2 techniques as me but weren't as strong as me, I would just use my strength to get them to move. I didn't have to use good technique.

    With people who were better than me but not as strong as me, sometimes I could resist them with strength alone but eventually I'd get tired and they would submit me.

    With people who were better than me and stronger than me, they would easily beat me.
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  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by -N- View Post
    This can happen from over-relying on any method, not just strength.

    I stopped using a jumping au-lau-choi attack when chasing down an opponent because it would always work. I wanted to force myself to use other skills.
    What is that technique? I Googled it but didn't see anything.
    "If you like metal you're my friend" -- Manowar

    "I am the cosmic storms, I am the tiny worms" -- Dimmu Borgir

    <BombScare> i beat the internet
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  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronFist View Post
    What is that technique? I Googled it but didn't see anything.
    Same as the first two in this video, but with a running in and jumping footwork and punch down into the face from above.

    http://youtu.be/Y8nmSZxIxd0

    A little bit like a Muay Thai superman punch, but with a Praying Mantis setup.

    I would start from right lead, throw a left jump roundhouse kick, left grab right cross, run/jump 1-2-3 (au-lau-choi or "superman punch").

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