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Thread: Archery

  1. #16
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  2. #17
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    I think this thread is missing some bow hotties...



    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  3. #18
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    also, for those with the exprience of it, what is it like to use your hand as the arrow rest vs a rest on the bow?

    I know a lot of the modern rests give minimal contact to the fletchings, is there that much of a difference?
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  4. #19
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    I prefer no arrow rest for my longbow. I'm an instinctive shooter so it just feels better to me. I also tilt the bow a little to the right when shooting in order to open up the sight window and to make it easier to shoot when kneeling.

  5. #20
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    So i know modern bows (maybe some traditional bows idk) guide the bow string so that the string sets itself to the side in line with your sight so that the force behind the arrow is direct. on a traditional long bow, from what i can tell, the bow string rides down the center, causing another element of shooting, to adjust for the pull on the arrow from the offset bowstring.

    am i understanding this correctly?
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  6. #21
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    no distinction

    ...but you might have just launched a new KFM meme.








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  7. #22
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    I do recurve and am teaching my girls the recurve.
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    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  8. #23
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    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucas View Post
    So i know modern bows (maybe some traditional bows idk) guide the bow string so that the string sets itself to the side in line with your sight so that the force behind the arrow is direct. on a traditional long bow, from what i can tell, the bow string rides down the center, causing another element of shooting, to adjust for the pull on the arrow from the offset bowstring.

    am i understanding this correctly?

    This may help...

    I lifted the description below from this website: http://www.meta-synthesis.com/archery/archery.html

    Also, here's a wiki link that has a decent description regarding the correct spine: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archer's_paradox


    Simplified Arrow Dynamics: The "One Bend" Archer's Paradox

    The term Archer's Paradox was coined in the mid 1930s by Dr. Robert P. Elmer to 'explain' why an arrow would hit a target when, from all appearances, it should strike to the left.

    The archer's paradox is most clearly observed with traditional longbows that do not have a cut away in the riser for the arrow rest.

    When shooting a traditional longbow, the arrow must point significantly to the left (for a right handed archer), yet a well shot arrow will shoot straight with respect to the centre shot line of the bow.

    The "archer's paradox" is that the arrow shoots straight, even though it starts off pointing outwards.

    Attachment 7732

    Attachment 7733

    The diagram below shows a simplified "one bend" explanation of the archer's paradox, and this is the explanation I give to beginners.

    I say, "the string pushes the arrow which bends around the bow":

    TOP DOWN VIEW OF ARROW, STRING & BOW

    Attachment 7734

    The crucial point is that the arrow must be of the correct spine so that it dynamically bends around the bow, the fletchings/vanes do not touch the riser or arrow rest and the arrow flies cleanly to the target.

    If an arrow of the wrong spine is shot, the fletchings, nock or arrow shaft will hit the bow. Indeed, consistently damaged fletchings/vanes are always an indication of poor arrow clearance.

    Thus, the archer, bow and arrows must be matched with each other.

  10. #25
    Gotta love physics. It feels like it's time to break out the HD and some controls.

    I haven't had a chance to read the full article, but I did check the wiki really quick and read your post and I have a question.

    When you say one bend, do you mean that it curves in then back out to shoot straight? Would it not actually be more complicated than that? Many bends decreasing with time/distance? So technically it doesn't really shoot straight at all? Or at least not on the first leg of travel?

    I've never used a long bow, not counting the crap we made as kids, that is. I've only used newer bow styles. I would love to try this with different dynamic spines on film.


    Oh, and god bless that woman in the tree!

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syn7 View Post
    When you say one bend, do you mean that it curves in then back out to shoot straight? Would it not actually be more complicated than that? Many bends decreasing with time/distance? So technically it doesn't really shoot straight at all? Or at least not on the first leg of travel?
    I believe an arrow ungulates back and forth all the way to it's target, and this stored kinetic energy is one of the reasons an arrow penetrates so deeply. I performed a quick search but couldn't find a good video on this type of action. My question now is how long would it take for an arrow to straighten out? My thoughts are that there isn't a bow with enough power to shoot an arrow far enough for it to straighten out completely, and if it did straighten out then how much energy would it loose?

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenBrain View Post
    I believe an arrow ungulates back and forth all the way to it's target, and this stored kinetic energy is one of the reasons an arrow penetrates so deeply. I performed a quick search but couldn't find a good video on this type of action. My question now is how long would it take for an arrow to straighten out? My thoughts are that there isn't a bow with enough power to shoot an arrow far enough for it to straighten out completely, and if it did straighten out then how much energy would it loose?
    Yah, we're on the same page with that one. Maybe it would eventually fly straight on a really long shot on the downward leg of the arc. I would think, and this is pure bullshit speculation, that the power wouldn't matter as much as the actual arc in this scenario. Again, I would love to experiment with this. It would be tough over longer distances w/o a ridiculously expensive camera though. Just to buy one that would work on the range would be expensive enough, and you would need a few of em. Alas, I have not a one. It's on my list, but you know how that is. It's a long list, lol.

    I did find a few slomos for short ranges, and it does indeed undulate right up to and after the impact. You can even see this in a modern bow. My guess is that deep penetration is due to undulation, like a snake, but also because it literally makes room for itself as it goes in reducing the friction on the shaft as it passes through before the tissues close back around it. Kinda like when you wiggle a stick to get it deep in the dirt. But again, pure speculation on my part. I do know that it can be tough to yank a target or field head from an animal sometimes.

    You have peaked my interest. Hello youtube!

  13. #28
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    I found a couple of neat slow motion videos showing the arrow in flight.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CO102jz8sFM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ms4uTb5zkVI


    Syn, I like the wiggle a stick in the dirt analogy. I think that's prolly right on.

  14. #29
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    Yumi vs English Long Bow

    An interesting vid I came across, with some surprising results...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jrOIQRnKcnc

    I still think the English Long Bow had a higher rate of fire...but food for thought.

    Check out the bow on this last chick...keep looking till you find it.
    Last edited by Hebrew Hammer; 08-19-2013 at 11:40 PM.
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  15. #30
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    Well, this thread certainly is easy on the eyes...


    Lucas, you may be interested in this video series. This guy's method of bow building is pretty good and mixes some modern techniques with primitive construction nicely. As I've said before I don't use an arrow rest but other than that his bows turn out just like the longbows I like to use. Also, a good way to find cured Hickory and Osage Orange staves (also called hedge apple, horse apple, bois d'arc, bodark, or bodock) is to find somebody in your area that sells them as rough fence posts. Just make sure to find them with the bark still on one side. If you can find whole un-split poles that would be ideal.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_bJe4CYo-A

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