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Thread: Longevity for elderly people

  1. #1

    Longevity for elderly people

    If you could recommend 1 book for an elderly person -
    or one system - what would it be ?

    I think tai chi is too complicated & they are too close minded to learn the forms - or they may just not be interested in living longer .- a lot of them will not accept computers

    - maybe hsing I ?

    --------------------1 book Please

    must be a book

    something simple , yet effective .
    any feedback would be greatly appreciated

    must be simple & to the point
    Last edited by Throwaway Child; 09-03-2013 at 04:03 PM.

  2. #2
    I think this is a really good workout if you have 1 hour to invest in your health feeling stronger & getting you chi circulating - since being out of work & unable to work too hard

    ----------------------https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDtmmk8YQvk

    there are 8 parts -
    Last edited by Throwaway Child; 08-31-2013 at 10:29 AM.

  3. #3
    Last edited by Throwaway Child; 08-31-2013 at 01:55 PM.

  4. #4
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    I have come to realize that there is a 'will to live' to seek activities to enhance that goal. That means that anything the 'elderly' person believes will give him/her the tools to prolong and even make interesting a viable existence.

    Walking is still excellent in this regard! do not limit the mind if the goals are positive. I would also that that 'elderly' is a loaded term. TOme it implies people over 70 years but I have seen people at 55 exhibiting the same lack of mobility as those who are able at 70 years. One fellow from a taiji class about 15 years ago
    was a freshman in college at the time and when he graduated, he could bared walk due to his reliance of medication for his OA/RA condition.

  5. #5
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    Single leg standing, single leg standing, and still single leg standing. When you get older, balance is very important to you.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 08-31-2013 at 12:48 PM.
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
    Less opinion -> less argument
    No opinion -> no argument

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by mawali View Post
    I have come to realize that there is a 'will to live' to seek activities to enhance that goal. That means that anything the 'elderly' person believes will give him/her the tools to prolong and even make interesting a viable existence.

    Walking is still excellent in this regard! do not limit the mind if the goals are positive. I would also that that 'elderly' is a loaded term. TOme it implies people over 70 years but I have seen people at 55 exhibiting the same lack of mobility as those who are able at 70 years. One fellow from a taiji class about 15 years ago
    was a freshman in college at the time and when he graduated, he could bared walk due to his reliance of medication for his OA/RA condition.
    some can no longer walk without problems

    when starting over - just standing like this is very difficult -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qZanIByNhE


    standing is actually very difficult & a lot of work
    I have been in a lot worse shape at a lot younger age due to malnutrition etc.
    Last edited by Throwaway Child; 08-31-2013 at 02:31 PM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    Single leg standing, single leg standing, and still single leg standing. When you get older, balance is very important to you.
    agreed
    I also find that stretching greatly increases my balance - I do not know why - but it does - especially hamstrings

    if you add some resistance or strength training you are less likely to break something if you do fall it strengthens the bones & restores life to the marrow

    these basic stances have also helped a lot with balance --->http://www.phoenixdragonkungfu.com/t...c-stances.aspx

    if I listen to my body & don't over do it
    Last edited by Throwaway Child; 08-31-2013 at 03:09 PM.

  8. #8
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    18 Posture Taiji Qigong is very easy for old people to follow and practice. There are a lot of book and videos of this routine.

    It is known as Shiba Shi Taiji Qigong on YouTube.
    My Martial Arts articles archive:

    http://www.bgtent.com/naturalcma/index.htm

    Shaolin Qigong / Neigong Healing & Self Defense Programs and Seminars:

    http://www.jindaolife.com
    http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchool/index.html

    Qigong Program: http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchool/QigongProgram.htm
    Chinese Martial Art Program: http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchoo...ArtProgram.htm


  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by mawali View Post
    I have come to realize that there is a 'will to live' to seek activities to enhance that goal. That means that anything the 'elderly' person believes will give him/her the tools to prolong and even make interesting a viable existence.

    Walking is still excellent in this regard! do not limit the mind if the goals are positive. I would also that that 'elderly' is a loaded term. TOme it implies people over 70 years but I have seen people at 55 exhibiting the same lack of mobility as those who are able at 70 years. One fellow from a taiji class about 15 years ago
    was a freshman in college at the time and when he graduated, he could bared walk due to his reliance of medication for his OA/RA condition.
    And yet we had an elderly lady come into a bone marrow cleansing class being unable to walk on her own to being able to walk swiftly without her walker by the end of the lesson. It all comes down to quality of method, teacher,and student. Most meditation and qi gong taught is utter ****.

    "Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win."
    - Sun Tzu

  10. #10
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    A book will do nothing.

    Longevity is a matter of genetics for the most part.

    If you want your mom or dad or gramma or grampa to get active, be active with them.
    Walk with them. Engage their intellect. Revitalize their curiosity.

    Interaction is key here.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    A book will do nothing.

    Longevity is a matter of genetics for the most part.

    If you want your mom or dad or gramma or grampa to get active, be active with them.
    Walk with them. Engage their intellect. Revitalize their curiosity.

    Interaction is key here.
    I disagree --

    THE WAY OF ENERGY - by Master Lam, Kam Chuen

    this is a perfect book for this subject

    http://www.lamassociation.org/Publications.html

    I don't like to practice around other people -
    Last edited by Throwaway Child; 09-09-2013 at 04:30 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Throwaway Child View Post
    I don't like to practice around other people -
    How can you train TCMA without partner?

    Do you play chess with yourself? Do you let your right hand to fight against your left hand? It can be done but where is the "fun"?
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 09-09-2013 at 07:36 PM.
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
    Less opinion -> less argument
    No opinion -> no argument

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    How can you train TCMA without partner?

    Do you play chess with yourself? Do you let your right hand to fight against your left hand? It can be done but where is the "fun"?
    what is tcma ?

    I do not play chess

    I am a solitary person - I don't like the people where I live
    I stay to myself - I do not have any friends here

    if I had to spend the rest of my life in prison - I would want my own cell lockdown 24/7

    I just don't like them

    I do internal for health - everyone else wants to fight
    I do not

    I wish I could change my user name : )
    maybe I'll change my email & ip address & logout 4 ever

    Master Lam, Kam Chuen's books are good - I like them -

    http://www.lamassociation.org/Publications.html
    Last edited by Throwaway Child; 09-10-2013 at 08:02 AM.

  14. #14
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    ttt 4 2019!

    Didn't know where else to post this. That photo...

    Lost youth can return
    | Siu Sai-wo 25 Jul 2019



    The annual Book Fair is not only a book exhibition but also a major cultural event, boasting a variety of forums and seminars. Last week, I was invited to attend one hosted by health-nurturing expert and qigong master Gao Yun.

    Aged over 80, Gao made a graceful and impressive entrance in a black unitard and three-inch stilettos. She told us she has been wearing the same-size outfit for 30 years, and there are photographs as proof.

    She said while her physique has not changed in the past 50 years, she didn't always have robust health.

    As a child, she was weak and sickly. One time, a Chinese medical practitioner made a prescription for her congenital arthritis according to the method of "fighting poison with poison" but it almost killed her.

    As she was lingering on the brink of death, she felt she was high in the sky, deep in the clouds, so she later adopted the name "Gao Yun" - literally high clouds.

    Her physical condition remained poor for some time. At one stage, she weighted 140 catties (84 kg) and her waist was swollen.

    Determined to find ways to improve her health, she acquired knowledge from different sources and eventually distilled what she has learned to create her own school of health maintenance methods.

    Gao said she had never felt young when she was young. But after receiving training, she found that youthfulness can actually be regained, like grafting can give plants a new lease on life.

    She cited legendary Taoist guru Zhang Sanfeng's Wu Gen Shu - rootless tree. A part of this ci poetry talks about how a tree with no roots and scanty flowers is rejuvenated by grafting on it new branches from another tree, which shows that aging is "healable." As such, a person who is in the 70s can be young.

    Labor and Welfare Secretary Law Chi-kwong once said the sixties is the new middle age. If everyone can reverse the process of aging, I would say Law's saying is actually overly conservative!

    Siu Sai-wo is publisher of Sing Tao Daily
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #15
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    Gus Kao

    Still going at 98.

    Quarter century later, founder of Qigong class is still going strong
    Gus Kao a regular at the class he once taught
    By Maggie Sharpe
    Staff writer

    Gus Kao, who just turned 98, has led the Qigong exercise class at Rossmoor for a quarter of a century. But, he says, a bout with a stomach ulcer earlier this year has sapped his energy and he’s passed the mantle to other instructors.

    Peter Li, president of the Chinese-American Association of Rossmoor (CAAR), which sponsors the class, describes Kao as “one of the great treasures of our club.”

    Another CAAR member and Qigong devotee, Muriel Luck, says, “Gus has a wonderful memory and a great sense of humor.”

    Although he’s stopped teaching, Kao’s still a regular at the weekday morning class – and he’s very much revered by participants as the founder of the centuries-old Chinese practice at Rossmoor.

    That popularity was evidenced on Nov. 5, when 105 people showed up at Kao’s 98th birthday party at China Wall Buffet in Concord – complete with birthday cake.

    Li takes Qigong with his wife, Marjorie. He said that even though Kao no longer instructs, he still chips in during class.

    “Usually, Gus watches people who are not doing it right and barks out comments,” joked Li. Kao was among about 40 residents in the class on a recent Tuesday morning at the Fitness Center. For about 1-½ years, Irene


    Rossmoor resident Gus Kao, 98, practices Qigong during a morning session at the Fitness Center. News photo by Dan Rosenstrauch


    Rossmoor resident Marjorie Li participates in the Qigong class at the Fitness Center. News photo by Dan Rosenstrauch

    Keenan has been taking Qigong, which is open only to members of the Chinese-American Association of Rossmoor.

    “I find it soothing and calming, like an extension of meditation,” said Keenan of the slow and rhythmic movements set to Chinese music. “I find it promotes strength, coordination and balance.”

    Marjorie Li agrees.

    “This is the first activity I signed up for when I moved to Rossmoor three years ago,” she said. “Sometimes I come in stressed, but breathing in and out in this mindful way, I walk out feeling better and calmer.”

    Kao learned Qigong in 1989 and has practiced it ever since. When a friend hurt his knee, Kao suggested he try Qigong to help the knee heal.

    “That was the beginning of the class,” said Kao. “It started out with a few people, and from there we formed a group that originally met at the old Pavilion at Hillside.”

    Now the class has dozens of members and there’s a waiting list to join.

    Move to Rossmoor

    Kao has lived at Rossmoor for 31 years. He came here from Taiwan in 1988 with his wife, Elizabeth, who died in 1995 after a long battle with breast cancer.

    “My daughter had moved to the U.S. and was living in Pennsylvania with her family,” said Kao. “After I retired, she said to me and my wife, ‘Come join us in the U.S.’” Ironically, after they decided to make the move to Rossmoor, Kao’s son-in-law got posted to the Philippines. “But we stayed on anyway,” said Kao with a chuckle.

    Kao also has two sons, one in Thailand and one living in Taiwan, as well as eight grandchildren.

    Early life

    Kao was born in mainland China in 1922 and went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in literature from the Catholic University in Beijing. “My father was going to send me to the U.S. to study, but then the Second World War broke out,” said Kao.

    He said he was more interested in sports than studying.

    “I’ve always played sports. I was a pitcher for my college baseball team and quarterback for the football team,” recalls Kao, adding that those American sports were abandoned when WWII started.

    “After the war broke out, our American coach ended up in a concentration camp,” said Kao.

    He moved to Taiwan after college, working first in import/export and then for a petrochemical company, until his retirement and move to Rossmoor at age 70.

    Since his wife died, he’s traveled the world, visiting Europe, Africa and South America.

    He’s always been active but has slowed down with the passing years.


    Residents participate in a Qigong exercise class. News photos by Dan Rosenstrauch


    moves during a recent class Rossmoor resident Peter Li, President of the Chinese-Amer-ican Association, practices

    “I used to play golf but had to stop after I hurt my wrist 10pin bowling,” said Kao.

    He’s danced with Rossmoor Ballroom Dance Club, hiked with the Trails Club, played countless games of mah jongg, taken photos for the Rossmoor News, made a traditional Buddhist angel in a ceramics class, still drives around Rossmoor (he just passed a DMV test in September) – and attends daily Mass at St. Anne’s Catholic Church.

    Life at 98

    Kao, who still lives independently at his Rossmoor manor, has a few tips for healthy living – besides practicing Qigong. “Don’t drink ice water, it’s not good for the stomach; and don’t take a cold shower – doesn’t that hurt you?” he asks. Then with a chuckle he adds, “But I used to enjoy a nice cold beer.”

    Since he developed the ulcer – which he attributes to “too many aspirin” after stent surgery – he’s modified his diet. He cooks for himself every evening, but there’s no more raw vegetables or salad on the plate.

    “I eat simply – lots of cooked vegetables and rice,” he said.

    His nightly regimen is usually dinner, followed by ball games on TV. He’s also an optimist.

    “I have to be optimistic, otherwise I wouldn’t have lived this long,” he said.

    And don’t underestimate the power of a nap.

    “I take a long nap in the afternoon,” he muses, “couldn’t live without it.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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