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Thread: Hot Sauce!

  1. #46
    Oh, and sweet potato soup. Now that's some **** right there. My father makes this amazing curry paste. And some coconut milk... Tasty. Simple.

    I like to let the food work for me. While I may experiment here and there, I don't really go crazy with the spices and all that. Although I do make a mean ass Ethiopian curry my ex taught me. Use it as a rub, or in soup, stir fry, whatever. Pretty versatile flavour.

    I tried making the curry paste but my dad is so good at it, I just get him to make extra for me.

  2. #47
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    Nice! Thanks for sharing!

    We do just about the same process for the salsa so I guess we're basically trying to find that happy equilibrium. I'm sure I've said this before but your dad sounds like a cool cat.

    I have to make a correction. I said fried sweet potato but I actually meant baked. We dice them and bake em in the oven with a little cinnamon and brown sugar, or just plain. We're not much into frying anything anymore. We mostly grill/smoke, poach, sauté or bake.

  3. #48
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    Nice thread. My favorite hot sauces are made by El Yucateco. Their red, green and black habanero sauces are good, but to me the standout is the chipotle sauce. I prepare food only in order to have something to use that sauce on. It is dangerously addictive.
    Quote Originally Posted by bawang View Post
    if the epitome of CMA is dancing like a transgender Uyghur acrobat with down syndrome, then by all means.

  4. #49
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    no trademark

    I've been wondering about this. I thought it was a brand name and I see it on everything now.

    With no trademark, Sriracha name is showing up everywhere


    David Tran, who operates his family-owned Huy Fong Foods out of a 650,000-square-foot facility in Irwindale, doesn't see his failure to secure a trademark for his Sriracha sauce as a missed opportunity. He says it's free advertising for a company that's never had a marketing budget. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)
    By David Pierson


    Some of the biggest names in the food business are banking on the popularity of Sriracha
    Sriracha's inventor says knock-offs give him free advertising; his sales keep growing
    Sriracha was inspired by flavors from across Southeast Asia and named after a coastal city in Thailand

    Wander down almost any supermarket aisle and it's easy to spot one of the food industry's hottest fads. Sriracha, the fiery red Asian chili sauce, has catapulted from a cult hit to flavor du jour, infusing burgers, potato chips, candy, vodka and even lip balm.

    That would seem like a boon for the man who made the sauce a household name. Except for one glaring omission.

    David Tran, a Vietnamese refugee who built the pepper empire from nothing, never trademarked the term, opening the door for others to develop their own sauce or seasoning and call it Sriracha.

    That's given some of the biggest names in the food business such as Heinz, Frito-Lay, Subway and Jack in the Box license to bank off the popularity of a condiment once named Bon Appétit magazine's ingredient of the year.

    Restaurant chains and candy and snack makers aren't buying truckloads of Tran's green-capped condiment emblazoned with the rooster logo. Nor are they paying Tran a dime in royalties to use the word "Sriracha" (pronounced "see-RAH-cha").

    "In my mind, it's a major misstep," said Steve Stallman, president of Stallman Marketing, a food business consultancy. "Getting a trademark is a fundamental thing."

    Tran, who now operates his family-owned company Huy Fong Foods out of a 650,000-square-foot facility in Irwindale, doesn't see his failure to secure a trademark as a missed opportunity. He says it's free advertising for a company that's never had a marketing budget. It's unclear whether he's losing out: Sales of the original Sriracha have grown from $60 million to $80 million in the last two years alone.

    "Everyone wants to jump in now," said Tran, 70. "We have lawyers come and say 'I can represent you and sue' and I say 'No. Let them do it.'"

    Tran is so proud of the condiment's popularity that he maintains a daily ritual of searching the Internet for the latest Sriracha spinoff.

    He believes all the exposure will lead more consumers to taste the original spicy, sweet concoction — which was inspired by flavors from across Southeast Asia and named after a coastal city in Thailand. Tran also said he was discouraged to seek a trademark because it would have been difficult getting one named after a real-life location.

    That hasn't stopped competitors from scratching their heads.

    Tony Simmons, chief executive of the McIlhenny Co., makers of Tabasco, said Tran's Sriracha sauce was the "gold standard" for Sriracha-style sauces, which has largely come to mean any dressing that packs a piquant punch of chili paste, vinegar, garlic and sugar.

    Simmons was reassured by his lawyers that Tabasco would have no problem releasing a similar sauce using the name Sriracha.

    "We spend enormous time protecting the word 'Tabasco' so that we don't have exactly this problem," Simmons said. "Why Mr. Tran did not do that, I don't know."

    There are now a slew of sauces on the market labeled Sriracha, including variations by Frank's Red Hot, Kikkoman and Lee Kum Kee.

    The category has helped ignite U.S. hot sauce sales, which have jumped from $229 million in 2000 to $608 million last year, according to Euromonitor.

    "What we're seeing among consumers is demand, not just for heat, but more complex, regional flavors," said Beth Bloom, a food and drink analyst for Mintel. "With Sriracha, Huy Fong introduced a new style and a whole new category of hot sauce."

    Although Taco Bell and Pizza Hut are some of the latest national brands to experiment with their own Sriracha seasoning in tacos, nachos and pizza sauce, it's Tabasco's that has Tran admittedly sweating.

    "My 'rooster killer' jumped into the market," said Tran, borrowing a description he saw on a food blog. "They're a big company. They have a lot of money and a lot of advertising."

    Simmons isn't counting on toppling Sriracha any time soon.

    "Mr. Tran got an awful big head start," he said.

    After a limited release, Tabasco will distribute its Sriracha sauce nationwide sometime in the first quarter of this year, Simmons said.

    It may be too late for Tran to successfully argue that the trademark belongs to him.

    Two dozen applications to use the word have been filed with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. None has been granted for Sriracha alone. The word is now too generic, the agency determined.

    "The ship has probably sailed on this, which is unfortunate because they've clearly added something to American cuisine that wasn't there before," said Kelly P. McCarthy, a partner and expert on brand protection and trademark issues at the law firm Sideman & Bancroft.

    Variations of the popular hot sauce Sriracha are appearing in stores, and creator David Tran can't stop them.

    She said it's not uncommon for popular products to lose their trademarks because they've become "genericized," such as Otis Elevator Co.'s use of "escalator" and Bayer AG's loss of "aspirin."

    Tran's attorney isn't so sure the same applies to Sriracha.

    Rod Berman, who was primarily retained 10 years ago to tackle counterfeiters, thinks many consumers still associate Sriracha with Huy Fong. He cited the mountain of publicity, films and growing sales as evidence.

    "My instinct is to want to go after the people that used the Sriracha name," said Berman, an intellectual property lawyer who has represented the Los Angeles Lakers, Pom Wonderful and Nordstrom.

    But that's not realistic, he says, especially for a medium-size company like Huy Fong.

    "Large companies, the Mattels and Disneys of the world, try to protect everything and have the budget for that," Berman said. "With smaller enterprises like Huy Fong, you have to pick and choose."

    That's why Tran has gone after knockoffs of Huy Fong's Sriracha from China. Unlike the name, Tran trademarked his rooster logo and distinctive bottle.

    At the same time, Tran has signed licensing agreements with a handful of specialty producers such as Rogue, which brews a Sriracha hot stout beer packaged in a red bottle and green cap to look like Huy Fong's signature sauce, and Pop Gourmet, which makes a Sriracha popcorn and will soon release a Sriracha seasoning spice.

    Even with these partnerships, Tran doesn't charge any royalty fees. All he asks is that they use his sauce and stay true to its flavor.

    "I wanted to bring people the real stuff," said David Israel, chief executive of Pop Gourmet in Kent, Wash.

    The Sriracha popcorn is the company's No. 1 seller, and Israel has high hopes for the new seasoning, which took nine months to develop.

    For the Rogue stout, Sriracha is added during the fermentation process. The beer quickly sold out.

    "We could have gone and just used Huy Fong's sauce, but we also wanted to use their name" and logo, said Brett Joyce, president of the Newport, Ore., company.

    Randy Clemens, author of "The Sriracha Cookbook" and "The Veggie-Lover's Sriracha Cookbook," said the licensed products preserve Huy Fong's flavor, unlike the mass-market efforts.

    "A little kick, but to put Sriracha in the title is a little disingenuous," Clemens said. "What makes the original so great is that it's bold and kicks you in the face."

    Tran agreed his imitators fall short in flavor and spice, but like the trademark, he isn't losing any sleep over it.

    "David is fine with that since in some indirect way, we will still reap the benefit of the word 'Sriracha' being used," said Donna Lam, Tran's longtime deputy. "We seem to be the best-known Sriracha out there, and everyone seems to use our brand as the gold standard. If anything, we are proud we started the Sriracha craze."

    david.pierson@latimes.com
    Gene Ching
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  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaolin-Do View Post
    Cholula, or... I forgot. Cholula is good. Tabasco is too vinegary.
    Completely agree. I was going to type it, but you beat me to it. Love that stuff, feel the same way about Tabasco. Not bad on an oyster, but not my favorite general purpose sauce.
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  6. #51
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    David Tran

    Gene Ching
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  7. #52
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    Taco Bell's Diablo

    Taco Bell Will Launch Limited-Time Extra-Hot Sauce Packets
    By Laura Northrup April 23, 2015


    (Taco Bell)

    Do you like to slather your Taco Bell meals with hot sauce, but find the chain’s standard packets insufficiently hot? Great news: super-hot sauce, which they’re calling “Diablo,” will be available from Taco Bell beginning on May 5. The not-so-great news for hot sauce fans is that the new sauce is only temporary.

    This isn’t the first novel hot sauce product that we’ve heard about in recent months: Taco Bell has also reportedly been testing tortilla chips on a hot sauce theme in some markets. Those chips in “Diablo” flavor would probably be tongue-scorchingly delicious, but it seems unlikely that Taco Bell would produce any.

    We don’t know how limited the availability of Diablo sauce will be, so you should probably grab handfuls of it and write a letter to the company if you don’t like it. Slathering some on a breakfast biscuit taco would certainly wake you up in the morning.
    How hot could this be? Taco Bell hot sauce is weak.
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  8. #53
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    Ghost Pepper

    UCSF: Man ate a pepper so hot it tore a hole in his esophagus
    Ben Guarino, The Washington Post Updated 11:58 am, Tuesday, October 18, 2016

    A ghost pepper's heat is described in terms normally reserved for carpet bombings. Its heat is measured at 1 million units on the Scoville scale, a per-mass measure of capsaicin - the chemical compound that imbues peppers with heat - that until recently was a world record. Peppers that pass the 1 million mark are called superhot; as a rule they are reddish and puckered, as though one of Satan's internal organs had prolapsed. To daredevil eaters of a certain stripe, the superhot peppers exist only to challenge.
    When consumed, ghost peppers and other superhots provoke extreme reactions. "Your body thinks it's going to die," as Louisiana pepper grower Ronald Primeaux told the AP in October. "You're not going to die."


    Photo: Doug Cannell/Getty Images
    The ghost pepper, also known as naga jolokia or bhut jolokia, measures over 1,000,000 Scoville Units (a jalapeño is about 5,000).

    But, demonstrated by a rare though severe incident at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center, reported recently in the Journal of Emergency Medicine, superhot peppers can cause bodily harm. A 47-year-old man, unnamed in the case study, attempted a super-spicy feat - eating a hamburger served with a ghost pepper puree - and tore a hole in his esophagus.
    Ghost peppers were first grown in India, where they are known as bhut jolokia. A seed from the pepper can cause a mouth to smolder for up to a half-hour. On YouTube, faces broken by the "ghost pepper challenge" devolve into tears, runny noses and hiccups.
    The Washington Post's Tim Carman described eating a pea-sized chunk of the pepper, sans seeds, in 2012. "It was as if my head had become a wood-burning oven, lighting up my tongue and the interior of my skull," he wrote. "Milk provided little relief, until the burn began to subside on its own about 10 minutes later."
    Feel the burn: 9 things to know about hot peppers Photo: Courtesy
    Primeaux, who hopes to claim the world's hottest title through cultivating his Louisiana Creeper variety, said, "When you put one of these in your mouth, it's a whole 'nother ballgame," in his interview with the AP. "A bear is chasing you. You've just been in a car wreck. You just got caught speeding, and a cop is giving you a ticket."
    For the 47-year-old man whose esophagus was damaged, though, ingesting the pepper burger was less a bear chase and closer to an attack. As physicians at the University of California at San Francisco reported in the case study, he consumed the burger and attempted to quench the heat in his mouth with six glasses of water. When that failed the man began to vomit, which gave way to abdominal pain. He dialed emergency help.
    At the emergency department, he received Maalox and painkillers. After his condition worsened, doctors moved him to the operating room, where they discovered a "2.5-cm tear in the distal esophagus," about one inch, as the case report authors noted. The force of the vomiting and retching led to a rare diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome; these spontaneous tears in the esophagus can be fatal if they are not diagnosed and treated.
    In this case, surgeons were able to repair the man's throat. "He remained intubated until hospital day 14, began tolerating liquids on hospital day 17," they wrote, "and was discharged home with a gastric tube in place on hospital day 23."
    The researchers concluded the case study with a warning.
    "Food challenges have become common among social media, including the infamous cinnamon challenge," they wrote, referencing the spice fad that was popular in early 2012. (When eating a heaping spoonful of cinnamon went wrong, it led to emergency calls and at least one collapsed lung.)
    "This case serves as an important reminder of a potentially life-threatening surgical emergency that was initially interpreted as discomfort after a large spicy meal."
    Brutal. If it does this to your throat, imagine what the next day would be like.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #54
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    Slightly OT

    ...but hardcore nonetheless.

    LOOK: Brave contestants try to eat as many chillies as possible while bathing in bowl of pepper juice
    BY ALEX LINDER IN NEWS ON AUG 14, 2017 5:05 PM



    What better way to celebrate the summer than by chowing down on some red hot chili peppers while basking inside a giant bowl of murky pepper juice?






    That appears to be the logic some foodies used when joining an unusual competition in Hunan's Ningxiang county over the weekend in which they put their taste buds and pain tolerance to the test.





    continued next post
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  10. #55
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    Continued from previous post

    In the end, the winner managed to gulp down 15 chilies in just one minute.






    While winning the competition may have given the guy the title of China's "Chili King," we all know who that really is.



    [Images via NetEase / ChinaNews]
    Pepper oil can cause skin burns (which is why it can hurt on the way out the next day). This seems really ill-advised to me.
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  11. #56
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    Bumper harvest!

    There's an embedded vid if you want to see that aerial view.
    Sea of red as China’s chilli heartland celebrates a bumper harvest
    Aerial footage shows vast swathes of land in the west covered with peppers as farmers collect hundreds of thousands of tonnes
    PUBLISHED : Thursday, 12 October, 2017, 4:30pm
    UPDATED : Thursday, 12 October, 2017, 4:30pm



    Alice Yan

    Aerial footage shows off a sea of red across the far west of China as local chilli farmers celebrate a bumper autumn harvest.

    Xinjiang is one of China’s major chilli growing areas, with a total planting area of 40,000 hectares.
    Its annual production of 250,000 tonnes of dried chillies accounts for one fifth of the national total production, according to China Central Television.
    Local cuisine makes the most of the region’s bounty, with signature dishes that include the hot and peppery dapanji, or “big plate chicken”.
    This spicy stew is made with chicken, chillies and potatoes, with hand-pulled noodles added to the remaining gravy midway through the meal.
    One of the biggest chilli production bases is Anjihai Town, nicknamed China’s chilli hometown, which produces around 25,000 tonnes of chilli by itself.
    Drone footage showed long lines of harvested chilli peppers laid out of the ground around Anjihai.
    From the ground the sea of red appeared to stretch as far as the eye could see.


    Farmers built a Communist Party flag out of their crop. Photo: CNR

    One group of local farmers used some of the chillies to form a Communist Party flag that measured 35 metres long and 19 metres wide – which was only a small part of the total area covered by the harvest.
    Farmers said the chilli industry was helping to improve their standard of living.
    “We planted 3.3 hectares of chillies this year, and we had a good harvest.
    “Total returns are expected to amount to 170,000 to 180,000 yuan (US$25,800-27,300),” said Zhao Lihong, a chilli grower from Anjihai, told CCTV.

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  12. #57
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    Slightly OT

    WTH? First a ketchup package, now a pepper? Clearly some people just never learned how to eat properly.

    Chinese woman discovers she had chilli pepper stuck in her lung for six years
    Woman unaware of the cause of her fevers and breathing problems until a full hospital check-up, Chinese newspaper reports
    PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 09 January, 2018, 4:05pm
    UPDATED : Tuesday, 09 January, 2018, 4:05pm



    Catherine Wong
    http://www.twitter.com/catherinewongbj
    catherine.wong@scmp.com

    A woman who suffered from fevers and breathing problems for six years discovered she had swallowed a 3cm-long chilli pepper which was lodged in one of her lungs, according to a newspaper report.

    The cause of the woman’s ailments finally came to light after she went for a check-up at a hospital in Tongchuan in Shaanxi province, the China Business View reported.

    The woman, 41, whose full name was not given, went to hospital last week after experiencing severe headaches and breathing difficulties.

    Luo Lifeng, a doctor at the hospital, was quoted as saying he tried to take the chilli out of her right lung after putting a probe inside.

    Chinese woman in hospital with stomach ache after she swallows spoon while eating noodles

    He then decided he would have to operate instead as the lower part of the lung was already severely infected. Doctors successfully removed the chilli pepper last week, according to the article.

    Doctors said swallowed foreign bodies in the airways were common in children aged under five, but rare in adults.

    Luo was quoted as saying the woman probably inhaled the pepper while she was eating a meal.
    Gene Ching
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  13. #58

    Song Zuying - Spice Girl



    宋祖英《辣妹子》清晰版MTV

    Song Zuying, China's premier Soprano is a high ranking member of the Communist Party! Watch your step comrade.



    《辣妹子》 Spice Girl

    A fun and popular folk song

    辣妹子辣辣妹子辣......................She is hot, she is hot,
    辣妹子辣妹子辣辣辣....................She is hot, she’s hot hot hot,
    辣妹子从小辣不怕......................Born a Fearless Girl,
    辣妹子长大不怕辣......................Become a Fearsome Woman
    辣妹子嫁人怕不辣......................Only afraid of a passionless love,
    吊一串辣椒碰嘴巴......................If you play with this pepper you're going to get burned,
    辣妹子从来辣不怕......................She has never feared spice,
    辣妹子生性不怕辣......................She was born to love spice,
    辣妹子出门怕不辣......................She was only ever afraid of going out with no spice,
    抓一把辣椒会说话......................Pluck up your courage if you dare speak in her presence,
    辣妹子辣妹子辣妹子....................She is hot, she is hot,
    辣妹子辣妹子辣妹子哟..................She is hot, she is hot, yo.
    辣妹子说话泼辣辣.......................Her words are sharp,
    辣妹子做事泼辣辣.......................Her actions bold,
    辣妹子待人热辣辣.......................She will welcome you warmly,
    辣椒帮她走天下..........................Chilli gives the spice of life,
    辣出汗来汗也辣呀汗也辣................She sweats chilli, sweats chilli ,
    辣出泪来泪也辣呀泪也辣................She cries chilli, cries chilli,
    辣出火来火也辣呀火也辣................She spits fire, and the fire is hot,
    辣出歌来歌也辣 歌也辣.................She sings of chilli, the song is hot!


    The song describes a (泼辣) bold and vivacious woman; strong is mind, spirit and deed (从小...不怕). She exudes (出汗) a passion that spreads beyond herself; others caught in her path cannot but be overtaken by it. At the end of the song, 汗、泪 and even 火 are more akin to the English “blood, sweat and tears.” There’s fire in her blood; it moves her--unconditionally--to be a force of passion in the normally drab world of our, under heaven (天下)


    Unknown Chinese Spice Girl 2016


    Name:  unknown spice girl.jpg
Views: 89
Size:  42.2 KB
    Last edited by wolfen; 01-20-2018 at 09:12 AM.
    "顺其自然"

  14. #59

    Letting it be known....

    Greetings,

    It is because of the Kung Fu Magazine Forum that I tried Sriracha Hot Chili Sauce. Though my mouth did not catch on fire it was an interesting take on chili sauce. I was not expecting the sweetness. Though I would prefer more spice than sweetness, that is just me. I would say that Sriracha pretty much stands on its own and I really appreciate the experience.

    mickey

  15. #60
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    Man Sent to ER After Eating World’s Hottest Pepper

    Gene Ching
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