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Thread: Boxing vs. Kung-Fu and other Asian MA's

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Iron_Eagle_76 View Post
    I don't think anyone with street fighting or ring fighting experience thinks that a street fight is going to go on length wise like a prize fight does, but your body holds up to the amount of training you have done.

    If a runner is training for a 5 mile marathon, he runs 10 miles.

    If a swimmer competes by doing 15 laps, they practice doing 30 laps.

    Better conditioning most always determines the outcome, no matter if it's a 25 minute combat sport match or a 30 second street fight.

    Most instructors who tell people this are fat f**ks who can't walk a set of stairs with out getting winded!
    Not really. I'll share another story. This is a true story.

    There was an inmate at the prison where I used to work, he was in his mid 50's, was over weight and out of shape, but he was a boxer in his youth. He was noted for never losing a prison fight no matter the age or fitness of his opponents. These were prison streetfights, BTW, not sanctioned boxing bouts. He was also noted for knocking out his opponents.

    After one particular knockout a work buddy of mine, who trains in Aikido, asked him how it was he always knocked out these younger more fit guys. The old guy said he just covered and took his hits until the punks gave him an opening, then he would hit them in the temple or on the chin, knockng them out.

    Your response is the response of a novice. You may be physically skilled, or not, but you are a novice when it comes to strategy and tactics.

    It doesn't always take fitness or a wide variety of skill, it takes patience and intelligence too. This is how old guys embarrass young guys.

  2. #17
    I like training. I train to have decent endurance, I train to apply things I find useful or fun, I try to train to improve by seeing what better fighters than me from any style or venue. That said, that level has almost nothing to do with self defense situations. I've yet to see a self defense scenario that came down to endurance, in bouncing, or in my younger days where half the people I knew were dealing drugs and ending up in stupid stuff. Never once did endurance play even the slightest role.

    More often than not, the person able to take a hit won, or the person who struck first, or struck first most effectively, so working technique is obviously useful. But for self defense, the main advantage for endurance is running, imo.

    Training for self defense is boring and training for mostly the least qualified opponents.

  3. #18
    35 years ago I knew a guy who took a baseball bat to the back of his head, he turned around, took the bat away from his assailant, and taught him what's what!

    Many martial artists suffer from too much martial arts experience and not enough real life experience.

    I love these guys who think that us older guys are all fat. We'll see which ones can keep up with us when they reach our ages, LOL!

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott R. Brown View Post
    Not really. I'll share another story. This is a true story.

    There was an inmate at the prison where I used to work, he was in his mid 50's, was over weight and out of shape, but he was a boxer in his youth. He was noted for never losing a prison fight no matter the age or fitness of his opponents. These were prison streetfights, BTW, not sanctioned boxing bouts. He was also noted for knocking out his opponents.

    After one particular knockout a work buddy of mine, who trains in Aikido, asked him how it was he always knocked out these younger more fit guys. The old guy said he just covered and took his hits until the punks gave him an opening, then he would hit them in the temple or on the chin, knockng them out.

    Your response is the response of a novice. You may be physically skilled, or not, but you are a novice when it comes to strategy and tactics.

    It doesn't always take fitness or a wide variety of skill, it takes patience and intelligence too. This is how old guys embarrass young guys.
    Cool story, Bro!! I'll stick with what I know works, thanks for caring.
    "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". -Cus D'Amato

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Iron_Eagle_76 View Post
    Cool story, Bro!! I'll stick with what I know works, thanks for caring.
    Fair enough, so did the old boxer. That's the way it should be, just stay open-minded to ideas you may have never considered. You never know when it might be useful.

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott R. Brown View Post
    35 years ago I knew a guy who took a baseball bat to the back of his head, he turned around, took the bat away from his assailant, and taught him what's what!

    Many martial artists suffer from too much martial arts experience and not enough real life experience.

    I love these guys who think that us older guys are all fat. We'll see which ones can keep up with us when they reach our ages, LOL!
    My best friend's father, an unathletic overweight older man, was once in a situation where a younger man came out of his car, angry over being yelled at for being a bad driver, and approached him with a baseball bat. My friend's father said, "Son, if you need a baseball bat to beat me up, you've got real problems." The guy went right back to his car.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Faux Newbie View Post
    My best friend's father, an unathletic overweight older man, was once in a situation where a younger man came out of his car, angry over being yelled at for being a bad driver, and approached him with a baseball bat. My friend's father said, "Son, if you need a baseball bat to beat me up, you've got real problems." The guy went right back to his car.
    LOL, Great story! Sometimes that's all it takes, strategy and tactics.

    I taught my, somewhat wimpy, nephew to deal with his high school bullies using self-deprecating humor. It worked the first time he tried it, and no one got hurt. It also tends to make the bullies into friends, which ends the bullying.

  8. #23
    But if we all know conflict management, we lose any hope of heroic action fights involving butterfly knives!

    At least we still have the internet.

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Faux Newbie View Post
    But if we all know conflict management, we lose any hope of heroic action fights involving butterfly knives!

    At least we still have the internet.
    And computer games, LOL!

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snipsky View Post
    what's your point?
    Excellent OP , gunbeat, great perspective, I think we can all agree from a non kungfu practitioner against kungfu fighters.
    sounds about right although some TCMA styles are more deceptive than others.
    Last edited by PalmStriker; 10-31-2013 at 07:40 PM.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Snipsky View Post
    what's your point?
    We going to spar girl? I'm still waiting.

  12. #27
    Speaking of the power of kung fu kicks mentioned by the OP, that they weren't held back(so probably things like crescents, round kicks), I've found that what usually limits the power is striking with the wrong surface. People tend to use the length of the sole of the foot on certain kicks that actually use the heel. And certain kicks are really meant for in close against targets on or below the knee, and often assume that you've forced the opponent's weight on that knee.

  13. #28
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    He gone bye bye.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by PalmStriker View Post
    He gone bye bye.
    Who has? Snipsky?

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faux Newbie View Post
    I like training. I train to have decent endurance, I train to apply things I find useful or fun, I try to train to improve by seeing what better fighters than me from any style or venue. That said, that level has almost nothing to do with self defense situations. I've yet to see a self defense scenario that came down to endurance, in bouncing, or in my younger days where half the people I knew were dealing drugs and ending up in stupid stuff. Never once did endurance play even the slightest role.

    More often than not, the person able to take a hit won, or the person who struck first, or struck first most effectively, so working technique is obviously useful. But for self defense, the main advantage for endurance is running, imo.

    Training for self defense is boring and training for mostly the least qualified opponents.
    So what your saying is that the person who does not train hard, spar hard for multiple rounds, strength train, ect. it going to be better equipped to take a hit, strike first, and strike most effectively as opposed to someone who trains all these things on a regular basis

    Intelligence and more so Experience is what will trump youth and strength. That being said, the person who is intelligent, has experience, and still trains at a high level is where it is. No substitution for proper training, none.
    "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". -Cus D'Amato

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