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Thread: Jade Egg

  1. #16
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    Continued from previous post

    A

    This is the most common question I get—no, it can’t get lost, but these ones have a hole drilled in them, which you can then thread with unwaxed floss, to make it easier to take out, and to generally ease any anxiety about it—which, I’ll tell you, a lot of people have!

    Q

    Are there people who shouldn’t use jade eggs?

    A

    If you’re on your cycle, don’t use it. If you’re pregnant or use an IUD, it’s super-important to check with your doctor before you use one. Some people say it can be useful in preparing for childbirth, but again, definitely consult a doctor in that situation.

    Q

    There are specifications about where the egg needs to be from, how it’s been treated—can you explain a bit about that?

    A

    The most important thing, just like when you’re buying a crystal, is to be careful where you get it from. Nephrite is a specific type of jade—it’s the most powerful, the most clearing, the traditional one used by women in ancient China, and the best to start with. It comes from Canada or sometimes Australia, and it’s a darker jade, deep green, almost black. The egg will get lighter in color, with use; if you feel like it’s been drained of energy, recharge it in the full moon just the way you would a crystal.

    Nephrite jade is associated with cleansing, health, abundance, beauty, longevity, and healing for the heart. Really insist on nephrite jade—there are a lot of imposters and weird stuff on the internet that isn’t even actually jade.

    The other egg people will use is rose quartz, which is more gentle, and brings in more love energy. But the jade is the most powerfully cleansing; go with the jade first, always. Then when you’re more practiced, you can use rose quartz to bring in love and heal wounds, in a gentler way.


    Shiva Rose
    JADE EGG
    $66.00
    Yoni eggs, once the strictly guarded secret of Chinese concubines and royalty in antiquity, harness the power of energy work, crystal healing, and a Kegel-like physical practice. Jade eggs’ power to cleanse and clear make them ideal for detox, too. “This particular jade, nephrite jade, has incredible clearing, cleansing powers,” says Shiva Rose; “It’s a dark, deep green and heavy—it’s a great stone for taking away negativity—and it’s definitely the one to start with.” (Read the whole story—plus a Q&A with Shiva Rose herself—here.) Fans say regular use increases chi, orgasms, vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and feminine energy in general. Shiva Rose has been practicing with them for about seven years, and raves about the results; we tried them, too, and were so convinced we put them into the goop shop.

    Please be sure to follow the instructions included with your egg.
    Jade
    Width: 1.2"; Height: 1.7"


    Shiva Rose
    ROSE QUARTZ EGG
    $55.00
    Yoni eggs, once the strictly guarded secret of Chinese concubines and royalty in antiquity, harness the power of energy work, crystal healing, and a Kegel-like physical practice. This rose quartz egg, like an energy-clearing magic crystal, is ideal for people who’ve seen results with the Jade Egg and want to take their practice a step further. Rose quartz “brings in love energy,” says Shiva Rose; “you can use rose quartz to bring in love and heal wounds, in a gentler way.” (Read the whole story—plus a Q&A with Shiva Rose herself—here.) Fans say regular use increases chi, orgasms, vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and feminine energy in general. Shiva Rose has been practicing with them for about seven years, and raves about the results; we tried them, too, and were so convinced we put them into the goop shop.

    Please be sure to follow the instructions included with your egg.
    Rose quartz
    Width: 1.2"; Height: 1.7"

    More on Gwyneth here: Gwyneth & Moon Juice Sex Dust
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    This just popped up on Gwyneth Paltrow's popular Women's site GOOP
    Eeesh.... airy fairy mystical woowoo for the hooha.

    People sure love to attribute stuff to magic.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    This just popped up on Gwyneth Paltrow's popular Women's site GOOP.

    [...] a lot of women (including me, originally) are doing kegels wrong: It turns out you can overdo it and the Kegels can end up working in reverse! So the idea with the jade egg and Kegels is you need a rest period. You tighten your muscles, of course, but the key is, you then have to relax, fully. In the West, we often have that more-is-more attitude, and we end up not taking the breath we need between the Kegels.
    The problem people have with every type of kf

  4. #19
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    A rebuttal

    Dear Gwyneth Paltrow, I’m a GYN and your vaginal jade eggs are a bad idea
    POSTED BY DR. JEN GUNTER ⋅ JANUARY 17, 2017 ⋅ 37 COMMENTS
    Dear Ms. Paltrow,

    I’ve been reading all about the jade eggs you are selling on GOOP for $55-66 a pop and the corresponding interview with a jade egg enthusiast. I have tried not to respond to this hot mess, after all a man who leers at naked 15 year-olds and brags about sexual assault is about to assume the highest office in the land. Quite frankly women have more compelling health interests right now, however, I have been asked by so many people about your vaginal rocks that I felt it necessary to drop you a line.

    I read the post on GOOP and all I can tell you is it is the biggest load of garbage I have read on your site since vaginal steaming. It’s even worse than claiming bras cause cancer. But hey, you aren’t one to let facts get in the way of profiting from snake oil.

    My issue begins with the very start of your post on jade eggs specifically that “queens and concubines used them to stay in shape for emperors.” Nothing says female empowerment more than the only reason to do this is for your man! And then the claim that they can balance hormones is, quite simply, biologically impossible. Pelvic floor exercises can help with incontinence and even give stronger orgasms for some women, but they cannot change hormones. As for female energy? I’m a gynecologist and I don’t know what that is!? How does one test for it? Organically sourced, fair trade urine pH sticks coming soon to GOOP for $77 I presume?



    If the word for womb is yoni I hate to break it to you, but the uterus and vagina are different structures. If you are using the Sanskrit, while I admit I am no language scholar, it seems that yoni means the entire female reproductive tract and you should say that. Terminology aside, the vulva, vagina, cervix, and uterus are not intuition repositories and neither are they sources of “power” or “wisdom.” If fact, I find that assertion insulting. Do you really mean a woman who does not have a uterus is less effective? Is a woman without a vagina less intelligent? Is a woman who had a vulvectomy due to cancer less creative?

    As for the recommendation that women sleep with a jade egg in their vaginas I would like to point out that jade is porous which could allow bacteria to get inside and so the egg could act like a fomite. This is not good, in case you were wondering. It could be a risk factor for bacterial vaginosis or even the potentially deadly toxic shock syndrome.

    Regarding the suggestion to wear the jade egg while walking around, well, I would like to point out that your pelvic floor muscles are not meant to contract continuously. In fact, it is quite difficult to isolate your pelvic floor while walking so many women could actually clench other muscles to keep the egg inside. It is possible the pained expression of clenching your butt all day could be what is leading people to stare, not some energy glow.

    Overenthusiastic Kegel exercises or incorrectly done Kegel exercises are a cause of pelvic pain and pain with sex in my practice. Imagine how your biceps muscle (and then your shoulders and then your back) might feel if you walked around all day flexed holding a barbell? Right, now imagine your pelvic floor muscles doing this.

    For women who want to use a device to help with Kegel exercises I suggest using weights made with medical grade silicone or plastic and to not wear them for long periods of time. Kegel exercises are not just about the contraction, the relaxation phase is just as important.

    The only thing your post got right is to check with your doctor before using one. So let me give you some free advice, don’t use vaginal jade eggs.

    Until next time,

    Jen

    'Overenthusiastic Kegel' is a great name for an emo band.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #20
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    Some good points in the rebuttal, though perhaps too dismissive of hormonal effects.

    Arousal, rate of arousal, and orgasm all have effects on hormones including dopamine, oxytocin, and prolactin levels.

    Dopamine is a motivator, and some may describe the effects as feeling more energized to do whatever is triggering the dopamine release.

    Taoist "essence" retention for males avoids prolactin release and refractory period and keeps dopamine levels from dropping off. Easy to see how people come to associate losing "essence" with losing energy, and the converse.

    Neurochemistry and physiology are real. No need to invoke new age mystical attempts to explain experiences.

  6. #21
    Greetings,

    It is most unfortunate that a GYN would choose to singlehandedly address this issue instead of bringing for a team of practicing gynecologists for a rebuttal. That would be more attention getting.

    The type of infection associated with the use of the jade egg also exist with the use of those purse carried vibrating devices. Gee, the doctor completely overlooked that.

    Safer use of both aforementioned devices for short periods of Kegel exercise or for those lunch break pleasures would be to slip either object inside a condom before using. This reduces bacterial contamination significantly.

    mickey

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by -N- View Post
    Some good points in the rebuttal, though perhaps too dismissive of hormonal effects.

    Arousal, rate of arousal, and orgasm all have effects on hormones including dopamine, oxytocin, and prolactin levels.

    Dopamine is a motivator, and some may describe the effects as feeling more energized to do whatever is triggering the dopamine release.

    Taoist "essence" retention for males avoids prolactin release and refractory period and keeps dopamine levels from dropping off. Easy to see how people come to associate losing "essence" with losing energy, and the converse.

    Neurochemistry and physiology are real. No need to invoke new age mystical attempts to explain experiences.
    Hi -N-,

    I agree with you. The way that the training of the Jade Egg method is being pushed is not about improving overall health. It is more about being a sexual dynamo by bringing more pleasure to your mate. Jade Egg training should actually feel good to the practitioner during her session and for long afterwards. In my opinion, to get the most from such training, one should have a good foundational meditation practice. She should also understand the points of correspondence inside the vagina to the rest of her body. While jade is good, one may want to have an egg made from quartz crystal to optimize the results from the training sessions. Though the Jade Egg training has been degraded to a physical practice, it's alchemical component can still be found, as suggested here in brief (and I am no authority). I consider the lack of decent info offered about that aspect to be disrespectful and controlling to a woman's spiritual growth potential.

    mickey
    Last edited by mickey; 01-19-2017 at 01:30 PM.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    Though the Jade Egg training has been degraded to a physical practice [...]
    Just like so many other things that get reduced to the superficial and obvious at expense of more subtle aspects.

  9. #24
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    Terminology aside, the vulva, vagina, cervix, and uterus are not intuition repositories and neither are they sources of “power” or “wisdom.”
    Actually they ARE sources of power especially over men's wisdom, and women intuitively know how to use it to their advantage.

  10. #25
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    Just out of curiosity, do any of you have vaginas?

    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    It is most unfortunate that a GYN would choose to singlehandedly address this issue instead of bringing for a team of practicing gynecologists for a rebuttal.
    Here you go mickey.

    Gwyneth Paltrow's Jade Eggs Are a Bunch of Baloney
    By Sara G. Miller, Staff Writer | January 19, 2017 02:10pm ET


    Gwyneth Paltrow in Los Angeles on Dec. 8, 2015.
    Credit: Featureflash Photo Agency/Shutterstock.com

    Move over, vaginal steaming: Actress Gwyneth Paltrow is suggesting an alleged new way to boost your reproductive health: a "jade egg" that's inserted into the vagina. The eggs are currently sold out on Paltrow's website, goop.

    But similar to the response to another one of Paltrow's health recommendations — that women squat over a bowl of steaming water and herbs, to steam clean the uterus — her new suggestion that women hold a 1- to 2-inch egg made out of jade in their vaginas for extended periods of time has been criticized by health experts.

    The eggs are said to "harness the power of energy work, crystal healing, and a Kegel-like physical practice. Fans say regular use increases chi, orgasms, vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and feminine energy in general," a contributor wrote in a recent post on goop.

    Gynecologists, however, are less enthusiastic about the jade eggs' purported healing powers. [7 Facts Women (And Men) Should Know About the Vagina]

    "There are no studies or evidence to show that jade eggs help with orgasms, vaginal muscle tone or hormonal balance," said Dr. Leena Nathan, an assistant clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UCLA Health in Los Angeles.

    "Jade does not result in hormonal changes, even when inserted in the vagina," Nathan said.

    Indeed, as with vaginal steaming, there is no evidence that jade eggs have any benefit for women or reproductive health, Nathan told Live Science.

    [IMG]http://www.livescience.com/images/i/000/088/941/original/jade-eggs.jpg?1484853168?interpolation=lanczos-none&downsize=*:1400[/IMG]

    And although there is evidence to support doing Kegel exercises, because the pelvic floor muscle-strengthening exercises can help women with urinary incontinence, Nathan noted that the jade egg still misses the mark.

    "Holding the jade egg in the vagina does require the same muscle contraction that a woman would perform with a Kegel exercise" in order to keep the egg in place," she said. However, "a woman would need to perform a constant Kegel, which would not be comfortable or advisable," she added.

    Dr. Jen Gunter, an OB-GYN based in San Francisco, agreed. "Regarding the suggestion to wear the jade egg while walking around, well, I would like to point out that your pelvic floor muscles are not meant to contract continuously," Gunter wrote in a blog post on Jan. 17. "Overenthusiastic Kegel exercises or incorrectly done Kegel exercises are a cause of pelvic pain and pain with sex in [women I see in] my practice," she added.

    In addition, the actual jade may pose a problem for health.

    Because jade is a porous material, it could act as a breeding ground for infection, Nathan said. The egg is a foreign body that could alter the bacteria and the pH of the vagina, "resulting in infections such as bacterial vaginosis, or even toxic shock syndrome if left in for too long," she said.

    Nathan said she would advise women who are interested in using a jade egg "to save her money and see a great pelvic floor therapist instead if she needs help with pelvic floor strengthening."

    Originally published on Live Science.
    And here's the bottom line:
    Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop Shop Has Sold Out of Its Jade Vagina Eggs
    Written by KALEIGH ROGERS
    STAFF WRITER
    January 19, 2017 // 02:47 PM EST

    Taking inspiration from “Chinese concubines and royalty in antiquity,” Gwyneth Paltrow’s new-age “health” brand Goop recently started hawking $66 egg-shaped lumps of jade designed to be inserted in the vagina. And as of Thursday afternoon, they’re sold out.



    Goop claims the eggs, when inserted in the vagina and worn daily, work to “increase chi, orgasms, vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and feminine energy in general.” The idea is similar to doing kegels—exercises that strengthen the pelvic floor muscles—but with the addition of a weight. Plus, like, the power of crystals or something.

    The chi/energy/feminine power nonsense is not based in any science, but is there anything wrong with using a weight to add some extra oomph to your kegels? Well, when they’re jade eggs, there is actually, according to Dr. Jennifer Gunter, an OB/GYN. Gunter wrote on her blog that because jade is porous, it could house bacteria, which could lead to infection or even toxic shock syndrome. And overdoing it on kegels can cause pain or damage to your muscle, Gunter wrote.

    But apparently enough customers were convinced to buy into Paltrow’s latest health hoax and sell out of the eggs. Hopefully Goop’s next product has antibacterial “properties” to help fight off the bouts of bacterial vaginosis.
    Maybe we should carry these at www.MartialArtsMart.com.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Here you go mickey.



    And here's the bottom line:


    Maybe we should carry these at www.MartialArtsMart.com.
    That article was weak: an investigative report that questioned 2 doctors Leena Nathan and Jen Gunther. There is no team, here.

    As for your question, I do not need to be born with a vagina to enjoy one. It is what God created bibs for.

    mickey

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    As for your question, I do not need to be born with a vagina to enjoy one.
    We all started with the the same parts embryologically.

    https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/e...ifferentiation

    And neurobiology is not all that different.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK11157/

    And the neurochemistry part.

    http://www.neuroquantology.com/index...ewFile/662/600

  13. #28
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    This is trending. srlsy.

    I heard chatter on this over the local radio station on my morning commute today. Now I see it's made the Washington Post, which I've posted below - it's mostly a recap though.

    No, Gwyneth Paltrow, women should not put jade eggs in their vaginas, gynecologist says
    By Kristine Guerra January 22


    Gwyneth Paltrow attends the goop pop Dallas Launch Party in Highland Park Village on November 20, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Layne Murdoch Jr./Getty Images for goop)

    It wasn't that long ago when Gwyneth Paltrow raved about the benefits of vaginal steaming, a non-scientifically proven process of sitting over a hot pot of water filled with herbs for up to 45 minutes to “cleanse your uterus” and “balance female hormone levels,” as the actress had put it.

    Most recently, Paltrow's lifestyle website Goop, which promoted vaginal steaming, is at it again with another advice for women: putting a jade egg — yes, a solid object about the size of a golf ball — in your vagina, and keeping it there all day or while you're sleeping.

    For $66 a piece, the jade eggs, once “the strictly guarded secret” of Chinese queens and concubines to please their emperors, would help boost your orgasm and “increase vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and feminine energy in general,” reads the beginning of an article titled “Better Sex: Jade Eggs for Your Yoni.”

    But a California gynecologist wasted no time letting Paltrow — and the rest of the world — know what she thinks of those jade eggs, which, according to the website, are already sold out.

    Dr. Jen Gunter, an OB/GYN for Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco, called the idea “the biggest load of garbage” she's read on Goop since vaginal steaming and worse than saying wearing bras is linked to cancer.

    Gunter first took issue with the article's introduction.

    “Nothing says female empowerment more than the only reason to do this is for your man!” she wrote in a seething blog post addressed to Paltrow. “And then the claim that they can balance hormones, is quite simply, biologically impossible...As for female energy? I'm a gynecologist and I don't know what that is!?”

    Gunter also talked about the potential health risks.

    Jade is porous, she said, so leaving the egg in one's vagina during sleep “could allow bacteria to get inside” and cause bacterial vaginosis or even Toxic Shock Syndrome, a life-threatening complication caused by bacterial infections.

    “This is not good, in case you are wondering,” Gunter wrote.

    Walking around with it inside is another bad idea, she said.

    “I would like to point out that your pelvic floor muscles are not meant to contract continuously,” Gunter wrote. “In fact, it is quite difficult to isolate your pelvic floor while walking so many women could actually clench other muscles to keep the egg inside.”

    Goop has not responded to a request for comment from The Washington Post.

    The rest of the Goop article is a question-and-answer write-up with Shiva Rose, an actress and beauty guru who said she's been using jade eggs for years. Rose said using jade eggs enhances not only your libido, but also your physical appearance.

    “And, this is weird one, but I sometimes feel people are more attracted to you when you're carrying a jade egg,” she said. “My 20-year-old daughter was joking about it one day, we were walking down the street and she was like, 'Mom, are you wearing a jade egg?'”

    The eggs also create kidney strength, Rose claimed. And jade, as a gem, is a “powerful” material that “takes away negativity and cleanses.”

    At the end of the article is a disclaimer saying the views of the author “do not necessarily represent the views of Goop, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners.”

    “The article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice,” the disclaimer states.

    Gunter's blog post, written on Tuesday, has been viewed about 600,000 times, she wrote in another post Friday.

    Another doctor has debunked claims about what jade eggs can supposedly do.

    “There are no studies or evidence to show that jade eggs help with orgasms, vaginal muscle tone or hormonal balance,” Dr. Leena Nathan, an assistant clinic professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UCLA Health, told Fox News. “Jade does not result in hormonal changes even when inserted in the vagina.”

    Paltrow, a cookbook author who's been described as a lifestyle guru, launched Goop in the fall of 2008 out of her kitchen as a weekly newsletter. It has since evolved into a lifestyle website offering style tips, recipes and its own line of organic skin-care products. Paltrow also uses the website to give suggestions to readers about where to shop and eat.

    Goop has promoted other eye-rolling ideas, like a $15,000 gold ***** and some sex dust to add to your smoothie.

    Aside from vaginal steaming, another phrase, conscious uncoupling, was largely unknown to many until Paltrow used it. In 2014, she and Chris Martin announced their divorce through a post on Goop titled “Conscious Uncoupling,” which in the simplest term, means divorce without the nastiness.

    In 2015, the multimillionaire mom made unflattering headlines when she accepted a challenge to live on a food stamp budget — and failed after only four days.

    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    That article was weak: an investigative report that questioned 2 doctors Leena Nathan and Jen Gunther. There is no team, here.
    Dude, we are in the era of retweets and alternative facts. And you want an investigative team here? For this?

    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    As for your question, I do not need to be born with a vagina to enjoy one. It is what God created bibs for.
    Fair point, but I was more interested to see if anyone here actually tried this. There is history to Jade Egg here prior to Goop. I guess that goes with the bibs, huh?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Fair point, but I was more interested to see if anyone here actually tried this.
    I expect that it is analogous to developing awareness and relaxed control for nonejaculatory male multiple orgasm. (As opposed to the brute force "overenthusiastic kegels" that some do)

    I could see the egg as a tool for helping women become more aware and in tune with their bits.

  15. #30
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    Doctors warn against Gwyneth Paltrow's advice on vaginal jade eggs

    from http://www.cbsnews.com/news/gwyneth-...ctors-warning/

    Doctors warn against Gwyneth Paltrow's advice on vaginal jade eggs

    Gwyneth Paltrow is at it again. The actress and founder of the lifestyle publication Goop is no stranger to doling out controversial and unproven health advice. In the past, her site has touted the benefits of vaginal steaming to “cleanse” the uterus and told readers that wearing bras causes cancer. In both instances, experts were quick to point out that there is no scientific evidence to back up those claims.

    Now, Paltrow has some new advice to women: put jade eggs in your vagina for “better sex” and “overall well-being.”

    In a post titled “Better Sex: Jade Eggs for Your Yoni,” Goop informs readers that jade eggs were used by “queens and concubines… to stay in shape for emperors” and are “ideal for detox.”

    “Fans say regular use increases chi, orgasms, vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and feminine energy in general,” the post continues.

    The eggs sell for $66 and are currently sold out, according to the Goop website.

    But doctors are warning that the health claims Paltrow’s site are making are unsubstantiated and the eggs may even pose some health risks.

    Bad celebrity health advice
    “I read the post on GOOP and all I can tell you is it is the biggest load of garbage I have read on your site since vaginal steaming,” Dr. Jen Gunter wrote in a scathing open letter to Paltrow.

    Gunter, who is an OB-GYN for Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco, also says the claim that the jade eggs can balance hormones is “quite simply, biologically impossible.”

    “Pelvic floor exercises can help with incontinence and even give stronger orgasms for some women, but they cannot change hormones,” she continues. “As for female energy? I’m a gynecologist and I don’t know what that is!?”

    Gunter also emphasizes the potential health risks associated with the vaginal use of jade eggs.

    “As for the recommendation that women sleep with a jade egg in their vaginas I would like to point out that jade is porous which could allow bacteria to get inside and so the egg could act like a fomite” — an object capable of harboring or transmitting an infectious agent. This, she writes, “could be a risk factor for bacterial vaginosis or even the potentially deadly toxic shock syndrome.”

    Dr. Christine Greves, an obstetrician and gynecologist at the Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies at Orlando Health, points out that there is no scientific evidence that would lead her to believe that these eggs are either safe or effective for women.

    “Given that these jade eggs are not FDA-approved and there are no medical studies that can support [these claims] I could not recommend this to any of my patients,” she told CBS News.

    Greves also notes that “detoxing” the vagina – whether that’s by douching or other means – is not needed or recommended.

    “If a woman has certain complaints with her vagina, there is a foul smell or she has abnormal discharge, she needs to see a doctor because she may have an infection that needs treatment,” she said.

    The article on Goop’s does contain a disclaimer at the end, stating:

    The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of goop, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.

    Experts urge all women to consult with their doctor before using such products or if they are having difficulties with sex.

    “If a woman is needing assistance with orgasm, see your doctor and ask questions,” Greves said. “A provider can help you figure out what is causing the difficulty and help you come up with some safe alternatives.”

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