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Thread: No Kung Fu in a Fight Video Yet

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Kellen Bassette View Post
    Why would anyone start a fake Kung Fu school with the sole purpose of training kick boxers under a false premise? Why wouldn't they just start a kick boxing school?
    Do you realize how absurd that sounds?
    pssttttt.... over here

    come closer....

    over here

    you do realize

    he's

    a troll.....
    Chan Tai San Book at https://www.createspace.com/4891253

    Quote Originally Posted by taai gihk yahn View Post
    well, like LKFMDC - he's a genuine Kung Fu Hero™
    Quote Originally Posted by Taixuquan99 View Post
    As much as I get annoyed when it gets derailed by the array of strange angry people that hover around him like moths, his good posts are some of my favorites.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kellen Bassette View Post
    I think he goes into a cave to meditate and recharge his chi...and bite the heads off of bats, of course....

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Kellen Bassette View Post
    Why would anyone start a fake Kung Fu school with the sole purpose of training kick boxers under a false premise? Why wouldn't they just start a kick boxing school?
    Do you realize how absurd that sounds?
    you got a point there.

    It won’t look like a kung fu movie that is for sure but lot of the principles and techniques learned in traditional kung fu can be used in kickboxing type sparring or competing. I have been training at a thaiboixing school for the last few months doing a lot of sparring. Some techniques I use often that come directly from kung fu. first is a move I learned from Bok Mei a long time ago. You start out in a right foot forward fighting stance and drop levels into a short horse stance and fire a mid level right hand strike to your opponent's stomach. Just used this one last week against one of the new teachers from Thailand. Another technique that seems to work well is a move from the shaolin xiao hong quan form, where you kind of cup deflect the punch then follow through with either a lead or rear punch of your own. I find this works well when the same hand [lead hand] does the deflection block into a jab. Rooting , sticking neutralizing also used often in sparring. But known of these methods or techniques would be recognizable as a distinct kung fu method in sparring.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by KungFuTruth View Post
    I see the Kung Fu Magazine forum only has fake martial artists and forum trolls.
    How excellent of you to say so, sir! They may laugh at you now, trampling upon your open-minded questions, but in a few years they'll think back and respect you and be grateful that you held up the mirror of truth and forced them to drinketh deeply of it..

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by lkfmdc View Post
    pssttttt.... over here

    come closer....

    over here

    you do realize

    he's

    a troll.....
    yeah yeah....I just couldn't believe everyone left that out while calling him on his other nonsense...I felt like someone should do it.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by wiz cool c View Post
    you got a point there.

    It won’t look like a kung fu movie that is for sure but lot of the principles and techniques learned in traditional kung fu can be used in kickboxing type sparring or competing. I have been training at a thaiboixing school for the last few months doing a lot of sparring. Some techniques I use often that come directly from kung fu. first is a move I learned from Bok Mei a long time ago. You start out in a right foot forward fighting stance and drop levels into a short horse stance and fire a mid level right hand strike to your opponent's stomach. Just used this one last week against one of the new teachers from Thailand. Another technique that seems to work well is a move from the shaolin xiao hong quan form, where you kind of cup deflect the punch then follow through with either a lead or rear punch of your own. I find this works well when the same hand [lead hand] does the deflection block into a jab. Rooting , sticking neutralizing also used often in sparring. But known of these methods or techniques would be recognizable as a distinct kung fu method in sparring.
    Yeah the people I know and train with talk a lot about this stuff...I'm actually convinced Muay Boran is related to TCMA. A lot of people disagree, but for me, there's too much in common with old gong fu and the poems seem so similar. I think all the southeast kickboxing styles are the same art, with just slight regional variations, cultural influences....seems like the same root is apparent in Muay Thai, Muay Lao, Lethwai, Kun Khmer...off topic but this tread deserves hijacking anyway...
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kellen Bassette View Post
    Yeah the people I know and train with talk a lot about this stuff...I'm actually convinced Muay Boran is related to TCMA. A lot of people disagree, but for me, there's too much in common with old gong fu and the poems seem so similar. I think all the southeast kickboxing styles are the same art, with just slight regional variations, cultural influences....seems like the same root is apparent in Muay Thai, Muay Lao, Lethwai, Kun Khmer...off topic but this tread deserves hijacking anyway...
    I think you are right about this, that is at least the sense of it i have gotten when looking at those styles & comparing- just regional differences, old cultural and modern cultural influences pushing the traditional arts in different directions, etc.

  7. #22
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    Old Thaiboxing in my Thaiboxing Manual looks like old Kung Fu before Western Boxing was added to Thaiboxing in maybe the 1920 s. Also India s martial arts systems might have had some influence on those arts Thaiboxing , Burmese Boxing maybe Thaing and Bando to.

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Firehawk4 View Post
    Old Thaiboxing in my Thaiboxing Manual looks like old Kung Fu before Western Boxing was added to Thaiboxing in maybe the 1920 s. Also India s martial arts systems might have had some influence on those arts Thaiboxing , Burmese Boxing maybe Thaing and Bando to.
    A lot of people credit the southeast Asian MA's as originating from Indian MA's, but I think a lot of that may have to do with Indian influence on the languages/writing and Indian style art portraying Muay. I certainly could be wrong, but I don't pay too much attention to that, since I think it's likely that Muay Thai predated the Indian cultural influences and that stuff was probably added later, much like Buddhism was added into CMA's.

    There's no hard history for how old MT is, but it seems likely it is as old as Thailand, when you consider the fact that the Tai peoples originally came from China, it seems more likely that the art that eventually became the southeast Asian kickboxing method probably had it's origins in China.

    That being said, if I'm right, it almost certainly evolved over the centuries. I think the biggest differences between the Muay systems and the old Chinese systems is the detail and emphasis on the Thai clinch and the importance attributed to the round kick. Who knows if that was always an integral part of the style, or if it developed later?
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

  9. #24
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kellen Bassette View Post
    I think the biggest differences between the Muay systems and the old Chinese systems is the detail and emphasis on the Thai clinch and the importance attributed to the round kick. Who knows if that was always an integral part of the style, or if it developed later?
    There's an interesting comparison to Okinawan and Japanese karate. Like the Chinese methods they descended from, the old Okinawan methods did not have (or at least didn't emphasize) a roundhouse kick. From what I heard, the roundhouse kick was incorporated into Japanese karate by Gichin Funakoshi's son, Gigo, who was also responsible for widening/deepening the postures and movements into the characteristics of modern Shotokan sometime in the late 1930s. For free-sparring (which Gichin had disapproved of), the ball of foot front kick was favored, but sometimes it became easier to be blocked and to mangle one's own toes. So the roundhouse kick was developed as a variation of the front kick to go around the opponent's defenses at the time. And since TKD/TSD was originally Shotokan with some variations, this was also the basis of the roundhouse kick in KMA as well.

    It's interesting that in the last few decades, the roundhouse/round kick is the most commonly-seen kick in competitive fighting.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 11-01-2014 at 09:10 AM.

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    There's an interesting comparison to Okinawan and Japanese karate. Like the Chinese methods they descended from, the old Okinawan methods did not have (or at least didn't emphasize) a roundhouse kick. From what I heard, the roundhouse kick was incorporated into Japanese karate by Gichin Funakoshi's son, Gigo, who was also responsible for widening/deepening the postures and movements into the characteristics of modern Shotokan sometime in the late 1930s. For free-sparring (which Gichin had disapproved of), the ball of foot front kick was favored, but sometimes it became easier to be blocked and to mangle one's own toes. So the roundhouse kick was developed as a variation of the front kick to go around the opponent's defenses at the time. And since TKD/TSD was originally Shotokan with some variations, this was also the basis of the roundhouse kick in KMA as well.

    It's interesting that in the last few decades, the roundhouse/round kick is the most commonly-seen kick in competitive fighting.
    I think the round house that most CMA's have adopted in modern times is simply the borrowed TKD roundhouse. I also learned the round house with the ball of the foot in Go Ju Ryu. We called it an Okinawan round house. Still the Japanese Karate/Tae Kwon Do style roundhouse was used far more often.

    It would be interesting to know what TCMA styles did and did not have a round kick from the 19th Century and earlier; and what the specifics of the kick were. I did a thread on this subject a couple years ago.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

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