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Thread: Bruce Lee Statues

  1. #16
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    Continued from previous post

    Kogarah, NSW

    Revealed in 2011 in the town square, this 2-metre bronze statue was like a lightning rod for complaints from its unveiling. Kogarah, in the shadow of Sydney Airport in Australia, is a sister city with Shunde, China which boasts long-lost connections with Lee’s family. Shunde donated the statue to Kogarah and the Sydney suburb offered a boomerang and a rugby jersey in return. In the face of loud complaints, the local council was stuck between honouring its sister-city relationship with Shunde and appeasing the angry local residents who wanted someone more relevant to the area to be memorialised. The council found a solution by renaming a local park “Shunde Gardens”, putting Bruce Lee’s statue there and hoping for no more protests.

    WATCH: Kogarah’s local council unveils the statue of Bruce Lee
    Hmm, did they miss any?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  2. #17
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    ttt 4 2018!

    Who here has actually been to this statue? I was only in HK once and that was '91 before it was erected.

    Lee, Mui statues getting redesign
    Local | Cissy So 16 Mar 2018



    Bronze statues of superstars Bruce Lee Jun-fan, Anita Mui Yim-fong, and local cartoon character McDull will no longer be surrounded by mills barriers, as they will be relocated to the top of a water staircase.

    New World Development Co, who are responsible for the redecoration of the Avenue of Stars in Tsim Sha Tsui, unveiled the new design of the Lee and Mui statues at a meeting yesterday.

    Water staircases will serve as the base of the two-meter-high statues of the world-renowned martial arts actor, and the "Queen of Canto-pop."

    New World said Lee's statue will be etched with one of his prominent quotes: "Be Water, My Friend."

    As for Mui, her song, Life Written in Water, will be engraved.

    The velocity of both water staircases will be different, with the speed of Lee's staircase being faster as it corresponds to his lightning-quick martial arts moves. Mui's will be slower to create the effect of her standing on stage.

    The new design will also be beneficial for tourists, as it will allow them to get up close and personal with the two statues.

    Meanwhile, the handprint plaques of movie stars will be retained on the Avenue of Stars, where more than 107 handprints, including those of Tony Leung Chiu-wai and Chow Yun-fat will now be displayed on railings instead of the ground.

    Furthermore, information on the stars and film clips can be accessed via smartphones after scanning QR codes

    The Avenue of Stars is set to reopen in February 2019.

    Cissy So
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #18
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    Sf

    Why San Francisco needs a Bruce Lee statue now more than ever
    Jasmine Garnett
    July 1, 2020
    Updated: July 1, 2020 4 a.m.

    On June 18th, a city work crew quietly took down a statue of Christopher Columbus from near Coit Tower. It was a preemptive move from Mayor London Breed, who was responding to rumors that protesters would deface or topple the statue the next day. Statues of Junipero Serra, Francis Scott Key and Ulysses S. Grant were all felled in Golden Gate Park in the following days.

    With empty plinths now strewn across the city, the discussion has turned to which historical figures SF residents think deserve to have their likeness memorialized instead. Movie star Bruce Lee, who was born in San Francisco in 1940, is one of them.

    Jeff Chinn, a Bruce Lee memorabilia collector, helped create a commemorative plaque to mark Lee's birthplace in Chinatown's Chinese Hospital in 1998. "Quite a few statues have been forcefully taken down because of their racist history, and in my opinion, no one's going to touch and take down a Bruce Lee statue because Bruce Lee brought people together of all races," he said.

    Chinn recently contributed to the ESPN documentary Be Water - the first Bruce Lee documentary directed by an Asian American - that focuses on Bruce Lee's struggle against racism throughout his life. He said the documentary is helping people understand "that Bruce Lee was not just some two-bit Kung Fu star, but he was ahead of his time in more ways than one."


    Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

    On and off the screen, Lee fought to break stereotypes. "What Bruce Lee wanted to do was to create a heroic Asian male character," author of "Bruce Lee: A Life," Matthew Polly told NPR. "But it simply didn't exist. There were only two types of roles — Fu Manchu, the villain, and Charlie Chan, the model minority.”
    San Francisco resident Matt Tolosa, who recently called for a Bruce Lee statue on Facebook, has been looking for the martial artist to get more recognition in the city for a long time. He explained that, along with the release of Be Water and what would have been Lee’s 80th birthday in November, “It seemed more relevant now, with the discussion of who should get statues versus who shouldn’t, and what a statue represents.”


    Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images

    While the story that Wong Jack Man fought Bruce Lee in Oakland for teaching non-Chinese students Kung Fu might be more legend than history, in terms of race and gender, Lee’s early classes were indeed “groundbreaking” for how diverse they were. “He represents, I think, anti-racism,” said Bruce Lee historian and collector Steve Palmer. “He truly didn't care what race or ethnicity you were if you wanted to learn how to better yourself, how to improve yourself.”
    His struggle against Asian stereotypes in Hollywood is especially relevant now, with the coronavirus’ characterization as a “Chinese Virus” stoking anti-Asian xenophobia. When Buzz Patterson (a Republican running for a House seat in California) recently asked, “If Kung Flu is racist, does that make Bruce Lee and ‘kung fu’ movies racist?” Shannon Lee, Bruce Lee’s daughter responded by saying, “My father fought against racism in his movies. Like, literally.”
    For all of Bruce Lee’s accomplishments, it’s not commonly known that the icon was born in San Francisco. “Chinatown needs to get a statue, because he was born in San Francisco, and to tell you the truth, I would safely say half of the people who lived in Chinatown don't even know Bruce was born in San Francisco,” Chinn said.


    Getty Images

    The SF Art Commission, which is responsible for many of the city’s statues, said until now it’s been rare to represent an individual in San Francisco. “We’re going to find out,” Acting Information Officer Rachelle Axel said. “There have been very, very, very few depictions of particular individuals in our public art collection other than the Maya Angelou that we’re currently working on, and the City Hall busts.”

    Since the Columbus statue was taken down, the Arts Commission has received more than 250 emails advocating for various individuals to replace him – from AP Giannini to Nany Pelosi to an Ohlone leader, to yes, Bruce Lee, Axel said. But this is an entirely new situation the organization is facing, and they’re still at the point where they’re gathering information from around the city. “If I've gotten 200 emails, there's 210 opinions about what it should be.”
    Despite the challenges, many believe that the city where Bruce Lee was born should have a bigger monument to his legacy. “If you google ‘Bruce Lee Statue’ in San Francisco, a lot of people assume there's one there and there's not,” said Palmer. “Bruce has statues in Los Angeles, Hong Kong and even Mosar, Bosnia but nothing in the city of his birth.”
    Jasmine Garnett is a freelance writer from the Bay Area.
    Couldn't agree more.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #19
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    Sf

    Why San Francisco needs a Bruce Lee statue now more than ever
    Jasmine Garnett
    July 1, 2020
    On June 18th, a city work crew quietly took down a statue of Christopher Columbus from near Coit Tower. It was a preemptive move from Mayor London Breed, who was responding to rumors that protesters would deface or topple the statue the next day. Statues of Junipero Serra, Francis Scott Key and Ulysses S. Grant were all felled in Golden Gate Park in the following days.

    With empty plinths now strewn across the city, the discussion has turned to which historical figures SF residents think deserve to have their likeness memorialized instead. Movie star Bruce Lee, who was born in San Francisco in 1940, is one of them.

    Jeff Chinn, a Bruce Lee memorabilia collector, helped create a commemorative plaque to mark Lee's birthplace in Chinatown's Chinese Hospital in 1998. "Quite a few statues have been forcefully taken down because of their racist history, and in my opinion, no one's going to touch and take down a Bruce Lee statue because Bruce Lee brought people together of all races," he said.

    Chinn recently contributed to the ESPN documentary Be Water - the first Bruce Lee documentary directed by an Asian American - that focuses on Bruce Lee's struggle against racism throughout his life. He said the documentary is helping people understand "that Bruce Lee was not just some two-bit Kung Fu star, but he was ahead of his time in more ways than one."

    On and off the screen, Lee fought to break stereotypes. "What Bruce Lee wanted to do was to create a heroic Asian male character," author of "Bruce Lee: A Life," Matthew Polly told NPR. "But it simply didn't exist. There were only two types of roles - Fu Manchu, the villain, and Charlie Chan, the model minority." San Francisco resident Matt Tolosa, who recently called for a Bruce Lee statue on Facebook, has been looking for the martial artist to get more recognition in the city for a long time. He explained that, along with the release of Be Water and what would have been Lee's 80th birthday in November, "It seemed more relevant now, with the discussion of who should get statues versus who shouldn't, and what a statue represents."


    Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
    On and off the screen, Lee fought to break stereotypes. "What Bruce Lee wanted to do was to create a heroic Asian male character," author of "Bruce Lee: A Life," Matthew Polly told NPR. "But it simply didn't exist. There were only two types of roles — Fu Manchu, the villain, and Charlie Chan, the model minority.”

    San Francisco resident Matt Tolosa, who recently called for a Bruce Lee statue on Facebook, has been looking for the martial artist to get more recognition in the city for a long time. He explained that, along with the release of Be Water and what would have been Lee’s 80th birthday in November, “It seemed more relevant now, with the discussion of who should get statues versus who shouldn’t, and what a statue represents.”

    While the story that Wong Jack Man fought Bruce Lee in Oakland for teaching non-Chinese students Kung Fu might be more legend than history, in terms of race and gender, Lee's early classes were indeed "groundbreaking" for how diverse they were. "He represents, I think, anti-racism," said Bruce Lee historian and collector Steve Palmer. "He truly didn't care what race or ethnicity you were if you wanted to learn how to better yourself, how to improve yourself." His struggle against Asian stereotypes in Hollywood is especially relevant now, with the coronavirus' characterization as a "Chinese Virus" stoking anti-Asian xenophobia. When Buzz Patterson (a Republican running for a House seat in California) recently asked, "If Kung Flu is racist, does that make Bruce Lee and 'kung fu' movies racist?" Shannon Lee, Bruce Lee's daughter responded by saying, "My father fought against racism in his movies. Like, literally." For all of Bruce Lee's accomplishments, it's not commonly known that the icon was born in San Francisco. "Chinatown needs to get a statue, because he was born in San Francisco, and to tell you the truth, I would safely say half of the people who lived in Chinatown don't even know Bruce was born in San Francisco," Chinn said.


    Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images
    While the story that Wong Jack Man fought Bruce Lee in Oakland for teaching non-Chinese students Kung Fu might be more legend than history, in terms of race and gender, Lee’s early classes were indeed “groundbreaking” for how diverse they were. “He represents, I think, anti-racism,” said Bruce Lee historian and collector Steve Palmer. “He truly didn't care what race or ethnicity you were if you wanted to learn how to better yourself, how to improve yourself.”

    His struggle against Asian stereotypes in Hollywood is especially relevant now, with the coronavirus’ characterization as a “Chinese Virus” stoking anti-Asian xenophobia. When Buzz Patterson (a Republican running for a House seat in California) recently asked, “If Kung Flu is racist, does that make Bruce Lee and ‘kung fu’ movies racist?” Shannon Lee, Bruce Lee’s daughter responded by saying, “My father fought against racism in his movies. Like, literally.”

    For all of Bruce Lee’s accomplishments, it’s not commonly known that the icon was born in San Francisco. “Chinatown needs to get a statue, because he was born in San Francisco, and to tell you the truth, I would safely say half of the people who lived in Chinatown don't even know Bruce was born in San Francisco,” Chinn said.

    The SF Art Commission, which is responsible for many of the city's statues, said until now it's been rare to represent an individual in San Francisco. "We're going to find out," Acting Information Officer Rachelle Axel said. "There have been very, very, very few depictions of particular individuals in our public art collection other than the Maya Angelou that we're currently working on, and the City Hall busts." Since the Columbus statue was taken down, the Arts Commission has received more than 250 emails advocating for various individuals to replace him - from AP Giannini to Nany Pelosi to an Ohlone leader, to yes, Bruce Lee, Axel said. But this is an entirely new situation the organization is facing, and they're still at the point where they're gathering information from around the city. "If I've gotten 200 emails, there's 210 opinions about what it should be." Despite the challenges, many believe that the city where Bruce Lee was born should have a bigger monument to his legacy. "If you google 'Bruce Lee Statue' in San Francisco, a lot of people assume there's one there and there's not," said Palmer. "Bruce has statues in Los Angeles, Hong Kong and even Mosar, Bosnia but nothing in the city of his birth." Jasmine Garnett is a freelance writer from the Bay Area.


    Getty Images
    The SF Art Commission, which is responsible for many of the city’s statues, said until now it’s been rare to represent an individual in San Francisco. “We’re going to find out,” Acting Information Officer Rachelle Axel said. “There have been very, very, very few depictions of particular individuals in our public art collection other than the Maya Angelou that we’re currently working on, and the City Hall busts.”

    Since the Columbus statue was taken down, the Arts Commission has received more than 250 emails advocating for various individuals to replace him – from AP Giannini to Nany Pelosi to an Ohlone leader, to yes, Bruce Lee, Axel said. But this is an entirely new situation the organization is facing, and they’re still at the point where they’re gathering information from around the city. “If I've gotten 200 emails, there's 210 opinions about what it should be.”

    Despite the challenges, many believe that the city where Bruce Lee was born should have a bigger monument to his legacy. “If you google ‘Bruce Lee Statue’ in San Francisco, a lot of people assume there's one there and there's not,” said Palmer. “Bruce has statues in Los Angeles, Hong Kong and even Mosar, Bosnia but nothing in the city of his birth.”

    Jasmine Garnett is a freelance writer from the Bay Area.
    yaaaaaaaaassss!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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