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Thread: Physical shape masters

  1. #1
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    Physical shape masters

    I have noticed that in general guys become heavier or fat as they get older and it seems that Masters in kung fu are not the exception. Very few I see keep in shape, lean bodies and no belly. The majority I've seen and now more from videos you find in the internet. Aren't masters supposed to have good diets, being flexible and being in great shape. If I look at pictures from Lam Jo, hungkyun southern style, he lasted hundred and compared to many he was in good shape. I know, I will hear it is also genes related but still the majority I see out there are out of shape, fat or big belly. What's your take on this?

    Mig

  2. #2
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    Most people gain weight as they get older, period. That's because there is a point where you can no longer train to the same degree. How many people, do you think, can train the same degree in their 60s and 70s that they did in their 20s and 30s? There may be a rare exception here and there of a 60-something who can out-train athletic, hard-working, talented 20-somethings. Even then, I think if they're honest about it, such a rare exception would admit he can't train as much/as hard as he did in his 20s/30s.

    The body changes as you get older. Injuries can take a toll, too, which can also affect your motivation to train as much. If you're young you may not think so, but it will happen to you, too. Look at most former pro athletes such as boxers, etc. Take George Foreman...he still looks great in his 60s, but he can't and doesn't look like he did in 1973. Few ex-fighters his age have aged so gracefully. Look at most retired pro wrestlers, who tend to become fat, even though they worked their @sses off and were "ripped" in their prime. i've noticed karate men in particular, including most of the famous ones, gain lots of weight as they age. Moreso than kung fu men.

    I had gained over 30 pounds the last few years due partly to getting older, but mostly due to an injury that affects my ability to train as much as I'd like to. In 8 months, I lost over 30 pounds (from 196 to 164), and am back down to my ideal weight, where I plan to stay. In fact, I plan to drop down a bit lower. It takes willpower and determination. And more self-discipline than before. If you like to eat, guess what? As you get older, you'll have to eat less, because your metabolism slows as you age. Slower metabolism/less rigorous activity/same eating habits=gaining weight. Those who never gain weight tend to be those who naturally eat small amounts.

    This doesn't even take into account that most 20-somethings have/have had fewer responsibilities in life besides training.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 05-02-2015 at 09:11 AM.

  3. #3
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    The reason why I posted is watching so many masters being in pretty bad shape and very few in good shape. It seems to be an eating disorder and having the means to pay for more food. I would have thought that those masters knew better TCM, neigong or else. Today, people our age close to 60 or older have more choices to learn and keep active and in good shape. I am more interested in how those who are in good shape made it such as Lalanne, Jhoon Rhee, Hee Il Cho, Wallace, Joe Lewis just to name a few of them.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    most people gain weight as they get older, period. That's because there is a point where you can no longer train to the same degree. How many people, do you think, can train the same degree in their 60s and 70s that they did in their 20s and 30s? There may be a rare exception here and there of a 60-something who can out-train athletic, hard-working, talented 20-somethings. Even then, i think if they're honest about it, such a rare exception would admit he can't train as much/as hard as he did in his 20s/30s.

    The body changes as you get older. Injuries can take a toll, too, which can also affect your motivation to train as much. If you're young you may not think so, but it will happen to you, too. Look at most former pro athletes such as boxers, etc. Take george foreman...he still looks great in his 60s, but he can't and doesn't look like he did in 1973. Few ex-fighters his age have aged so gracefully. Look at most retired pro wrestlers, who tend to become fat, even though they worked their @sses off and were "ripped" in their prime. I've noticed karate men in particular, including most of the famous ones, gain lots of weight as they age. Moreso than kung fu men.

    I had gained over 30 pounds the last few years due partly to getting older, but mostly due to an injury that affects my ability to train as much as i'd like to. In 8 months, i lost over 30 pounds (from 196 to 164), and am back down to my ideal weight, where i plan to stay. In fact, i plan to drop down a bit lower. It takes willpower and determination. And more self-discipline than before. If you like to eat, guess what? As you get older, you'll have to eat less, because your metabolism slows as you age. Slower metabolism/less rigorous activity/same eating habits=gaining weight. Those who never gain weight tend to be those who naturally eat small amounts.

    This doesn't even take into account that most 20-somethings have/have had fewer responsibilities in life besides training.
    yep !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  5. #5
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    Genetics certainly play a role but I think for the most part being able to identify and adapt to your bodies changing needs as we get older is the true deciding factor. Diet , in most cases , needs a regular adjustment, as does our exercise routine. In my observation most of the elder martial artists I've met and learned from that also maintained physically, stressed the importance of identifying and addressing this balance.
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  6. #6
    if you are a professional kung fu guy you have zero excuse to be out of shape. that job is like most relaxing job in the world.

    25th generation inner door disciple of Chen Style Practical Wombat Method
    Officially certified by Ethiopian Orthodox patriarch Abune Mathias
    grandmaster instructor of Wombat Combat™®LLC Practical Wombat Method. international academy retreat

  7. #7
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    Lol too true!
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bawang View Post
    if you are a professional kung fu guy you have zero excuse to be out of shape. that job is like most relaxing job in the world.
    I agree with this if kung fu (or any MA) is your profession. Luckily for me, I have a profession and it's not MA. As I've said, I've seen more obese karate guys (Kenpo gut) than any other arts.

    I'll be turning 52 in a few days, and my own current training is 2 hours/day, 4 days/week. Hard enough, but not like I could go pre-injury. That's not an excuse. If you don't have any nagging injuries, congratulations. Throughout the years, I've known hundreds of people who quit MA cold turkey for a lot less than that. IMO, this injury has renewed my determination to get back to 100%. This shows who is really dedicated or not. Anybody can be 'dedicated' when they're at 100% with no challenges like injuries to deal with/work around.

    It's also true *some* teachers become fat due to sheer laziness. Some (or a lot) of them become complacent.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 05-02-2015 at 06:41 PM.

  9. #9
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    Interesting that most of everyone talks about genetics, exercises, body type whereas the root of many of the problems as we age is nutrition, life style and knowing ourselves to find that famous balance. I didn't realize I am getting older until recently as my joints are weaker and easy to get injured. Self realization of how we destroy ourselves with bad foods and over doing or hurting ourselves. Sort of masochist mechanism then we accept that we will suffer until we die. What strikes me is that those who said were masters and got fat, were not masters, just were good physically to perform period. Let's see how do you think you keep yourself fit as you grow older?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by mig View Post
    Let's see how do you think you keep yourself fit as you grow older?
    That is a good question. There are tons of ways to achieve fitness if one knows his end goal. Then the most important aspect is sticking to it. Most do not stick with things long enough to achieve their goals. It may not be because they give up but that they change their minds about what they want after starting. The primary reason most never become great I'd suggest. A fault I myself am not immune to.

  11. #11
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    My first teacher's advice still resonates to this day. ' you need to eat like you want to live' this bit of basic advice is the root of good health. What we consume is not food. It is energy. Clean energy in proper proportion is key to maintaining any form of life. The better the source, the better the results. The proof is as simple as observing nature around us.
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucas View Post
    My first teacher's advice still resonates to this day. ' you need to eat like you want to live' this bit of basic advice is the root of good health. What we consume is not food. It is energy. Clean energy in proper proportion is key to maintaining any form of life. The better the source, the better the results. The proof is as simple as observing nature around us.
    I would say the food transformed into energy. I am not quite sure I understand about the concept of clean energy. One thing I am finding out is that not necessarily the clean energy as every body is developed differently. Some have organs stronger than others therefore the more we destroy ourselves the worst it becomes as we get older. Unfortunately, as we get older is when we realize what we need to learn to age fit and in good health. Little we know how our bodies work and little we do to take care about our internal organs. So much literature, so much theories that one can get lost easily. I started to believe that finding the right nutrients is one of the factors to keep that energy ongoing and luckily today we can follow up with blood test, urine and stool labs, etc. For those over 50-60 how do you keep in shape practicing MA and the nutrition that had helped you to keep stronger and alive.

  13. #13
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    For those of you who have not reached the age of sixty yet: As you approach 60, say 57 0r so, your muscles will start going through a slackening effect and will not be able to "pad" your skeletal frame as you were used to up till that time. Sitting will be a bit uncomfortable and holding your arms/elbows on your thighs while sitting will also take some getting used to as your skin/muscle tissue will roll as opposed to being firmly held in place connected to bone. My summer "fighting weight" for agility was always 185lbs. Winter weight up to 200lbs. In order for me to feel comfortable again at 63 with my skeletal frame not being a real noticeable dis-comfortable reality zone I have put on an extra 10 lbs which means I am 25 lbs heavier than I used to be for working out, etc. This is OK though as the trade-off has allowed me some extra strength due to increase in size. I figure in time the extra pounds should distribute more evenly across the board as I maintain this new weight class. *note: After 60 I would advise to not put too much force into your practice strikes as your muscles can not handle that like they once did. Better to have them undamaged if you need them in a pinch. ( The tiger is still a tiger even if it grows up in captivity). Healing takes 'o so much longer, be prepared.

  14. #14
    Greetings,

    PalmStriker:

    You should be banned for simply taking the time to scare the living sh!t out of people.

    BANN IM!!!! BANN IZZ AZZ!! BANN IZZ AZZ NOW!!!


    mickey

  15. #15
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    LOL! Just thought I'd clue you yung'uns in on the reality circuit. Spent my early days studying Indian Vedic literature and living like a monk for a number of years for the body transcendence understanding. That said, you may not want to get too attached to the "quantum display" of the unfolding Universe, ha! Not to worry, though, we're all in for the same ride. Enjoy! https://www.google.com/search?q=Budd...w&ved=0CEgQsAQ
    Last edited by PalmStriker; 05-05-2015 at 08:38 PM.

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