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Thread: Favorite 3 BSL Sets

  1. #1

    Favorite 3 BSL Sets

    For all the BSL practitioners on the board, what are the 3 most important sets in your opinion? And why? I am referring to Gu Ru Zhang (Ku Yu Cheung)'s 10 Shaolin sets. Seems like #6 would definitely be up there in terms of popularity.

  2. #2
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    #6 is usually taught first...

    ...so it is that precedence that gives it such popularity, not so much a measure of favoritism.

    Just for archival sake for this topic, here is the index of BSL forms.

    Personally, I don't really have a favorite. In general, I attempt not to play favorites. But that's my own personal idiosyncrasy. Please don't let that hamper further discussion of this thread topic.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #3
    The reason I ask is that Adam Hsu took what he learned from Sifu Han Qing Tang and condensed into a 3 tier curriculum- beginner, middle, advanced. I admire what he did.

    Jiao Men Chang Quan
    - Tan Tui
    - Pao Quan
    - Cha Quan

    Mei Hua Chang Quan
    - Mai Fu
    - Shi Zi Tang
    - Tai Zu Chang Quan

    If you could pick 3 sets from the 10, with each form having a clear progression and purpose, which would you choose?

  4. #4
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    I know Wing Lam taught them all out of order too.

    Which really makes you wonder why they are numbered the way they are...
    It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand. - Apache Proverb

  5. #5
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    It is the order of practice, not the order of learning.

    When the BSL 10 are complete, they are meant to be practiced in order from 1 to 10. They are taught in the order of simplest to the most complex. The simpler sets are in the middle, the first five (4-8) as we used to call them at Lam Kwoon. They are shorter and sort of like wind sprints in the middle of the work out. #1 has all of the kicks, in order to get your legs warm. #2 & #3 are long and complex. The final #9 and #10 are the most sophisticated, left for the end of practice. That's the simple version, but I'm sure you get the idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by taichi4eva View Post
    If you could pick 3 sets from the 10, with each form having a clear progression and purpose, which would you choose?
    Okay, that's a different question. I would go with #5, #1 & #10. That would be for teaching order. In practice, it would be 1 -> 5 -> 10.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #6
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    Good to know Gene.

    I have considered getting some of the BSL videos for exercise purposes. I am a tightwad though
    It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand. - Apache Proverb

  7. #7
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    When I lived in Taiwan, I studied Changquan (Northern Long Fist) for a couple years. One of the styles of it was Cha Chuan (Zhaquan), a.k.a., Jiaomen Changquan (Islamic Long Fist). Besides 10 Roads Tan Tui, of that style, I only learned 2 of the sets:

    Si Lu Zhaquan (#4 road)
    Wu Lu Zhaquan (#5 road)

    I read somewhere that very few Zhaquan practitioners, even masters, have all 10 Zhaquan sets. Also, Zhaquan is actually not Bei Shaolin, since its roots are Hui (a Chinese Muslim group), not Buddhist.

    I also trained some Mei Hua Long Fist.

    On a side note, Long Fist in general is considered an ideal base from which to study other northern systems. I personally never warmed to Northern Long Fist, although I found the sets/techniques fairly easy to do at the time. Many of the Long Fist teachers de-emphasized the application aspect. Nonetheless, I still have a healthy respect for the combative roots of Long Fist.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 04-12-2015 at 09:55 AM.

  8. #8
    learning multiple forms really started in qing dynasty because the boxing ban caused multiple lineages to shrink down to one person

    a kung fu style usually has a mother fist form that all the lineages share and the rest unique forms are redundant

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    ...so it is that precedence that gives it such popularity, not so much a measure of favoritism.

    Just for archival sake for this topic, here is the index of BSL forms.

    Personally, I don't really have a favorite. In general, I attempt not to play favorites. But that's my own personal idiosyncrasy. Please don't let that hamper further discussion of this thread topic.
    Come on, Moi Fah and Bot Bo are the obvious ones!
    Tan Tui with those and that's my favourite three.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

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