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Thread: Qigong Challenges & Stunts

  1. #31
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    Police Special Response Team demo


    Special response team of police put on astounding show of strength

    By Ngoc Thanh April 17, 2019 | 08:11 am GMT+7 They use ancient techniques to smash rocks on their body and prevent sharp objects from penetrating their body.



    The 45th anniversary of the mobile police force was recently celebrated by its officers with an incredible exhibition of qigong and other physical skills.

    Lying on broken glass when a rock on one’s abdomen is being smashed with sledgehammers is a feat that requires using qigong techniques to prevent penetration by the glass pieces not to speak of withstanding the blows.


    The head is a vulnerable part of the body. However, through rigorous training, an officer manages to withstand the blow of a sledgehammer to break bricks stacked on his head.


    An officer drops a knife on a colleague. It is is a dangerous exercise but useful in the force since officers sometimes come up against criminals with sharp pointed objects.


    Another test of strength where a officer uses his neck to bend and straighten an iron rod.


    An officer breaks wooden staffs with his body.


    An officer uses qigong techniques and weak pulses in his body called acupoints to twist an iron bar with his eye.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  2. #32
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    Continued from previous post


    An officer places an iron bar against his larynx and pushes a 4.2-ton van with it.


    Another uses his abdominal muscles to pull a van.


    This officer holds a sword against his neck while pulling a 12-seat, 4-ton vehicle.


    Using bare hand to break the bottom of a plastic bottle takes practice.


    An officer carries 80 kg with his teeth while standing barefoot on broken glass.
    THREADS
    Qigong Challenges & Stunts

    Real Life application of Martial Arts to Police, Security, Etc work
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #33
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    Zhang Yilong

    That's one way to water the plants! Chinese kung fu master inhales liquid through his nose and squirts it out from a tear gland in his eye
    Eye-watering video shows martial arts specialist spraying water from his eye
    After inhaling a glass of milk, he can also write Chinese characters on paper
    Zhang Yilong from central China's Henan province has been training for 10 years
    He warned the audience not to copy him as the stunts are very dangerous
    By KELSEY CHENG FOR MAILONLINE

    PUBLISHED: 07:03 EDT, 23 April 2019 | UPDATED: 07:07 EDT, 23 April 2019

    A kung fu master in China has showed off his unusual way of watering the flowers and practicing Chinese calligraphy - with one of his eyes.

    Zhang Yilong, a martial arts specialist from Xinxiang, Henan province, has learned the 'ancient art' of squirting water and milk from his right eye.

    Footage of the eye-watering stunt shows the kung fu master inhaling water through his nose and spraying it from a tear gland towards a pot of flowers.


    Eye-watering footage of the stunt shows the kung fu master inhaling water through his nose and spraying it from a tear gland in his right eye towards a pot of flowers


    Zhang Yilong, a martial arts specialist from Xinxiang, Henan province has learned the 'ancient art' of squirting water from his eye


    Before the stunt kung fu master Zhang Yilong is seen snorting water up his nasal cavity

    As if that wasn't impressive enough, Zhang then performed writing Chinese characters on a piece of paper after snorting a glass of milk up his nose.

    Zhang said he has been training to do the trick for the past 10 years and claims to be able to spray at a distance of up to 1.7 metres (5.5 feet).

    'At first, I couldn't snort the liquid up my nasal cavity. After some practice, I was able to transfer the liquid but failed to spray it through the tear gland,' he said.


    As if that wasn't impressive enough, Zhang then performed writing Chinese characters on a piece of paper after snorting a glass of milk up his nose


    Zhang said he has been training to do the trick for the past 10 years and claims to be able to spray at a distance of up to 1.7 metres (5.5 feet)


    Zhang warned the audience not to copy him as the stunts are very dangerous

    'I could only squeeze out a few drops of water. After several months, I could reach a distance of 10 cm (3.9 inches) to 20 cm (7.8 inches),' he added.

    Despite this, Zhang has a word of warning for those keen to follow in his footsteps.

    'I want to remind the audience not to emulate me,' Zhang said.

    'It's dangerous. I've been practising for more than ten years. Please don't imitate me, especially children,' he said.

    One witness said he was deeply impressed by the performance.

    'It's unimaginable to drink through the nose and to write out Chinese characters by the eyes. The kung fu master is awesome,' he said.
    Imagine the applications on the street...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #34
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    Kung fu master in China pulls two cars with one ear

    Gene Ching
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  5. #35
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    Here's a new one for me

    There's a vid behind the link.

    How does he do that? Kung fu fighter jumps on water in gravity-defying stunt
    Xiao Qiang from Chongqing, China, filmed himself performing a crazy stunt
    Mr Qiang used a basin filled with water on a bucket as an implausible trampoline
    The video shows the 28-year-old bouncing on the basin without getting wet
    By DARREN BOYLE FOR MAILONLINE
    PUBLISHED: 06:14 EST, 4 December 2019 | UPDATED: 06:17 EST, 4 December 2019

    This is the amazing moment a man from China performs a mind-bending stunt where he appears to be able to bounce on water.

    Xiao Qiang from Chongqing, which is around 900 miles from Beijing, jumped onto the basin of water which had been placed upon two buckets.

    Mr Qiang, 28, places his basin next to a wall for a second stunt and successfully bounces on the water before landing safely on the parapet.

    Mr Qiang has been learning martial arts for more than a decade which has helped him with his tricks.


    Xiao Qiang from Chongqing used his Kung Fu skills to leap onto a basin filled with water by two buckets. Amazingly the 28-year-old 'bounces' on the water


    Mr Qiang then repeated the trick near a wall, which he manages to land on the parapet
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  6. #36
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    Xiao Qiang explained

    This is basically what I thought was happening here. Nice to have it 'tracked'. Tech is so cool now.

    12.12.2019 10:00 AM
    A Kung Fu Master’s Leap Breaks the Internet—but Not Physics
    A viral video appears to show a man jumping off water. What’s really going on here?


    PHOTOGRAPH: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/GETTY IMAGES

    What would I do without internet videos? It's not just viral cat memes but also amazing humans like this guy, Xiao Qiang. In this short clip, the kung fu fighter appears to leap onto a bucket of water several feet off the ground—then bounce off the surface of the water like a trampoline. Whaaaat?

    It’s an illusion, of course, but one that is made possible only by awesome strength and athleticism. Even when you know how it’s done, it still looks cool. So I’ll give you a clue right up front: As he flies through the air, watch a spot around the middle of his body.

    Yep, once he pushes off the ground, his center of mass actually follows a normal parabolic trajectory. Just like when you toss a ball into the air, the only force acting on him at that point is the gravitational interaction with Earth. That means he has a constant downward acceleration, producing that familiar path. At this level, it’s normal projectile motion.

    But he’s not just a rigid ball; his body is still working as he moves through the air, and that’s where the magic happens. To sort it all out, I ran this clip through my Tracker video-analysis app.

    Plotting the Motion

    Usually when I do video analysis to track the motion of something through space, I graph vertical position in each frame as a function of time. But there’s a problem in this case. Someone clearly messed with the frame rate in this clip to highlight the “water jump” portion. That means we can’t get a stable time scale.

    Instead, how about we plot vertical position against horizontal position in each frame? If an object is moving through the air with only gravity acting on it, the horizontal velocity will be constant. This means we’ll still get a parabolic graph—it’s just a little harder to analyze.

    What I’ve done here is trace the movement of three different parts of his body: his head, his feet, and his center of mass. Normally the center of mass would be around a person’s belly, but it changes as you move your arms and legs up or down, so this is a rough estimate.


    So check it out: The center of mass (COM) follows the parabolic path we expect. But look at his feet. They reach the top and start moving down—then they bounce back up again, as if he really is jumping off the water. What’s really happening, as this graph shows, is that he’s pushing his feet hard away from his body near the top, then pulling them back up.


    Remember the "invisible box challenge” from a couple of years ago? This is basically the water version of that trick.

    Internal Forces

    But wait—can we model a crazy jump like this? Yes we can, because you don't really understand something till you can model it. Now, modeling a whole human body in motion is crazy complicated, so we’ll go real basic: just two moving parts—a head and some feet. I can represent these two parts as balls and then find the center of mass between them.

    Here’s what a jump might look like with a rigid body. I know, it’s impossible to jump with a rigid body, but just go with me here. The yellow ball is the head, the red ball is the feet, and the white ball represents the center of mass. Notice that everything moves in a parabolic trajectory. (Here’s the code for this animation if you want to see how it’s done.)


    ILLUSTRATION: RHETT ALLAIN

    Now, what if we want to move the feet down and up to make that crazy water-jump move? This is a little trickier. Remember, the only external force acting on the guy once he leaves the ground is gravity, so the center of mass of the head-feet system (also known as a person) has to follow a parabolic trajectory. What we need, then, is an internal force inside that system.

    Let me explain by starting with the momentum principle. This says that the net force on a system is equal to the rate of change of momentum. Like this:


    ILLUSTRATION: RHETT ALLAIN
    Unfortunately I can't cut&paste the graph or the vid. You'll just have to follow the link if you can't get it from the text.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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