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Thread: Ketchup

  1. #1
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    Ketchup

    This is an old Nat Geo article referenced by a current one that crossed my newsfeed over the weekend. I have mentioned that Ketchup was a Chinese invention, and been taken to task on it more than a few times. So I'm starting this here thread.


    PHOTOGRAPH BY JASMINE WIGGINS
    APRIL 21, 2014

    How Was Ketchup Invented?
    by Jasmine Wiggins

    It is a dynamic red concoction. At once savory and sweet, with just the right amount of puckering twang, it is slathered and squirted onto our favorite foods.

    Even the most barren of refrigerators has a lingering bottle that clatters with the whoosh of an opened door. It is the hero of American condiments: ketchup.

    In the U.S., 97 percent of households report having a bottle at the table. How did a simple sauce come to be so loved by America? It turns out ketchup’s origins are anything but American. Ketchup comes from the Hokkien Chinese word, kê-tsiap, the name of a sauce derived from fermented fish. It is believed that traders brought fish sauce from Vietnam to southeastern China.

    The British likely encountered ketchup in Southeast Asia, returned home, and tried to replicate the fermented dark sauce. This probably happened in the late 17th and early 18th centuries as evidenced by a recipe published in 1732 for “Ketchup in Paste,” by Richard Bradley, which referenced “Bencoulin in the East-Indies” as its origin. (See “How a Food Becomes Famous.”)

    But this was certainly not the ketchup we would recognize today. Most British recipes called for ingredients like mushrooms, walnuts, oysters, or anchovies in an effort to reproduce the savory tastes first encountered in Asia. Mushroom ketchup was even a purported favorite of Jane Austen. These early ketchups were mostly thin and dark, and were often added to soups, sauces, meat and fish. At this point, ketchup lacked one important ingredient.

    Enter the tomato. The first known published tomato ketchup recipe appeared in 1812, written by scientist and horticulturalist, James Mease, who referred to tomatoes as “love apples.” His recipe contained tomato pulp, spices, and brandy but lacked vinegar and sugar.

    Ketchup’s success was due in part because it could be kept for up to a year. Still, preservation of tomato ketchups proved challenging. Since tomato-growing season was short, makers of ketchup had to solve the problem of preserving tomato pulp year round. Some producers handled and stored the product so poorly that the resulting sauce contained contaminants like bacteria, spores, yeast, and mold—leading French cookbook author Pierre Blot to call commercial ketchup “filthy, decomposed and putrid” in 1866.

    Early investigations into commercial ketchup found that it contained potentially unsafe levels of preservatives, namely coal tar, which was sometimes added to achieve the a red color, and sodium benzoate, an additive that retarded spoilage. By the end of the 19th Century, benzoates were seen as particularly harmful to health. At the forefront of the war against them was one Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, who maintained that the use of these harmful preservatives was unnecessary if high quality ingredients were used and handled properly. (See “Chemicals Within Us.”)

    Wiley partnered with a Pittsburgh man named Henry J. Heinz who had started producing ketchup in 1876. Heinz was also convinced American consumers did not want chemicals in their ketchup. In answer to the benzoate controversy, Heinz developed a recipe that used ripe, red tomatoes—which have more of the natural preservative called pectin than the scraps other manufacturers used—and dramatically increased the amount of vinegar and to reduce risk of spoilage. Heinz began producing preservative-free ketchup, and soon dominated the market. In 1905, the company had sold five million bottles of ketchup.

    With the rise of commercial ketchup, recipes for the condiment slowly vanished from cookbooks. Home cooks found that homemade ketchup just didn’t taste “right.” This is not surprising. Americans now purchase 10 billion ounces of ketchup annually, which translates to roughly three bottles per person per year. If you can buy something delicious off the shelf, why on Earth would you attempt to make it?


    Photograph by Jasmine Wiggins

    Why not?

    Last year, during the final few, trailing days of summer, I was not quite done relishing tomatoes. I had twenty pounds of red fruit gleaming on my kitchen table. I canned most of them to use in sauces and soups for the winter, but I had an inkling to try something different. I started to think about ketchup as method of preservation just as Americans had considered the sauce in the 19th century.

    My friends thought I was crazy when I told them I was making ketchup. “You can’t do that!” one said. The flavors, he went on, were impossible to reproduce. There was a reason everyone bought commercial ketchup, he insisted, because any attempt to prepare a homemade version was futile. Fortunately, I love a challenge.

    One of the first recipes Henry Heinz used back in the day contained allspice, cloves, cayenne pepper, mace, and cinnamon. A second included pepper, ginger, mustard seed, celery salt, horseradish, and brown sugar. The recipe I tested includes similar ingredients. While I admit my end result tastes nothing like Heinz (that rich texture is hard to achieve), it is still quite delicious. More savory than sweet, it packs a bit of heat that mellows with time after canning.

    Today, the world of condiments is metamorphosing with the rise of alternative and artisanal ketchups and the ever-increasing popularity of my personal favorite condiment, Sriracha. Despite ketchup’s nearness to our hearts and all-American reputation, it is not even number one-selling condiment in America. What is? Mayonnaise.


    Photograph by Jasmine Wiggins

    Ketchup

    From: The Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You can Stop Buying & Start Making by Alana Chernila.

    Clarkson Potter/Publishers. Link

    Makes 4 cups

    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 cup diced onion (large)
    5 garlic cloves, minced
    6 pounds ripe tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and cored, or three 28-ounce cans tomatoes, drained
    3 teaspoons kosher salt, plus additional to taste
    1 tablespoon paprika
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
    1 tablespoon celery salt
    1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
    1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
    1 1/2 tablespoons chili powder, plus additional to taste
    1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
    1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
    1/4 cup distilled white vinegar
    1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar
    1 tablespoon honey

    1. Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute, while stirring.

    2. Add the tomatoes, salt, paprika, cinnamon, cloves, celery salt, cumin, dry mustard, chili powder, and ground pepper and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes.

    3. Blend until smooth with an immersion blender or transfer the mixture to an upright blender in two batches and puree until smooth. If transferred, return the mixture to the pot.

    4. Add vinegars, brown sugar, and honey. Cook over medium heat, uncovered, stirring often, until the ketchup thickens, about 30 minutes. Adjust salt, pepper, and chili powder to taste.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #2
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    This is so random

    The deadline blur has taken over my posting here.

    Inventor Loses Ketchup-Packet Patent in Battle With Heinz
    In fighting a patent infringement suit, Heinz requested review of Scott White’s claims


    A patent-infringement suit claimed that the removable cover on Heinz’s Dip & Squeeze ketchup packets was a rip-off of the ‘CondiCup.’ PHOTO: GENE J. PUSKAR/ASSOCIATED PRESS
    By JULIE JARGON Updated Feb. 19, 2016 8:36 p.m. ET

    A Chicago inventor Friday lost his patent on a ketchup packet following a years-long battle with ketchup maker Kraft Heinz Co.

    Scott White, a risk manager for the Chicago Housing Authority, claimed Heinz stole his patented idea for a flexible condiment package he called the “CondiCup” that would fit in a car’s drink holder and allow people to dip French fries and other finger foods. He said the product could help avoid the mess that traditional ketchup packets can make when fast-food customers try to open them while driving.

    Mr. White said he had pitched his idea to a Heinz executive who passed on the invention but that the company later came out with a package that contained similar elements. In 2012 he filed a patent-infringement suit against Heinz, claiming the removable cover on the company’s Dip & Squeeze ketchup packets was a rip-off of his.

    In fighting the infringement suit, Heinz requested that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office re-examine certain claims in Mr. White’s patent. In June 2013, the examiner at the patent office declared that many of Mr. White’s claims were too obvious to be patentable. Mr. White appealed, and Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s decision to cancel Mr. White’s patent.

    Mr. White referred a request for comment to his attorney, Keith Grady, in the St. Louis, Mo., office of the law firm Polsinelli. “We’re disappointed in the outcome,” Mr. Grady said, adding that Mr. White is in the process of determining whether to fight the finding by either requesting a rehearing with the federal circuit court or by petitioning the Supreme Court to hear the case.

    The patent-infringement case is stayed pending a final decision.

    “We are pleased with the decision as we have always maintained this case was groundless and without merit,” said a spokesman for Kraft Heinz.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #3
    Ketchup has always been a favorite in our household, my eldest child would put ketchup in almost anything they eat (weird). But now they like Sriracha more than Heinz ketchup. I think i would try the ketchup recipe one of these days.

  4. #4
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    Ok, I know we have some Canadians on this here board...

    ...is this really a thing up in the Great White North?

    The ketchup saga
    Imperfect information fuelled this social media uprising
    By Sylvain Charlebois
    Published: March 28, 2016


    French’s Ketchup has been a viral sensation, but how Canadian is it really? Photo: French's

    The politics of food distribution is alive and well, or so it would seem.

    Without notice, Loblaws decided to dump French’s Ketchup, causing a two-day viral backlash by the public. The pressure was so great that Loblaws actually reversed its decision, just a few days after making it.

    Many are speculating how unfair competitive practices amongst vendors could have had something to do with it. Finding any evidence of this is always challenging. But the ketchup story speaks to how the intricacies of food retailing are becoming more intertwined with unexpected social uprisings.

    The Leamington story is certainly at the epicentre of this recent unorganized rebellion against the food establishment. Heinz, a competitor to French’s, closed its Leamington, Ont. plant in June 2014. This put many employees out of work and caused several tomato farmers to wonder what to do next, as they were left without a customer.

    Highbury Canco, supported by local investors, eventually bought the plant and continued to pack some products under the Heinz label — but ketchup was not one of them.

    The American company French’s, mostly known for its mustard manufactured in the U.S., buys most of its mustard grains from Saskatchewan. French’s has not only expanded into the ketchup industry but it recently began using tomatoes from Leamington and processing them at the Leamington plant. Interesting strategy, but market access is key in processing.

    In Canada, given its market clout, Loblaws can make or break processing companies. Highbury Canco relied on a partnership with Loblaws to increase sales of French’s Ketchup and entice more tomato farmers to supply the plant, as it grew its market share. Loblaws’ decision to pull the product took the wind out of Highbury Canco’s sails.

    Most of the general public were unaware of this — until the news spread on social media. What was perceived as a rational and strategic corporate decision at the time by Loblaws caused Canadian consumers to support a company that champions local foods and jobs. By the time #FrenchsKetchup was the No. 1 Twitter handle on Tuesday, the battle suddenly ended with Loblaws’ decision to relist the product.

    Increasingly, the consumer is becoming the true CEO of the food supply chain. Empowered by social media, consumers are now prompting how food is produced, manufactured and distributed. In just a few hours, with absolute imperfect information, consumers reversed a well-considered decision made by the largest private employer in the country. It is not just about distribution, but rather about how any output is perceived by the marketplace. However, every now and then the “CEO” often shows signs of confusion which can cause concern for the future.

    In Loblaws’ defence, the grocery business is no easy affair. Consumers angered by Loblaws’ decision accused the grocery giant on social media of discriminating against Canadian farmers and processors. Yet this is not an entirely accurate picture.

    Loblaws’ strategic focus is certainly on its own private label, namely President’s Choice, one of Canada’s most trusted and valued brands. Unlike French’s, President’s Choice is Canadian. But most importantly, many of these products, including President’s Choice Ketchup, are made with Canadian-grown tomatoes and the condiment is processed here in Canada. The accusations against Loblaws of not supporting local farmers and processors are unfounded, as far as ketchup is concerned.

    In essence, it was David fighting Goliath with a bottle of homemade ketchup. David was clearly Leamington and the wonderful “rise from the ashes” project happening in the community. However, to pinpoint who played the role of Goliath in this case is unclear. It may have been Loblaws, or Kraft Heinz which may have played a role behind the scenes. Protecting real estate in the grocery business is key, and partnerships with important vendors can be critical to any grocer’s bottom line. For Loblaws, nurturing its relationship with Kraft Heinz makes perfect business sense. Conversely, in response to the market’s reaction, it also makes as much business sense for Loblaws to reverse its decision on French’s Ketchup.

    What needs to be underscored by the ketchup tale is the collectively recognized currency of locally processed food products. Safeguarding our food systems is not only about farming. It is also about how we add value to our own locally grown commodities.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #5
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    Yeah..well.
    Heinz closed a plant in Leamington Ontario.
    There were a lot of Tomato farmers in the area that had no where to sell their tomatoes.
    Then French's stepped in and bought the tomatoes for their ketchup plant in Ohio.

    Some guy then went on a rail about Heinz being jerks and how all of Canada should support French's because they bought the tomatoes.
    You'd think that would be the end of it, but no. For some reason, Canadian's got on board that Ketchup train especially after one of the major food stores here started to remove French's from it's stock in order to sell it's own in house brand. The protest saw that store (Loblaws) restock it's shelves and French's is now going to start making it's Ketchup in Canada. I don't know what will happen to the Ohio plant.

    It's on of those weird things that has you wonder what is up with what people fin important. there are hundreds of brands of ketchup after all.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  6. #6
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    I've always felt a bit grossed out by ketchup, particularly by the dregs of it that people leave on their plates, or what's left in and around the ketchup bottle as it starts becoming empty.

  7. #7
    Greetings,

    If you simply swab your crispy fry or coat your burger with some Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ Sauce, you will kiss your ketchup good bye.

    mickey

  8. #8

    Spelling,

    Greetings,

    Catsup, the other way of writing ketchup, is actually a lot closer to the Chinese pronunciation. Del Monte used to spell it this way and they had a superior product.

    mickey

  9. #9
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    A little dated but relevant...

    Condi-Bent Out of Shape
    Israel didn't ban the sale of Heinz brand ketchup; the country's Health Ministry just ruled that the company had to rebrand it as "tomato seasoning."
    Kim LaCapria Feb 18, 2016



    CLAIM: Israel has banned the sale of Heinz brand ketchup, partially due to the product's use of GMO-derived ingredients.

    MOSTLY FALSE
    WHAT'S TRUE: Rival ketchup manufacturer Osem successfully lobbied the Israeli government to mandate that Heinz be restricted from labeling its iconic product as "ketchup."

    WHAT'S FALSE: The sale of Heinz brand ketchup has been "banned" in Israel, and the product's use of GMO-derived ingredients was part of the reason behind that ban.

    EXAMPLE: [Collected via e-mail and Facebook, February 2016]



    This was posted on Facebook… Any truth to it? I kind of doubt it!

    Israel has just banned Heinz Ketchup, despite the strong political pull the company has with all world Governments, seeing that the heiress of the company, Theresa Heinz Kerry, is the wife of current U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

    It turns out, there at least has to be a certain amount of actual tomatoes in the actual ketchup to actually be considered ketchup, and Heinz falls WAY short in this regard.

    But don’t worry, good eater, as there are plenty of other “things” in what has turned out to be a gooey, red mystery sauce. The problem is, and as Israel’s Government, at least, has addressed in order to protect their people, these “things” don’t necessarily even belong in the human body.



    ORIGIN:On 12 February 2016, the web site Health and Home Remedies published an article reporting that the country of Israel had declared Heinz brand ketchup unsafe due to its inclusion of genetically modified ingredients and banned it from sale in that country:

    Israel has recently banned Heinz Ketchup from the country and they say it's because it doesn't have high enough amount of tomatoes in it. But there are a couple of more reasons why it was banned ... Heinz is loaded with high fructose corn syrup which is extremely unhealthy. The corn syrup is made of GMO corn and this is what makes it so dangerous. It can cause a rapid increase in your blood sugar levels and damage your liver.
    The article was nearly identical to a 22 January 2016 post published by the blog Stay on the Health Path:

    Recently in Israel the Heinz Ketchup has been forbidden. The explanation was — it didn't contain enough tomatoes. But that's not the only reason, there are a few more ... The major reason why you should avoid Heinz ketchup is that it contains corn syrup which is high in fructose. As a matter of fact, it is loaded with it.

    This syrup is made from corn which is genetically modified to a great extent. This is what makes it dangerous and toxic. This syrup can incite quick spike in your blood sugar levels and cause liver damage once it's metabolized.
    Both posts cited the presence of genetically modified ingredients (GMOs) as a factor in Israel's purported ban of Heinz brand ketchup. However, Heinz Europe notes in their FAQ that the product contains no such ingredients:

    Heinz remains committed to taking every possible step to ensure that Heinz varieties remain free from ingredients derived from genetically modified crops.

    Where there is the potential for GM material to be present or where ingredients are derived from soya or maize, we source non-GM, identity preserved ingredients through carefully audited suppliers. In addition, independent testing is carried out.
    More to the point, the claim that Israel "banned" Heinz ketchup in early 2016 was false: the articles quoted above actually referenced a mid-2015 controversy about ketchup labeling in Israel which did not involve a "ban" of any type. According to an article from the Israeli news agency Haaretz, the country's health ministry had imposed a labeling restriction on Heinz that required the company's flagship product to be labeled as "tomato seasoning" rather than "ketchup." That ruling stemmed from a January 2015 controversy in which rival ketchup producer Osem argued that the composition of Heinz's product shouldn't legally be allowed to bear the label "ketchup" because it didn't contain the required minimum amount of tomatoes. In response, Heinz accused Osem of attempting to maintain a monopoly on ketchup sales in Israel:

    In a warning letter to the country’s supermarkets, Osem claimed that a lab test it conducted showed that the Heinz ketchup distributed in Israel contains only about 20% tomato concentrate, much less than the 61% minimum required by Israeli regulations.
    That's not all. Osem claimed that Heinz’s 907-gram (32-ounce) bottles are labeled as containing 39% tomato concentrate but were found in lab tests to contain just 17% ... [Osem claimed this] meets standards in the U.S. and Europe but not in Israel, which requires ketchup to contain at least 10% tomato solids. Osem says tomato concentrate must make up at least 35% of the product to reach that level.

    Diplomat Group, which distributes Heinz ketchup in Israel and also received the warning letter, claimed that the lab tests must have produced erroneous results. But even if they were correct, Diplomat contended, the regulation Osem is citing is not binding on Heinz ketchup sold in Israel.

    "Heinz ketchup is sold as ketchup in 130 countries, but according to Osem, in Israel it's not legal," the company said. "It's clear that monopolistic Osem would be happy if only its product could be sold in Israel, but Osem's claims are without substance. It is relying on a standard that is not official and is not mandatory. This determination is backed by a legal opinion."
    And Diplomat said that Osem — which is controlled by the Swiss foods giant Nestle — has not provided the laboratory results on which it is basing its claim ... The testing, Diplomat claimed, produced an estimate rather than data from measurement equipment.

    A statement from a Heinz Europe spokesperson in response to the controversy asserted that their ketchup product was already labeled correctly:

    Commenting on its product for sale in Israel, a Heinz Europe spokesman said: "The word ketchup is indicated in English on the front of the bottle while recognising that the Israeli standard for ketchup has yet to be brought in line with US and European accepted international standards, the back label of our ketchup sold in Israel reflects current local requirements for ingredient labelling and the Hebrew name for the product."

    They added: "The original, quality recipe for Heinz Tomato Ketchup sold in Israel and the standard for ketchup around the world remains unchanged."
    Heinz ketchup has not been banned in Israel, for its alleged inclusion of GMO-derived ingredients or any other reason. All that happened was that a rival brand claimed Heinz shouldn't be allowed to label their product as "ketchup" because of differing standards over required tomato content, and the government ruled that the product (which remains readily available there) must be labeled "tomato seasoning" instead.

    LAST UPDATED: 18 February 2016
    ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: 18 February 2016
    FEATURED IMAGE: Flickr

    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    Catsup, the other way of writing ketchup, is actually a lot closer to the Chinese pronunciation. Del Monte used to spell it this way and they had a superior product.
    Fair point, mickey, but to me, that always sounded like 'kitty dinner (cat - sup)'. Here's what wikipedia has to say:
    In the 17th century, the Chinese mixed a concoction of pickled fish and spices and called it (in the Amoy dialect) kôe-chiap or kê-chiap (鮭汁, Mandarin Chinese guī zhī, Cantonese gwai1 zap1) meaning the brine of pickled fish (鮭, salmon; 汁, juice) or shellfish.[6] By the early 18th century, the table sauce had made it to the Malay states (present day Malaysia and Singapore), where it was discovered by English explorers. The Indonesian-Malay word for the sauce was kecap (pronounced "kay-chap"). That word evolved into the English word "ketchup".[7] English settlers then took ketchup with them to the American colonies.[1]

    The term Ketchup was used in 1690 in the Dictionary of the Canting Crew which was well acclaimed in North America.[8]
    Gene Ching
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  10. #10
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    This is oddly funny to me

    I never knew Israel was that picky about what they define as ketchup.

    ‘Ketchup’ War Is Over: Heinz’s ‘Red Sauce’ Restored to Former Glory
    By Dror Halavy

    Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at 7:01 am | כ"ה שבט תשע"ז


    Heinz ketchup bottles. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

    YERUSHALAYIM - No longer “just” a “tomato-based sauce,” Heinz has re-earned the right to call its pour “ketchup” again. An order that was issued last year that banned the company from calling its product ketchup was retracted, essentially overturning a 2015 court decision that ruled against the international sauce maker.

    While Heinz’s ketchup is indeed “ketchup” everywhere in the world, it wasn’t classified as such in Israel for a period of about a year and a half, after an Israel court accepted the arguments of Heinz’s Israeli competitor, Osem, which claimed that Heinz ketchup did not contain enough tomatoes to be called ketchup, based on the standards set by the government.

    Considering the situation in the rest of the world – and the 130-year history of Heinz as a maker of ketchup – the court’s order really was stretching things too far, the new order issued by the Health Ministry’s Food Service Department. In a statement, Department head Eli Gordon said that “the unique limitations imposed by Israel are not present anywhere else. This new order expands the definition of ‘ketchup’ to include products with a lower tomato content. Such products may now be called ketchup, instead of tomato-based sauces.”

    Responding to the order, Heinz’s Israeli importer said that it was an “important step in tearing down the walls preventing competition in the Israeli marketplace. This order corrects a long-standing error that separated Israel from all other countries in the world, and prevented free competition,” the importer added.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #11
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    Meanwhile, in Canada

    Ketchup as a barometer of globalism.

    French's catches up to patriotic demand with all-Canadian ketchup
    Facility in Toronto will produce 250 bottles a minute made with Canadian ingredients
    By Pete Evans, CBC News Posted: May 09, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: May 09, 2017 5:00 AM ET

    It's been more than a year since ketchup was thrust under the nationalistic limelight, as one man's Facebook campaign to get Canadians to boycott market leader Heinz for closing its Canadian factory went viral, and boosted the popularity of rivals such as French's in the process.

    French's was eager to gobble up all the goodwill, but this week the company took another step to ingratiate itself with Canadians by cranking up production at a factory north of downtown Toronto, which, at full capacity, will churn out 250 bottles of ketchup every minute.

    The ingredients are Canadian. The workers are Canadian. And now, all French's ketchup sold in Canada will be bottled here too, at the Select Foods Product facility in North York.

    Previously some French's ketchup sold in Canada was manufactured in the United States, but that's no longer the case.

    Brooke Gilliford, French's country manager for Canada, said the move is the latest in a logical progression that started about two years ago when the company's procurement managed to secure a large amount of Canadian tomatoes from Leamington, Ont. — the self-professed Tomato Capital of Canada.


    Starting today, all French's ketchup will be both made from Canadian tomatoes and manufactured in Canada. (Jacqueline Hansen/CBC)

    "This was the next natural step to make sure that the end result was 100 per cent Canadian," she said.

    The partnership will create about 10 full-time jobs at the plant, but the vast majority of the product — from the ingredients right down to the boxes and labels — are now Canadian-made, too.

    It pays to wave the flag

    French's was an inadvertent beneficiary of the early anti-Heinz backlash, but playing to nationalism is a growing trend, marketing experts say — even among famously subdued Canadians.

    "In today's day and age people are willing to spend a little more on a lot of things because of what it represents to them," marketing expert Marion Chan at TrendSpotter Consulting says.

    Price and quality will always be huge factors in buying decisions, Chan says, but consumers are increasingly willing to put their money behind companies that espouse values they believe in.

    "I've walked into grocery stores where the Heinz Ketchup is a dollar less than the French's ketchup and the French's ketchup [shelf] is empty," she said. "People are really passionate about this."

    Locally sourced produce is a growing consumer trend, and not just from people wanting to know where their food comes from — some people want to spend locally too.


    'A sense of nationalism can actually fuel the sales,' French's regional manager for Canada Brooke Gilliford says of the company's recent move to all-Canadian ketchup. (Jacqueline Hansen/CBC)

    Andrew Mitchell, the owner of Select Foods Product Ltd., says his company turned unused storage space into a functioning production line precisely because it knew the demand was there from people who espouse things like the famous 100-mile (160 kilometre) diet, which mandates people only eat food that's in season and hailing from close to where they live.

    "People want to know that their food and the things that they hold dear ... is made locally with local ingredients," he said.

    It's good business for him, but French's and consumers come out ahead too, he said.

    "The consumer gets a made-in-Canada product," he said "We help our employees, we hire more people, it's good for the community [and] we give back to French's."

    "It's a virtuous cycle."

    With files from Jacqueline Hansen
    Gene Ching
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  12. #12
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    Heinz Ketchup - Chicago Dog Sauce (Extended Cut)



    Gene Ching
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  13. #13
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    srsly?

    OK, the vid above disappeared but can any member here from Chicago explain this whole Chicago Hot Dog catsup thing?

    Chicago Hot Dog Found Beaten, Slathered In Ketchup
    September 14, 2017 11:40 AM
    Filed Under: Chicago Hot dog

    CHICAGO (CBS) — A hot dog was found severely beaten on a Chicago sidewalk, apparently because it was slathered in ketchup.

    The dog was found lying on the sidewalk, with its seedless bun separated, on the North Side.

    “There was ketchup everywhere,” one witness reported. A grisly image of the scene was posted on Reddit.


    The crime scene. (Credit: Reddit)

    Chicago police have retrieved surveillance footage of the altercation (because those cameras are everywhere, people!) but have made no arrests.

    “We believe the offender was upset that somebody had put ketchup on the hot dog,” one police source said.

    The beating upset activists, who have been waging a pro-ketchup campaign to thwart what they say is the ill-conceived idea that only mustard can adorn a Chicago hot dog.

    They have launched the “It’s OK To Put Ketchup On A Hot Dog” Facebook page, which has generated millions of likes.

    Two years ago, following a summit meeting involving hot dog stand owners across Chicago, the group issued a communique, urging Chicagoans to accept the idea that many people like ketchup on their hot dogs.

    At the time, the meeting resulted in a compromise. They agreed that a hot dog with ketchup could not be classified as a “Chicago-style hot dog” but that it was acceptable for both children and adults to order a red hot with ketchup, provided that they agreed to simply call it a hot dog with ketchup.

    A multi-million dollar public service campaign, financed with Mayor Emanuel’s red light ticket camera money, ran for months.

    However, rebel factions have held out and have been launching rouge attacks, which have increased in the past six months, police said.

    “This nonsense about ketchup or no ketchup has to stop,” one neighborhood resident said.

    Over the the Chicago Reddit page, the reaction was heated: “Born and raised in Chicago,” one person wrote. “I put ketchup on that hotdog. I put it on everything. Come find me, I’m ready to fight about it.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #14
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    Truth in advertising

    NAD Recommends French’s Discontinue "Greatest Tasting Ketchup" Ads
    Mark D. Anstoetter Madeleine M. McDonough
    USA October 9 2017

    The National Advertising Division (NAD) has recommended that French’s Food Company pull Facebook and print advertising claiming that its ketchup and mustard products are “better” than their competitors, preferred by children and free from high-fructose corn syrup.

    NAD found that French’s was unable to substantiate several claims—“Tastier Meals,” “Greatest Tasting Ketchup” and “America’s #1 mustard has the greatest tasting ketchup"—and could not support the contention that the absence of GMO ingredients or high-fructose corn syrup made the products “better” than those of competitors. NAD also noted that the Facebook ad did not refer to any improvements or changes in French’s products that would make them “better” than previous versions. French’s has agreed to discontinue the ads.
    More high-fructose corn syrup makes ketchup better...for corn farmers.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #15
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    Location
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    "Pure Ketchup: The History of America's National Condiment" by Andrew F. Smith

    November 19, 2017, 12:23 PM
    Ketchup, a sweet and sour love story


    Serve fries with no ketchup, and most of us would be SEEING RED. Luke Burbank examines our love affair with this most ubiquitous of condiments:


    Ketchup - the ubiquitous condiment that seems to go with everything. CBS NEWS

    Ketchup is just one of those "American" things … so common, so typical, so ubiquitous, that most of us never give it a second thought.

    "It has everything that you could want," said food historian Andrew Smith. "It's sweet and sour. It's got vinegar in it. It's got sugar in it."


    UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA PRESS

    Smith says ketchup actually started out in what is now considered Indonesia, as a sort of fish sauce called kêtsiap. British colonists brought it home, and then in the 19th century it landed in the U.S., where there was an over-abundance of tomatoes.

    "If you had a ton of tomatoes in September or October, you had to do something with them," said Smith. "And one of the things that you could do with them is make ketchup."

    It took off immediately, due to its ability to add flavor to things. And we mean everything.

    Smith said, "During the Depression, people would go into small diners, and they would order a glass of water. And then they would pick up the ketchup and they would add the ketchup, and they would have tomato juice at the end!"

    "It's not bad," said Burbank. "Put a little vodka in there, couple of olives ... "

    And the man maybe most responsible for ketchup's spread was a young German-American businessman in Pittsburgh named Henry J. Heinz. He started out selling horseradish, with limited success. But it was his tomato ketchup that really took off.


    Heinz's patented 4707 tomato, the workhorse of their ketchup. CBS NEWS

    Troy Shannon, who works for Heinz, showed Burbank the California tomato field where the workhorse of Heinz's ketchup, the 4707 tomato, is grown.

    "This tomato is exactly right for ketchup. It's much thicker and less juicy than a normal tomato that you buy in a grocery store," Shannon said.

    The 4707 has actually been patented by Heinz, the result of years of research and development. And after those 4707s are picked, they become the responsibility of Hector Osorno, a Tomato Ketchup Master (yes, that is his real title), who knows the secret recipe.

    Osorno is one of only seven Ketchup Masters at Heinz charged with maintaining the taste, color and consistency of all 650 million bottles sold each year.

    But one place his Ketchup Mastery won't be necessary? Chicago -- at least not when it comes to hot dogs.

    Step behind the counter at Portillo's, and you'll see that Chicago-style hot dogs (fixed with fresh-chopped onions, a kosher dill spear, and two sport peppers) aren't hurting for flavor. But never mind the ketchup.

    "No ketchup. No ketchup. Anything else, but no ketchup," said Mario Garcia. "It's, like, sacrilegious!"


    Luke Burbank breaks the ketchup rules at the Weiner's Circle, in Chicago. CBS NEWS

    And don't even think about asking for ketchup across town at the legendarily saucy Weiner's Circle. When Burbank asked for ketchup on his hot dog, he was politely informed, "Heck, no. That's against the rules of the Wiener's Circle. We don't do ketchup on hot dogs, okay? Not in Chicago, either. No. Now, go sit down and eat it up."

    Not one to take no for an answer, Burbank tried some surreptitious application of ketchup on his hot dog. She would have none of it. "No f*****g ketchup, man!"

    Well, he had to try. The good news is, that just means more ketchup for the rest us.

    For more info:
    Food historian Andrew F. Smith
    "Pure Ketchup: The History of America's National Condiment" by Andrew F. Smith (Univ. of South Carolina Press); Available via Amazon
    Heinz
    Portillo's
    Tom's Restaurant, 782 Washington Ave., Brooklyn
    The Weiner's Circle, 2622 N. Clark St., Chicago
    Of course, I prefer the China creation myth over the Indonesian one, which is why I started this thread in the first place.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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