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Thread: Power Rangers

  1. #16
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    First forum review

    Yeah, someone here has to jump on these grenades and save everyone else. That, in part, is what this forum is for, right?

    I like Elizabeth Banks and thought she might do Rita Repulsa honor. But no. Not even. This starts out like Breakfast Club then goes total CW and in the end, is just a dumb ad for Krispy Kreme. They tried to repair the black/black, yellow/Asian, pink/female of the original MMPR by switching a few colors up (Billy is now black) but the leader red ranger is still the white dude. The 1st Ep of the original MMPR achieves everything this feature length film does in 20 mins and is the prescribed eye wash after this 2017 fail.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #17
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    Another Power Rangers reboot

    Maybe we'll get that gritty one this time.

    'Power Rangers' Reboot in the Works With Creator of 'It's the End of the F---ing World' (Exclusive)
    DECEMBER 13, 2019 2:57PM by Borys Kit


    'The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers' | 20th Century Fox/Photofest

    This time, the feature is in Paramount's hands.

    Itís Morphin time for Jonathan Entwistle

    The filmmaker, perhaps best known for creating the Netflix series The End of the F---ing World, is taking on Power Rangers, a new version of the colorful family adventure franchise, this time set up at Paramount.

    Entwistle is in early negotiations to direct a new feature project that would reboot the title.

    Power Rangers was a í90s TV series and global marketing franchise, initially called The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, that used footage from a Japanese childrenís show. The premise involved a group of kids who become superheroes, each with his or her own color-coordinated outfit and matching helmet. The show first aired on Fox Kids, then on Disney-owned channel in the 2000ss. A movie also hit theaters in 1995.

    In 2017, Lionsgate produced and released a feature that rebooted the title, making it less kid-friendly and giving it a more brooding YA edge. The pic bombed, grossing only $142 million worldwide on a budget of around $100 million, and plans for a series of films were scrapped.

    Now in Paramountís court, Power Rangers is getting rebooted once more, in a way that hopes to return the franchise to its roots. The story is said to involve a time-travel element that brings the kids to the 1990s and, in Back to the Future fashion, they have to find a way to get back to their present. Patrick Burleigh, who wrote the upcoming Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway, is penning the script.

    Hasbro, which bought the property from creator Haim Saban in 2018, is producing the feature via its film arm, Allspark Pictures.

    On the surface, Entwistle is an outside-the-box choice for the shiny franchise as his Netflix show The End of the F---ing World was dark and envelope-pushing, nearly the opposite of what you can get for a Hasbro property. The series, a dark comedy that he directed and executive produced and which debuted its second season in November, told of the growing friendship between a teenage boy who believes he is a sociopath and is looking for a person to kill and a girl who persuades him to ditch their homes for a road trip.

    Entwistle is currently in postproduction on Iím Not Okay With This, another Netflix show he co-created, exec produced and directed. Also teenage-centric, Not Okay focuses on a girl dealing with high school life, her budding sexuality and superpowers.

    But the director, repped by CAA and Grandview, has shown he has a grasp on the voice of the younger generation, which Paramount execs hope will translate into something unique and appealing onscreen.


    The Hollywood Reporter
    BORYS KIT
    @borys_kit
    Gene Ching
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  3. #18
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    Netflix Power Rangers


    Netflix Lands New ‘Power Rangers’ Cinematic Universe From Creator Jonathan Entwistle
    Charles Barfield November 24, 2021 3:58 pm News

    A little more than a year ago, it was announced that Jonathan Entwistle (producer and director of “The End of the F***ing World”) was working with Hasbro and eOne on a new reboot of the “Power Rangers” universe. At the time, it was said the deal would likely be for a feature film that would potentially lead to a new set of shows. Now that is official, and it appears Netflix is the lucky streamer landing all of the “Power Rangers” goodness.

    According to an interview with Deadline, eOne’s President of Global Television, Michael Lombardo, revealed that work is now being done to bring “Power Rangers” to Netflix. And no, it’s not just going to be a film series. We’re talking about an expansive cinematic universe of films and TV series, all for the streamer.

    “Since we set up ‘Power Rangers’ with Jonathan, we pitched really a whole-world approach,” he teased. “It’s not just one show; it is shows followed by films, some kids’ programming. We have found a great writing partner for him; they are off. Knock on wood, Netflix is excited, we’re excited, we hope to have some news soon.”

    It appears eOne and Hasbro aren’t just content with a new film series; the studios both want to fully make a brand-new “Power Rangers” universe, which will include films, series, and even kids’ programming. It’s unclear if they will build off the 2016 reboot film that seemingly was enjoyed by critics for the most part but didn’t necessarily set the box office on fire. Or, more likely, it’ll be just a brand-new reboot of the franchise, offering Entwistle a blank slate to build his “Power Rangers” empire atop.

    For those unaware, “Power Rangers” tells the story of a group of disparate teens who are imbued with alien powers that allow them to transform into martial arts superheroes. They also gain control of giant robots called Zords, attempting to fight monsters and other baddies. The franchise has been going strong internationally for decades, spawning so, so many spinoffs. Even to this day, it’s a popular series on Netflix, where much of the previous shows and films can already be found.

    A release date or official plan for the new reboot has yet to be announced.
    threads
    Power-Rangers-(2017)
    Netflix Power Rangers
    Gene Ching
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  4. #19
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    Power Rangers

    Bay Area ramen restaurant employees save woman from attack while dressed as Power Rangers
    Ryan General
    15 hours ago

    On Friday evening, workers at Noka Ramen in Oakland, California, fought back against an attacker who followed a woman into the store on Friday evening.

    The staff, who were wearing full-on ďPower RangersĒ costumes, hid the woman in the kitchen and confronted the man.

    The man allegedly shouted Asian slurs and threw punches at the employees.

    The employees were eventually able to throw the unruly man out.

    The authorities later arrived and said the man had started another fight elsewhere.

    A team of Mighty Morphiní restaurant staffers foiled the plans of an evildoer in Oakland, California, on Friday evening.

    Dressed as Power Rangers, employees of Noka Ramen became actual heroes after a woman entered the restaurant seeking help at around 8 p.m. A man who had been chasing after the woman reportedly ran into the restaurant and put her in a chokehold.

    The ramen shopís servers dress up as the beloved heroes every Friday to promote the establishmentís signature cocktail, called ďThe Noka Rangers.Ē

    Customer Ploi Pirapoken, who witnessed the ordeal, documented the events in a Twitter thread that went viral on Oct. 14.

    According to Pirapoken, employees dressed as the Black Ranger and the Yellow Ranger confronted the man and told him to leave. However, the man refused to go and began throwing punches, which the Yellow Ranger reportedly blocked.

    The woman was ushered to safety in the kitchen before the man started spouting Asian slurs and ran towards her, but the Yellow Ranger grabbed the man by his collar and dragged him out of the restaurant. The man reportedly returned with a friend to try and force their way inside but were both kicked out.

    ďAll of the servers, slash Power Rangers were moving towards the scene to help one another out,Ē Ploi said. ďThe patrons started getting involved in a way that was supporting and making sure everyone was safe.Ē

    The authorities later arrived and said the man had started another fight elsewhere. Meanwhile, customers inside were reportedly told by the Pink Ranger that they would not be charged for their meals.

    Noka Ramen also posted about the incident on Instagram, where they hailed the staff as ďreal life heroesĒ for ďgoing above and beyond in our time of need.Ē

    Power Rangers is a popular entertainment franchise from the Ď90s and early 2000s that is currently owned by Hasbro.


    Featured Image via Noka Burgers
    Real Life 'Superheroes'
    Power-Rangers-(2017)
    Gene Ching
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  5. #20
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    30th Anniversary Special on Netflix

    Amy Jo Johnson Explains Why Kimberly Isn't in Netflix's Power Rangers Reunion Special: 'For the Record...'
    By Andy Swift / January 18 2023, 8:10 AM PST

    Courtesy of Saban Entertainment/Everett Collection

    Some of the most memorable characters in Power Rangers history are assembling for a 30th anniversary special on Netflix. (Key word: some.)
    Among those not returning is Amy Jo Johnson, who played Kimberly Hart, the first-ever Pink Ranger on Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, from 1993 to 1995. And lest there be any confusion about why Kimberly isnít suiting back up for old timeís sake, Johnson has cleared the air in a tweet.
    ďFor the record I never said no,Ē she tweeted on Wednesday. ďI just didnít say yes to what was offered. But other fun stuff is in store! Looking forward to watching my friends kick ass!Ē
    So, there you have it. No bad blood, just bad budgeting.
    Premiering globally on Wednesday, April 19, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: Once & Always is a standalone special that reunites David Yost as Billy Cranston, the original Blue Ranger; Walter E. Jones as Zack Taylor, the original Black Ranger; Steve Cardenas as Rocky DeSantos, the second Red Ranger; Catherine Sunderland as Kat, the second Pink Ranger; Karan Ashley as Aisha Campbell, the second Yellow Ranger; and Johnny Yong Bosch as Adam Park, the second Black Ranger.
    The special will also feature Barbara Goodson, who provided the American voice of original Power Rangers villain Rita Repulsa, as well as Richard Horvitz, who voiced their robot sidekick Alpha.
    Since her days as Kimberly, Johnson went on to play a number of memorable TV characters, including FelicityĎs Julie Emrick and FlashpointĎs Jules Callaghan. She also made a cameo alongside the late Jason David Frank (aka Green/White Ranger Tommy Oliver) in 2017ís big-screen Power Rangers movie.
    Anyone going to watch this?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  6. #21
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    Noka Ramen

    This Power Rangers-Inspired Ramen Shop Is Mastering the Art of Kick-Ass Noodles
    Alan Chazaro
    Jan 19

    The classic tonkotsu (pork belly, bean sprouts, bok choy, mushrooms, seaweed, noodles, egg) is a signature at Noka Ramen. (Alan Chazaro)
    °Hella Hungry! is a column about Bay Area foodmakers, exploring the region's culinary cultures through the mouth of a first-generation local.

    If you scan ramen threads on Reddit or Twitter, youíll find the occasional hater who claims that the Bay Areaís ramen ďsucksĒ or is ďoverrated" (particularly when compared to LA's offerings). I donít completely disagree with those statements. Many times Iíve been told about a top ramen joint in NorCal only to be underwhelmed by spaghetti-like noodles or an odd ratio of toppings that overpower the actual ramen.

    Occasionally, though, Iíll find a spot here that reminds me of the top-tier ramen I experienced during a trip to Tokyo, where each brothy spoonful delivered a soulful warmth that transcended any language barrier.

    Thatís exactly the kind of good vibe I found at Noka Ramen in Oaklandís Jack London Square. You may recall the restaurant going viral last fall, when its staff stopped a man from assaulting a woman inside the dining room ó while dressed up as Power Rangers. As the story made the rounds on social media, it also brought attention to the eateryís flamboyant staff and quirky decor. The establishmentís most essential element ó its actual ramen ó was given a well-deserved signal boost, too. They havenít held back any punches since then.

    Since it opened in the summer of 2022, Noka has been serving up some of the tastiest (and spiciest) ramen in the East Bay. The colorful shop has mastered the art of flavorful presentation, with its stylish Power RangerĖthemed tiki drinks, anime playing in the background and over-the-top menu items like the Ikari Steak Ramen, which features slowĖcooked beef rib confit, creamy spicy miso and a splash of 151 rum thatís been lit on fire ($36).


    A server at Noka Ramen embodies the restaurant's stylish vibe. (Alan Chazaro)
    But for me, itís the simpler ramen dishes that keep me coming back for more. The spicy miso ramen, in particular, is one of the fiercest broths Iíve found in the Bay and packs more than enough heat (hack: order the shi****o pepper appetizer and mix some of its spicy sauce into your bowl for an extra kick).

    What helps Noka stand out from the competition is the vision of Pop-Kasem Saengsawang, the creative owner of a local Thai restaurant mini-empire that includes Farmhouse Kitchen, Son & Garden and Daughter Thai Kitchen. With the help of Kenichi Ota, the consultant and teacher behind the Los Angeles-based Ramen School USA, Saengsawang is now adding his own spin to the ramen circuit.

    Hereís what the two collaborators and friends had to say about serving noodles on the docks of the Frisco Bay.

    This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

    ********

    ALAN CHAZARO: You both grew up in Asia before immigrating to California. What brought you here, and what has been your experience with the U.S. food industry?

    POP-KASEM SAENGSAWANG: Iím originally from Thailand. I moved to the States with the hope of becoming Bill Gates (laughs). I was a computer scientist and moved here to continue my studies. During college, I had to start working and learn how to live on my own. I worked in a kitchen and served as a manager for six years and fell in love with food. I opened my first restaurant back then, but only nine months later it closed down (laughs). I was 26 years old. It was a Japanese sushi restaurant. My chef taught me a lot about raw fish, sauces and to care about the traditions. It was all new to me. One day my chef didnít show up, and I realized that I didnít understand it well enough, that I needed to learn more. Eventually I opened Farmhouse Kitchen. It was fun. My wife [Ing Kumo] and I enjoyed that, because it was totally us.

    KENICHI OTA: I came 18 years ago and started working at a Japanese grocery shop in San Jose. I eventually opened a ramen shop of my own, but I had some issues at the time and had to return to Japan, so I closed it down. Five years ago, after I returned, I wanted to enter the ramen market, but nobody was making the sort of ramen that I wanted to make. I decided that I could help others who wanted to learn how to make ramen. I thought, letís try to support the restaurants who have a passion for Japanese food and products and who want to learn to make it. Thatís when I started to do consulting and teaching.

    Why did you decide to open Noka? Why ramen?

    SAENGSAWANG: After the pandemic, I learned a lot about comfort food and what people wanted. I was always dreaming about a noodle bar for so long. I grew up in Thailand, [where] the two key ingredients are rice and noodles. I had time to learn and study during [the pandemic]. I went to different noodle shops, tried to get a feel, talked to the chefs. But I didnít have the answers until I found Ken. The way he taught me is to jump in and make it your own experience. I feel like itís something that I really enjoyed and could adapt and turn into my own recipes. With his knowledge and help, we created a beautiful broth and chewy noodles. I didnít want my ramen shop to feel like traditional ramen, so I added lobster, short ribs, those kinds of things to the menu. I didnít want to mix with Thai or anything else, though. I wanted it to be Japanese ramen. Over many months, Ken returned to check the recipe and make it better. Iím super grateful for him.

    OTA: For Japanese people, ramen is an important part of food. I started making ramen about 14 years ago. I was working at the grocery store and making ramen there. I was working with ramen chefs to make it and started going to outside events and pop-ups as well. People think ramen is just general. But itís a whole process with many varieties and styles. Itís about details and careful directions, but the whole process is enjoyable. Itís not stressful for me. Making ramen is simply fun.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  7. #22
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    continued from previous post


    The Spicy Miso Ramen (spicy ground pork, chili paste, bamboo shoot, corn, egg, thin noodles) is a personal favorite for this writer. (Alan Chazaro)
    Where did the whole Power Rangers concept come from?

    SAENGSAWANG: The Power Rangers idea is about having fun, first of all. Itís also a good look. I grew up with Japanese cosplay, so I really enjoy the Power Rangers. The Power Rangers donít have just one guy or person ó itís a team. That was our goal. Then my wife, Ing Kumo, created the Power Ranger cocktail. When we bring it out, the server might do the Power Ranger move (chops the air). We might as well wear it and have fun. For our shyest servers, they become different people when they wear it. Customers canít see you. It changed the way they walked from when they would dress regularly. It just brings a unique experience to everyone ó customers and workers. At first everyone laughed and didnít want to wear it. But now they love to pick their colors each week: pink, black, green, white.

    Noka Ramen went viral last year after an incident involving staff members dressed as Power Rangers ó when your employees helped to end a physical altercation in public. How did you all deal with that and in what ways did it affect the community?

    SAENGSAWANG: The first couple of days I told everyone I donít want to say that we were heroes. I donít want to twist it since we werenít really sure what was going on with the gentleman and lady who were fighting in our restaurant. Our goal is to protect our customers, always. The cosplay heroes were the story that day by coincidence. My manager pushed the guy out of the restaurant. Itís difficult because we donít expect our staff to fight like that. Itís dangerous. There is one instance in San Francisco where a worker was stabbed because they ran after a customer who didnít pay. I told everyone that we didnít want to celebrate or share what happened because itís a tricky situation. When the media came, I didnít want to put my workers in the spotlight. What if the man came back and tried to attack my workers? So we focused on what we serve, how we value the customers.

    "Our goal is to protect our customers, always. Itís difficult because we donít expect our staff to fight like that. Itís dangerous. ... So we focused on what we serve, how we value the customers."
    Pop-Kasem Saengsawang
    We went to court as witnesses, and we had to make sure the woman who was attacked got the support she needed. We hired a lawyer to make sure that one of our employees wasnít involved [with any charges]. We were just trying to protect ourselves and everyone. That guy who attacked went to other locations nearby; he was also at Plank, and the police were involved there and arrested him. We donít want our employees to be in those situations, but we appreciate the community that keeps supporting us because they feel like it was a heroic thing. It turned out positive. In Oakland, we have many people who are protecting the community and making sure no one gets hurt here in this city.

    That incident brought a lot of positive attention to Noka and put it on many peopleís radars as a ramen destination. What are your thoughts on the ramen scene in the Bay Area, and what is Noka doing differently, besides dressing up as Power Rangers, to stand out?

    OTA: There is high-quality ramen in San Francisco, and there is a huge market in the Bay Area. Itís competitive for the United States. Noka is joining that market later, so Pop and I talked about concepts. We donít need to only follow the exact authentic recipes. Itís not our goal. Our goal is to have ramen lovers come back; maybe theyíre new to ramen. We focused on the mix of American people here and what we could do to make them like Noka. Thatís how we approached it.

    SAENGSAWANG: To my understanding, when people experience something and they enjoy it, they want to return because they liked it, whether itís traditional or non-traditional. Some people grew up with ramen being cooked at home by mom. Noka Ramen canít recreate that. Noka Ramen is about bringing a fun new experience. Ramen is about joy and we try our best to represent that feeling. Of course, we canít replicate the most traditional. It canít ever be exactly like home-cooked ramen. There are too many factors. So we focus on providing a good experience with noodles with love and joy. Thatís the concept.

    We donít like to compare ourselves with others. Every ramen [shop] has their own unique story of making ramen. Some restaurants here are owned by Koreans, so they add kimchi. Some are Chinese-owned and have catfish or ingredients mixed from Chinese culture. Thatís great. The generations that grew up with mixed cultures can adapt and adventure easier. But I told Ken that I wanted Noka to be Japanese without any Thai [influence].


    Noka, which is the Thai owner's ode to Japanese cosplay and culinary traditions, translates into "farmhouse." (Alan Chazaro)
    Whatís the secret to making good ramen?

    OTA: My teaching program is about making everything from scratch and using premium ingredients. Everything from scratch, including appetizers and other dishes. Lots of people use [pre-made] concentrated stuff, and the broth isnít as good. Or [they use] cheap ingredients. We use so many steps to make our ramen that itís almost too much to follow (laughs).

    SAENGSAWANG: We probably use about 40 pounds of bones or more in each batch of our broth, and it takes about six hours just to make the broth. Ken brought his technique to Noka, which is the high-pressure machine. We use that, too. Ken imported that from Japan. Traditional style uses an open-faced pot, but this high-pressure pot pushes all the ingredients into water and makes it super creamy. That makes it different and isnít a common technique here. Kenís [noodle] recipe is really unique. Itís high-end flour imported from Japan. I also purchased a noodle machine from Japan. Everything is written in Japanese and I canít read it (laughs). Google Translate didnít help. Ken came in and showed us the steps and how to operate it.

    I thought you could just buy noodles and put it in a broth (laughs). Not at all. Itís all worth it though. I want our customers to eat with love. Thatís our goal.

    Besides Noka, where is your favorite place to get ramen in the Bay Area?

    SAENGSAWANG: My spot to go for ramen is Nagi Ramen in San Mateo.

    OTA: Yes, Nagi is good. Very unique ramen. They come from Japan. I enjoy it. But also I have to say: Go Noka!




    Noka Ramen is open Mon. through Fri. from 11 a.m.Ė2 pm and 5Ė9  p.m., and Sat. and Sun. from noonĖ3  p.m. and 5Ė9 p.m. The restaurant is located at 90 Franklin St. in Oakland.
    Real Life 'Superheroes'
    Power-Rangers-(2017)
    Kung-Fu-Restaurants-amp-Bars
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  8. #23
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    MIGHTY MORPHIN POWER RANGERS: ONCE AND ALWAYS | Official Trailer (2023)

    Gene Ching
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  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    As a big Tokusatsu fan, I am very curious as to how this will play out. Power Rangers Executive Producer Simon Bennett confirmed to a fan on Twitter that this special is aimed more specifically at Mighty Morphin adult fans as opposed to the main series (the upcoming Cosmic Fury).

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