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  1. #31
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    Vagenda

    Put Away The Jade Eggs And Garlic: This Doctor's 'Vagina Bible' Separates Fact From Fiction
    46:44
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    August 29, 2019


    In her new book, "The Vagina Bible," OB-GYN and New York Times columnist Dr. Jen Gunter separates myth from medicine about women’s bodies. (Courtesy Jason LeCras)

    Editor's note: A gentle warning to listeners across the country, this hour will address mature subject matter.

    OB-GYN and New York Times columnist Dr. Jen Gunter advises her patients — and her hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers — to put away the jade eggs, the garlic, and to stop listening to Gwyneth Paltrow. In her funny, fact-based book, Gunter separates myth from medicine about women’s bodies.

    Guest
    Dr. Jen Gunter, obstetrician and gynecologist. Author of "The Vagina Bible" and columnist for The New York Times. (@DrJenGunter)

    From The Reading List
    Excerpt from "The Vagina Bible" by Jen Gunter

    Introduction

    Get highlights, extras and notes from the hosts sent to your inbox each week with On Point's newsletter. Subscribe here.

    I HAVE A VAGENDA: for every woman to be empowered with accurate information about the vagina and vulva.

    One of the core tenets of medicine is informed consent. We doctors provide information about risks and benefits and then, armed with that information, our patients make choices that work for their bodies. This only works when the information is accurate and unbiased. Finding this kind of data can be challenging, as we have quickly passed through the age of information and seem to be stalled in the age of misinformation.

    Snake oil and the lure of a quick fix have been around for a long time, and so false, fantastical medical claims are nothing new. However, sorting myth from medicine is getting harder and harder.

    In addition to social media feeds that constantly display medical mes saging of variable quality, there are the demands of a headline-driven news cycle that constantly requires new content-even when it doesn't exist. With women's bodies, there are even more forces of misdirection at work. Pseudoscience and those who peddle it are invested in misinformation, but so is the patriarchy.

    Obsessions with reproductive tract purity and cleansing date back to a time when a woman's worth was measured by her virginity and how many children she might bear. A vagina and uterus were currency. Playing on these fears awakens something visceral. It's no wonder the words “pure,” "natural,” and “clean” are used so often to market products to women.

    Members of the media and celebrity influencers tap into these fears with articles about and products to prevent vaginal mayhem, as if the vagina (which evolved to stretch and tear to deliver a baby long before suture material was invented) is somehow so fragile that it is constantly in a state of near catastrophe.

    Why The Vagina Bible instead of The Vagina and Vulva Bible? Because that is how we collectively talk about the lower reproductive tract (the vagina and vulva). Medically, the vagina is only the inside, but language evolves and words take on new meaning. For example, "catfish" and "text" both have additional meanings that I could never have imagined when I was growing up. “Gut” is from the Old English for the intestinal tract, usu ally meaning the lower part (from the stomach on down) but not always. It's actually a very imprecise term; yet it has been embraced by the medical community and is even the name of a leading journal dedicated to the study of the alimentary (digestive) tract, the liver, biliary tree, and pancreas.

    I have been in medicine for thirty-three years, and I've been a gynecologist for twenty-four of them. I've listened to a lot of women, and I know the questions they ask as well as the ones they want to ask but don't quite know how.

    The Vagina Bible is everything I want women to know about their vulvas and vaginas. It is my answer to every woman who has listened to me pass on information in the office or online and then wondered, “How did I not know this?”

    You can read the book in order from front to back or visit specific chapters or even sections as they speak to you. It's all good! I hope over the years many pages will become worn as you go back to double-check what a doctor told you in the office, to research a product that makes wild claims about improving vaginas and vulvas, or help a friend or sexual partner out with an anatomy lesson.

    Misinforming women about their bodies serves no one. And I'm here to help end it.

    From the book THE VAGINA BIBLE by Jen Gunter. Copyright © 2019 by Jen Gunter. Excerpted with permission by Kensington Publishing Corp.

    New York Times: "Your Vagina Is Terrific (and Everyone Else’s Opinions Still Are Not)" — "When I was in my 20s and already a doctor, I still let my sexual partners believe they were the experts in female anatomy, despite the fact that I was studying to be an OB/GYN. These men would tell me things that were untrue and I would count ceiling tiles while they fumbled around in the wrong ZIP code, if you know what I mean.

    "Instead of correcting them, I just nodded and faked my share of orgasms because I prioritized men feeling comfortable over my own sexual pleasure.

    "It’s enraging that faking orgasms to satisfy a man’s sexual script has not been confined to the trash heap of bad history. Studies tell us that up to 67 percent of women who have experienced penile-vaginal intercourse have faked orgasms. All for reasons painfully familiar to me: not wanting to hurt my male partner’s feelings, knowing I won’t be listened to, feeding his ego or simply wanting the sex to end.

    "We rarely talk openly about what’s required for a woman to have a good sexual experience, and so many heterosexual women learn the mechanics of sex and female orgasms from movies (most of which are written, directed and produced by ... men). What I like to call the three-strokes-of-penetration-bite-your-lip-arch-the-back-and-moan routine."

    Washington Post: "Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop touted the ‘benefits’ of putting a jade egg in your vagina. Now it must pay." — "We need to talk about Gwyneth Paltrow's vaginal eggs. Again.

    "For the uninitiated, these are the egg-shaped jade or quartz stones sold through Goop, Paltrow's new-age wellness company and lifestyle brand. Per Goop, women are supposed to insert said eggs into their vaginas — and keep them there for varying periods of time, sometimes overnight — to 'get better connected to the power within.'

    "For $66, one can buy a dark nephrite jade egg, which allegedly brings increased sexual energy and pleasure. Or, for $55, there is the 'heart-activating' rose quartz egg, for those who want more positive energy and love. Until recently, a page on Goop's website promised that the eggs would 'increase vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and feminine energy in general.'

    "Those claims were, well, a stretch, with no grounding in real science, according to a consumer protection lawsuit filed by state prosecutors representing 10 California counties. On Wednesday, state officials and Goop announced that they had settled the suit, with Paltrow's company agreeing to pay $145,000 in civil penalties.

    "Specifically, the suit called out Goop's jade egg, its rose quartz egg and its 'Inner Judge Flower Essence Blend' as products 'whose advertised medical claims were not supported by competent and reliable science,' according to the Santa Clara County district attorney's office. For example, the flower essence blend had been marketed as a blend of essential oils that could ward off depression.

    "And the jade eggs? They had developed a reputation — and a backlash — of their own."
    Grace Tatter produced this hour for broadcast.

    This program aired on August 29, 2019.
    THREADS
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  2. #32
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    Gwyneth is a ridiculously good looking person.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  3. #33
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    coming to my hood

    "O.G. Goop" Marianne Williamson Will Join Gwyneth Paltrow at San Francisco Summit
    1:09 PM PDT 10/3/2019 by Ingrid Schmidt , Nadia Neophytou


    ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images; Jesse Grant/Getty Images
    Goop CEO Gwyneth Paltrow and author/presidential candidate Marianne Williamson.

    "In many ways, Marianne Williamson is O.G. Goop," Goop CCO Elise Loehnen told The Hollywood Reporter, while another spokesperson added that Paltrow is a "huge fan" but isn't "making any political endorsements."

    It is finally happening. By far the Goop-iest 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, author Marianne Williamson (a self-described "***** for God") and actress/Goop CEO Gwyneth Paltrow (whose company has referred to Williamson as a "spiritual legend") are having a public meeting of the minds next month.

    On Thursday, Goop announced that Paltrow and chief content officer Elise Loehnen will be hosting a fireside chat with Williamson on Nov. 16 as the highlight of the first In Goop Health Summit to be held in San Francisco, accompanied by the opening of a permanent San Francisco brick-and-mortar Goop Lab store.

    While Williamson is currently running near the bottom of the pack in the polls, and has yet to secure a place in the upcoming Oct. 15 and November debates, maybe her pairing with Paltrow will help her gain traction. What better antidote to the country’s spiritual deterioration than Goop-ification to go hand in hand with Williamson’s philosophies, as outlined in her book, Politics of Love?

    While Paltrow would not comment to The Hollywood Reporter on her political leanings or on her forthcoming chat with Williamson, a Goop spokesperson told THR that "Goop/GP aren’t making any political endorsements," adding that "GP is a huge fan, so this is an extension of that."

    Loehnen told THR: "In many ways, Marianne Williamson is O.G. Goop: She’s been beating a spiritual trail for decades and leading a global discourse on how we’re all connected to each other, to the planet, and to the universal force of love. She is venerated not only for her clarity around the courageness required to move societies forward, but her willingness to step into the middle of difficult and triggering conversations and blast the fog of fear away to reveal the higher, though not always easier, path."


    Courtesy of Goop
    Goop chief content officer Elise Loehnen and Marianne Williamson.

    Last July, Goop released a Podcast with Williamson, titled “Who Are You In Crisis?” And the introduction on the site says, "Williamson urges for compassionate resistance, real maturity, and a greater understanding of the dichotomy that is built into the DNA of America. Her insight into crises — and the people she sees us becoming on the other side of it — lights a fire."

    As at previous summits, there will be a mix of panels and workshops that explore the philosophies and products touted by Paltrow’s wellness company, including a retail hall with a "wellness boutique" and "clean beauty apothecary." Workshops and activities will be held in six spaces themed Think, Glow, Move, Restore, Feel and Reinvent. The day will zero in on "issue-focused talks with leading doctors, scientists, entrepreneurs and boundary-pushing celebrities," according to a press statement, as well as wellness sessions, from dreamwork to trampoline bounce classes.

    Some of the pros confirmed so far include palliative care specialist (and Oprah favorite) BJ Miller and Paltrow’s facialist Anastasia Achillos. Sophia Bush will join the likes of mindfulness and compassion expert Shauna Shapiro and the environmental author Tatiana Schlossberg, granddaughter of John F. Kennedy.

    Tickets for the day-long symposium, $1,000, are available starting today at goop.com.

    After hosting a number of pop-ups in the past couple of years in the Bay Area (where the company is reported to have its fourth-most engaged market), Paltrow’s lifestyle brand will open the doors of a permanent Goop Lab at 2121 Fillmore Street in November, around the same time as the Goop summit. New York-based architecture and design firm Ronen Lev is designing the 1,500-square-foot space, which will be the company's fifth permanent location, joining Los Angeles, New York, London and a space at Montecito's Rosewood Miramar Beach hotel.

    Bay Area shoppers can expect the curated boutique to be stocked with luxury products (a mix of Goop branded merchandise and other labels) including clothing, accessories, beauty items, gifts and homewares.


    INGRID SCHMIDT
    Ingrid.Schmidt@thr.com
    IngridSchmidt_

    NADIA NEOPHYTOU
    THRnews@thr.com
    @thr
    O.G. Goop.

    $1000 is way to rich for my blood.

    I wonder if there are press passes. I'd interview Gwyneth in a heartbeat. We could discuss Jade Eggs.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #34
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    Elle

    Gwyneth Paltrow Is Not Going to Read This Story
    BY MOLLY LANGMUIR
    OCT 9, 2019


    Jacket, $5,350, swimsuit, $1,550, bracelets,$1,900 each, all, Chanel. Her own rings.
    ZOEY GROSSMAN

    All of this started with Gwyneth Paltrow hearing from Brad Falchuk—the producer, writer, and director who is also, as of last fall, her husband—that she’d influenced a character in a Netflix series he was working on. “Then it went to, ‘I’ve written this part for you. Would you consider doing it?’” she says. Many actresses would have leaped at the chance. The show, The Politician, was created by Ryan Murphy, with whom Falchuk often collaborates (they cocreated Glee and American Horror Story), and is a dark comedy about class, privilege, and flawed, self-interested people who nonetheless try their best to do good. More specifically, it focuses on a young man, Payton (Ben Platt), driven by a strain of ambition so potent it could fuel a rocket ship; the first season follows his campaign to become high school president, which is part one of his plan to inhabit the White House. Paltrow was being asked to play his mother. “I said, ‘No,’” she says. “‘You know there’s no way I can do it.’”

    In 1999, Paltrow won an Academy Award for her role in Shakespeare in Love, and soon after became one of the biggest movie stars in the world. But she began to pull back from Hollywood once she became a mother in 2004 (she now has two children—a daughter, Apple, and son, Moses—with Coldplay singer Chris Martin, from whom she famously “consciously uncoupled” in 2014). In recent years, she has focused most of her attention on her wellness company, Goop, which began in 2008 as a newsletter she sent from her kitchen and is now a vast enterprise. The company has faced controversy—a piece suggesting women could benefit from placing a jade egg in their vagina, for example, prompted disapproving statements from gynecologists (Goop now tags certain posts “Fascinating and Inexplicable”)—but it’s been a huge financial success. As of 2018, it was worth $250 million, and Paltrow suggests it’s subsequently expanded beyond that. “That’s an old number,” she says. Is it higher or lower? “Of course it’s higher,” she says. “Thank goodness. Oh my God.”


    Bodysuit, G. Label. Necklace, Tiffany & Co.
    ZOEY GROSSMAN

    Since 2015, other than a brief cameo on a TV show, Paltrow has only appeared onscreen as Pepper Potts, the romantic foil to Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man in Marvel’s ever-expanding universe. Her difficulty keeping track of which Marvel movies she’s in has been a much-repeated joke on the internet, though Paltrow doesn’t seem to be aware of this. “I never read stuff,” she says. “But it is confusing because there are so many Marvel movies, and to be honest, I haven’t seen very many of them. It’s really stupid and I’m sorry, but I’m a 47-year-old mother.”

    Regarding The Politician, though, Falchuk and Murphy were persistent—“Like a dog with a bone,” Paltrow says. The production agreed to work around her schedule, and it helped that Falchuk cut some of her lines.“She’d show me a giant chunk of her dialogue and be like, ‘I have a board meeting in two days. Please don’t make me do this,’” he says. (Platt describes the rapport between Paltrow and Falchuk, who met on the set of Glee back in 2010, as being like “Cinderella and Prince Charming.” Paltrow does say Falchuk bossed her around; when I mention this to him, he says, “Well, that’s my job. And I think she liked it.”) “She was like, ‘Of course, I got roped into it,’” says Paltrow’s friend Cameron Diaz, leaning hard into the r. “It’s very funny. But she can do 4 million things at once.” (On set, Paltrow often met with Goop staffers in her downtime.)


    Suspender trousers, Giorgio Armani. Bracelets, rings, all Cartier
    ZOEY GROSSMAN

    Paltrow first appears about halfway through the first episode, wearing an emerald-green caftan and 10 million dollars’ worth of jewelry, and dropping tidbits of advice that could be straight out of a self-help book. In another scene, after Payton has been hospitalized, she places crystals by his head and brings in a healer. Her character can seem, in other words, like a satirical take on the public perception of Paltrow; that she’s viewed this way amuses and frustrates people close to her. “Anybody who thinks that someone as successful as Gwyneth has just been floating around in caftans all day is just being rude,” says her friend Kate Hudson, who adds, “I’m way more like that than Gwyneth—I really do throw crystals around.”

    But Falchuk and Paltrow both insist that skewering these projections wasn’t their intention. “The way [my character is] as a mother is most closely based on me,” Paltrow says. “He was also borrowing from other aspects of my life.” One plot point, for example, involves wealthy parents paying for their children to get into the Ivy League (oddly enough, it was written before the college admissions scandal emerged this past March). “I’m familiar with that world,” she explains.

    The Politician is concerned with ambition—what it means to be driven by it, how it can distort you. Paltrow says that as an actress, she never felt that ambitious, though this was as much for systemic reasons as it was for personal ones. “In the ’90s, when I was coming up, it was a very male-dominated field,” she says. “You used to hear, ‘That actress is so ambitious,’ like it was a dirty word.” (Paltrow was an early and essential source on Harvey Weinstein for the New York Times.) But now, with Goop, “my ambition has been unleashed,” she admits.

    That Paltrow is more concerned with business these days than with acting would never be apparent from her turn in The Politician, though. “The reaction of most people in our lives who have seen the show is, ‘Screw you for not doing this more,’” Falchuk says. “Seeing her quiet elegance and how she can command a room was a reminder that she is a bona fide screen presence,” Platt says. “She exudes light.”


    Dress by Ralph Lauren Collection. Earrings and bracelets by Tiffany & Co. Her own rings.
    ZOEY GROSSMAN

    Styled by Charles Varenne. Hair by Anh Co Tran at The Wall Group; makeup by Jillian Dempsey at SWA. Manicure by Ashlie Johnson at The Wall Group; produced by Michelle Hynek at Crawford & Co Productions.

    This article appears in the November 2019 issue of ELLE, on newsstands October 22.



    MOLLY LANGMUIR
    Molly Langmuir is a staff writer for ELLE.
    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    Gwyneth is a ridiculously good looking person.
    This repost is for you David. Especially that third B&W pic. Always looking out for ya, old friend.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #35
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    Gwyneth is just toying with her customers now

    JANUARY 10TH, 2020
    Gywneth Paltrow Is Selling A Candle That Smells Like Her Vagina
    By Amanda Prestigiacomo
    DailyWire.com


    Rich Fury/Getty Images for Girlboss

    Actress Gwyneth Paltrow is selling a candle that smells like her vagina at $75 a pop for her lifestyle and wellness company Goop. The name of the candle is none other than, you guessed it, “This Smells Like My Vagina.”

    Paltrow first came across a scent that she said reminded her of the smell of her own vagina, she claims. The scent was then finalized for the “This Smells Like My Vagina” candle, which reportedly sold out within hours of its test run.

    “This candle started as a joke between perfumer Douglas Little and GP — the two were working on a fragrance, and she blurted out, ‘Uhhh … this smells like a vagina,'” Goop outlined.

    The smell then “evolved into a funny, gorgeous, sexy, and beautifully unexpected scent,” according to the company.

    “That turned out to be perfect as a candle — we did a test run … and it sold out within hours,” Goop bragged. “It’s a blend of geranium, citrusy bergamot, and cedar absolutes juxtaposed with Damask rose and ambrette seed that puts us in mind of fantasy, seduction, and a sophisticated warmth.”

    Goop, clearly, is not a traditional brand. In 2018, for example, the wellness company settled a six-figure lawsuit surrounding their “vagina eggs,” which were promoted to help regulate females’ hormones and negate menstrual cramps.

    “It turns out, contrary to Goop’s advice, shoving a large egg made out of a porous mineral into the recesses of your lady-regions may not be the best treatment for conditions like endometriosis,” The Daily Wire reported. “Apparently, Goop knew — or, according to a complaint filed by the California consumer protection office, Goop should have known before they marketed this product, as well as a ‘flower essence’ they claimed treated depression, to consumers on their website.”

    “The health and money of Santa Clara County residents should never be put at risk by misleading advertising,” the attorney for the California consumer protection office said in a statement. “We will vigilantly protect consumers against companies that promise health benefits without the support of good science … or any science.”

    Paltrow again made headlines for her “progressive” ways last month, this time for gifting herself a ******** for Christmas.

    The Daily Wire reported on the ad:

    After Gwyneth shakes herself up a couple of Martinis, the narrator says “someone’s double-fisting” as she struts through the kitchen with her libations.

    “The holidays are work, so don’t be afraid to ask for help with lighting, and food, and style, and hair, and hair, and hair,” the narrator cheekily continues. “Find your favorite look, or eleven of them. Look fabulous in each one, and get super high… In your heels, of course.”

    The ad then takes a salacious turn by reminding people to treat themselves to a little self-service, but only after doing “something for others.”

    “Do something for others but don’t forget about No. 1,” the narrator says as Paltrow pulls a ******** from a Christmas stocking and keeps it for herself. “Yes, that is a ********.”

    The ad finishes with the narrator wishing everyone a “happy holidays from G. Label.”
    This would make a great joke gift tho...if it wasn't $75. For a candle. Gwyneth wtf?


    THREADS
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  6. #36
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    Goop Lab


    The Goop Lab launches Jan. 24, 2020: it will likely be full of magical thinking and unproven health stories — making it a huge conflict of interest for Gwyneth Paltrow. (Shutterstock)


    Gwyneth Paltrow’s new Goop Lab is an infomercial for her pseudoscience business

    January 12, 2020 8.36am EST
    Author
    Timothy Caulfield
    Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy; Professor, Faculty of Law and School of Public Health; and Research Director, Health Law Institute, University of Alberta

    Disclosure statement
    Timothy Caulfield receives funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Genome Canada, and the Canada Research Chairs Program. He is affiliated with Peacock Alley Entertainment and Speakers' Spotlight. Caulfield also had a show, "A User's Guide to Cheating Death", that was on Netflix.

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    Last week, Netflix dropped the trailer for Gwyneth Paltrow’s new show The Goop Lab. It is a six-episode docuseries launching on Jan. 24 that, according to the trailers, focuses on approaches to wellness that are “out there,” “unregulated” and “dangerous.” (Read: science-free.)

    The backlash by health-care professionals and science advocates was immediate and widespread. And for good reason. As noted by my friend, obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. Jen Gunter in Bustle magazine, the trailer is classic Goop: “Some fine information presented alongside unscientific, unproven, potentially harmful therapies….”

    We know the spread of this kind of health misinformation can have a significant and detrimental impact on a range of health behaviours and beliefs. This is the age of misinformation and this show seems likely to add to the noise and public confusion about how to live a healthy lifestyle.

    But what has been largely overlooked in the initial wave of critiques is the conflict-of-interest issue. The producers of this show — that is, Gwyneth Paltrow and her company Goop — benefit directly from not only the show being popular but also from the legitimization of pseudoscience. This show is, basically, an infomercial for the Goop brand, which is built around science-free products and ideas.


    The Goop Lab trailer on Netflix. The show drops Jan. 24, 2020.

    Marketing pseudoscience

    To be fair, I have yet to see a full episode. But given the content of the trailer and Goop’s history of pushing harmful nonsense, there is little reason to be optimistic about the role of science in the series. Regardless, the mere existence of the series will allow Paltrow and Goop to build the brand, which is currently estimated to be worth US$250 million.

    The show serves as an opportunity to market the kind of magical thinking and pseudoscience that will help to sell Goop’s products. It would be like Netflix streaming a show called The Coca-Cola Beverage Lab or the The Starbucks Coffee Adventure.

    One of the things that attracts people to the alternative health practices pushed by entities like Goop is frustration with the impact of private industry and the profit motive — particularly in the context of the pharmaceutical industry — on the conventional health-care system.

    This concern about the impact of industry is understandable. There is a vast literature highlighting industry misbehaviour and the adverse consequences of Big Pharma’s influence on research, clinical practice and clinical guidelines. Awareness of these issues has contributed to a decrease in trust in the medical profession and even to harmful trends like vaccination hesitancy.

    For the advocates of alternative approaches to wellness, conventional medicine is often positioned as irrevocably compromised and corrupt. And many have come to believe even extreme versions of this narrative.

    A 2014 survey found 37 per cent of Americans believe (and another 31 per cent think it could be true) that the “Food and Drug Administration is deliberately preventing the public from getting natural cures for cancer and other diseases because of pressure from drug companies.” Goop has also enabled these kinds of extreme perspectives.


    The Goop Lab stars Gwyneth Paltrow and Elise Loehne. (Netflix)

    Alternative medicine is an industry

    The implication, of course, is that alternative approaches are somehow untainted or, at least, less tainted by vested interests and are, therefore, the better choice. But this “clean hands” framing is patently false.

    First, we need to recognize that alternative medicine is also a huge industry. The worldwide “wellness” market, which is largely composed of unproven and “alternative” modalities, has been estimated to be worth over US$4 trillion.

    The sale of herbal medicine and supplements are also multi-billion dollar industries. Given the size of these markets, it would be naive to believe that alternative medicine is somehow missing the twisting profit-motive incentives that have created problems for conventional health care.

    Second, the alternative health community is also rife with conflicts and biases. To cite just a few examples, naturopaths profit from the in-office sale of products and have partnered with the vitamin industry to expand the reach of their practice.

    In addition, alternative medicine research has been influenced by various systemic biases. And we shouldn’t forget that many of the most commonly used alternative products, most notably supplements and herbal remedies, are often made by the very pharmaceutical industry that alternative wellness devotees are seeking to avoid.

    Third, motivated reasoning plays a big role here. When an individual or a company has built a profession or a business model around a particular worldview, this commitment will have an impact on how the relevant evidence is interpreted, used and presented to the public.

    If you are a practising homeopath, for instance, it would be tremendously difficult to accept what the evidence says about the remedies you offer. Indeed, accepting the science would mean you would lose your livelihood and professional identity.

    More needs to be done to combat the adverse impact that conflicts of interest issues can have on bio-medical research and clinical practice. But we also need to recognize that profound conflicts of interest exist in the alternative health and wellness domain. We should not give those involved with this industry — including Paltrow and Goop — a pass.
    We let go of Netflix but if I still had it, I'd watch this.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  7. #37
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    Has anyone here watched Goop Lab?

    I'm embarrasingly curious now, but I no longer have Netflix.

    Goop’s Horrible Netflix Show Accidentally Makes a Case Against Social Media Censorship
    By misidentifying parts of the anatomy she claims to be an expert on, actress and self-appointed lifestyle guru Gwyneth Paltrow demonstrates the damage caused by censoring women’s bodies.
    By Jillian C. York
    Feb 13 2020, 5:00am


    NETFLIX

    When Gwyneth Paltrow’s The Goop Lab premiered on Netflix last month, the collective eye-roll on social media was palpable.

    Goop—Paltrow’s “wellness and lifestyle company”—has been rightly panned by critics over the years for promoting pseudoscientific claims and wellness devices that range from the absurd to the overtly harmful. The Goop Lab is no exception; one Washington Post op-ed called the series “horrible,” while the Guardian gave it 1/5 stars in a review.

    Despite this, my curiosity got the best of me one night and I tuned in to watch the most talked-about episode: the one in which Paltrow misidentifies the scope of the vagina, revealing that she’s not particularly informed about the anatomy she so often claims expertise on. The episode, entitled “The Pleasure Is Ours,” is centered on the work of 90 year-old sex educator Betty Dodson, famous for her workshops in which she teaches women how to effectively masturbate to orgasm.

    The episode, which comes with a disclaimer, is not quite what I expected. Rather than peddling jade eggs, it sells the viewer on Dodson’s methods (which have, for what it’s worth, been the subject of empirical research). And perhaps most surprisingly, the episode is quite graphic: Dodson’s colleague Carlin Ross demonstrates the technique, her vulva shown on screen as she masturbates, along with several others in a slideshow meant to depict diversity.

    What was surprising about this was Netflix’s willingness to show, in close-up detail, a part of the body that is—with precious few exceptions— verboten in Silicon Valley. As I’ve written in the past, social media platforms appear to have taken their cues about morality and governance from other forms of media. Just as the American film industry is “self-regulated” by the notoriously prudish Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), Facebook’s own policies ban nearly all depictions of the nude human body—regardless of the fact that it’s constitutionally-protected expression.

    Facebook and its properties, such as Instagram, have a propensity to go overboard when enforcing these policies. Take, for example, The Vulva Gallery—like the sex episode of Goop Lab, the Instagram account seeks to normalize the vulva by posting illustrated images based on user-submitted photos. Illustrations are permitted by Instagram’s Community Standards, but that didn’t prevent the account from getting banned at one point—no doubt a mis-application of the rules, an unfortunately uncommon phenomenon.

    In fact, the over-banning of sexual content is so common that there are numerous articles highlighting accounts that seek to challenge and circumvent the rules. While social media platforms often claim that bans on nudity are meant to protect users from porn and non-consensual exploitative imagery (often called “revenge porn”), we should be questioning the harms that this black-and-white approach to nudity and human sexuality is causing to our society—and to women in particular.

    As The Goop Lab episode makes clear, many women (including Paltrow) don’t know a whole lot about their own anatomy. In most societies, we’re taught that our nether regions are something shameful, to keep covered up, at least until we’re wed. While I clearly remember a high school sex ed demonstration that involved putting a condom on a banana, I can’t recall seeing any images of women’s nude bodies. Many women report seeing another vulva for the first time in mainstream porn, where only certain body types (and hair removal practices) are commonly shown.

    That’s what makes this episode so important—and one of the reasons the pervasive social media ban on depictions of the human body is so damaging. But it’s not the only reason; platform bans on the human body disproportionately affect women. Facebook’s community guidelines, for example, allow depictions of topless men but ban women from appearing shirtless. Not only does this discriminatory practice reinforce damaging ideas about the female body as inherently sexual, it’s also rooted in an outdated binary perception of gender.

    No one has illustrated the latter point better than Courtney Demone, a trans woman who challenged Instagram’s rules by posting topless photos of herself as she transitioned a few years ago and documented the process for Mashable. Demone’s piece draws parallels between the street harassment she was subject to as her appearance became more traditionally feminine and the loss of the privilege to be topless that she experiences, which she describes as a “clear example of the sexism that comes with living in a female body”.

    Interestingly, as executive producer Shauna Minoprio told the LA Times, Goop execs chose to shoot the masturbation scene without asking permission—not unlike the many women who regularly challenge social media’s prudish rules by posting their nudes anyway.

    In sexist Silicon Valley, that may just be the only way to move the needle forward.
    Gene Ching
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    Gwyneth responds

    Just gonna put this out there right now...Gwyneth should go into politics next. She's got the cash for the American oligarchy.

    FEBRUARY 18, 2020 5:56PM PT
    ‘The Goop Lab’: Gwyneth Paltrow Talks Producing Unscripted TV, Her All-Star Staff and Online Haters

    By MATT DONNELLY
    Senior Film Writer
    @MattDonnelly


    CREDIT: ADAM ROSE/NETFLIX

    Between a high-profile press tour, a vortex of online negativity and a raging conversation around female genitalia, it is likely you are aware that Gwyneth Paltrow launched a docuseries on Netflix in late January.

    “The Goop Lab,” announced exclusively by Variety last year, is a six-episode manifestation of Paltrow’s lifestyle brand Goop and its many content verticals, built around a central thesis that the Oscar winner described as “optimization of self.”

    Response has played out across the normal spectrum on which Paltrow and Goop are received: adoration from like-minded seekers, interest from fashion and film fans, and invective from trolls and pockets of the medical community. During a recent conversation at Netflix headquarters in Los Angeles, Paltrow had an easy smile for all of it. She’s been here before.

    “I will never understand the level of fascination and projection. But we don’t want to not change the conversation just to please everybody,” Paltrow said. “We do what we do in total integrity, and we love what we do. It doesn’t even matter, really, that some are trying to get attention for writing about us.”

    Indeed, in the days following Variety’s initial report last February, headlines declared the partnership between Paltrow and the streaming giant “a win for pseudo-science.” The almost-retired performer and CEO chalks it up to clickbait.

    “That kind of media, a lot of it is dying. The business model is failing, and they’re turning to the tabloidization to get the clicks. So it works, when they write about me, apparently. Because they keep doing,” she said. Paltrow added she would be open to the criticism “if it was something I could learn from.” But when it comes to Goop-friendly topics like energy healing?



    “[It] might not be backed with double-blind studies, but its been happening for thousands of years,” she said.

    A lot of Goop’s experimentation involves already-familiar practices, as illustrated on the series and explored in-depth on Goop.com. Jumping into a freezing ocean to prolong life and stave off anxiety? Experimenting with psychedelics to ease PTSD? Acupuncture, for the love? Goop is not responsible for introducing any of these notions into the consciousness. What’s new here, at least for Paltrow, is the way she approached the medium — as an unscripted television producer, not a movie star.

    “It’s so bizarre, and so different. Normally someone hands me something and tells me what I’m playing. This was from our imaginations and what inspires us, and what we hope to learn more about. It’s been a pretty cool experience,” Paltrow said. “The most difficult part was honing down what the six subjects were going to be. The trick was the process of distilling down our content and have all the topics be different enough.”

    Outside of scripted features and television, Paltrow’s credits are limited. She has appeared in documentaries about makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin and designer Valentino Garavani, and more than a decade ago popped up on a PBS series about Spanish cooking.

    “I’ve never done anything unscripted — like, how does this work? How does it feel good? How does it not be …” Paltrow asked, searching for the words.

    Like “Jersey Shore,” we wondered?

    “Right. What is this world? What is the construct?” she said. “The most difficult part was honing down what the six episode subjects were going to be. We wanted it to appeal to lots of different people. You can get really specific on a subject, and then it might not be as appealing.”

    For the past five years, Paltrow has done a delicate dance with how much she will allow herself to be Goop’s preeminent spokeswoman. She has repeatedly said that her ideal version of scale would be to grow Goop past the point of her own image. Currently valued at $250 million with several rounds of venture capital investment, her high-wire act is working.

    “For the show, I asked, ‘How can I be in it, but not too in it?’ It was important for me that Goop staffers be the stars of the show. We have such incredible people at the company. I thought there would be so much more impact to meet and love them, and watch them go through those things,” she said.

    Go through it, they do. Goop employees explore their private parts and sexual hangups, insecurities around aging, parental traumas, and other topics that Goop chief content officer Elise Loehnen jokingly said amounted to “an HR nightmare.”

    Netflix has yet to announce a possible renewal of “The Goop Lab,” but streaming or not, Goop will be there asking the questions, Paltrow said.

    “What I think is great is that we are a brand that people feel strongly about,” she concluded. “One way or the other.”
    Gene Ching
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  9. #39
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    slightly ot

    What is up with female celebs making products that smell like their vagina? Will we need an indie thread on this?

    Erykah Badu’s $50 vagina-scented incense sells out in minutes
    The singer is proud of the urban legend surrounding her vagina and decided to use it as the base for her new product
    By Blue Telusma -February 24, 2020

    When Erykah Badu announced that she would be selling vagina scented incense, a lot of people raised their brows. But now that her product is a certified hit, she and her yoni inspired offering are laughing all the way to the bank.

    At the beginning of the month, it was reported that one of the products that the four-time Grammy Award-winning Neo-Soul singer would be featuring in her online marketplace, Badu World Market, would be an incense scent based on her genitals.

    “There’s an urban legend that my p—y changes men,” she said in a cover story for 10 Magazine. “The men that I fall in love with, and fall in love with me, change jobs and lives.”

    The singer, who will be 49 years of age on the 26th, is proud of the urban legend surrounding her vagina and decided to use it as the base for her new product.

    “I took lots of pairs of my panties, cut them up into little pieces and burned them,” she explained matter-of-factly. “Even the ash is part of it.”

    Okayplayer

    @okayplayer
    Replying to @okayplayer @fatbellybella
    UPDATE: Erykah Badu (@fatbellybella) has just restocked “Badu ***** Premium Incense."

    The shop calls it "the hottest ***** on the market." 😳 http://bit.ly/2SWvVmw

    View image on Twitter
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    2:09 PM - Feb 20, 2020
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    21 people are talking about this
    When asked why she felt it necessary to share something so personal, she said without a shred of self-consciousness, “The people deserve it!”

    Apparently consumers agree because when her “Premium Incense” went on pre-sale on February 20th, it sold out in 19 minutes.

    “Well guys, thank you for making our debut of ‘Badussy’ […] sell out in a matter of 19 minutes,” the singer said Thursday while visibly beaming in an Instagram video.
    Gene Ching
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    I confess...I want Gwyneth's mask.

    Wearing a mask, Gwyneth Paltrow cracks a coronavirus joke: ‘I’ve already been in this movie’


    Gwyneth Paltrow played patient zero of a viral epidemic in “Contagion.”(Claudette Barius / Warner Bros.)
    By CHRISTIE D’ZURILLASTAFF WRITER
    FEB. 26, 2020 12:02 PM

    Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Hudson are among those locking it down in the air when it comes to the coronavirus. At least they think they are.

    “En route to Paris. Paranoid? Prudent? Panicked? Placid? Pandemic? Propaganda? Paltrow’s just going to go ahead and sleep with this thing on the plane,” the Goop founder said on Instagram, where she posted a picture of herself on a flight wearing an appropriately stylish Airinum+Nemen mask.

    “I’ve already been in this movie,” she said. “Stay safe. Don’t shake hands. Wash hands frequently.”

    Paltrow was joking about her role in “Contagion,” the 2011 Steven Soderbergh film where she played a Midwestern woman who stops for a fling on her way from a business trip in Hong Kong, only to die soon after she gets home, much to movie-husband Matt Damon’s dismay. Her patient-zero affliction quickly turns into a global pandemic.

    gwynethpaltrow
    Verified




    gwynethpaltrow's profile picture
    gwynethpaltrow
    Verified
    En route to Paris. Paranoid? Prudent? Panicked? Placid? Pandemic? Propaganda? Paltrow’s just going to go ahead and sleep with this thing on the plane. I’ve already been in this movie. Stay safe. Don’t shake hands. Wash hands frequently. 😷
    Hudson, meanwhile, posted a shot of herself in what appears to be a surgical mask, tagging her picture with the caption, “Travel. 2020.”

    Commenters were quick to note that her mask wouldn’t do much good when it came to protecting her from coronavirus. Frequent soap-and-water hand-washing, experts say, is a better preventative measure.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the role of such face masks is “patient source control,” to prevent contamination of the surrounding area when a person who has contracted the virus coughs or sneezes.

    katehudson
    Verified



    katehudson's profile picture
    katehudson
    Verified
    Travel. 2020. #😳
    Paltrow’s mask, however, was the equivalent of an N95-filtering facepiece respirator, the medical version of which, the CDC says, is recommended for healthcare professionals and could wind up in short supply in a pandemic.

    Paltrow’s reusable, $99 limited edition Urban Air Mask 2.0 is currently sold out, along with everything else on the Airinum website, but the company has a wait list going. According to its maker, the mask “combines Scandinavian minimalist design with Italian textile and dyeing research,” neither of which has anything to do with virus transmission.

    (Incidentally, the respirator appears to match the actress’ eye mask, which might be the same black silk one that’s available on the Goop website for $50.)

    More seriously, the CDC has chimed in via Instagram as well.

    “While #CDC considers #COVID19 a serious situation and is taking preparedness measures, the immediate health risk in the U.S. is thought to be low, based on what we know,” the government agency said. “Everyone should always take simple daily precautions to help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses. Learn more at www.cdc.gov.”

    cdcgov
    Verified




    cdcgov's profile picture
    cdcgov
    Verified
    While #CDC considers #COVID19 a serious situation and is taking preparedness measures, the immediate health risk in the U.S. is thought to be low, based on what we know. Everyone should always take simple daily precautions to help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses. Learn more at www.cdc.gov. #publichealth #coronavirus

    Christie D’Zurilla
    Christie D’Zurilla covers breaking entertainment news. A USC graduate, she joined the Los Angeles Times in 2003 and has 30 years of journalism experience in Southern California.
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  11. #41
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    Naomi Campbell

    Naomi Campbell Found This Meditative Workout to Be Surprisingly Hard

    Naomi Campbell has always been one to look for variety in her workouts. You'll find her crushing high-intensity TRX training and boxing in one sweat sesh and low-impact resistance band exercises in the next. But she recently found a passion for a more meditative form of exercise: Tai Chi.

    Provided by Shape Ian West/PA Images via Getty Images
    In the latest episode of her weekly YouTube series No Filter with Naomi, the supermodel chatted with Gwyneth Paltrow about all things health and wellness, including what their fitness routines have looked like lately.

    Similar to Campbell, the Goop guru said she likes to mix things up in her workout routine. Paltrow said her main goal with fitness these days is to "process things" mentally as she moves, whether that's through yoga, walking, hiking, or even dancing. "[Exericse is] part of my mental and spiritual wellness as much as my physical wellness," she told Campbell. (FYI: Here's why you might not want to do the same workout every day.)

    Campbell seems to share a similar philosophy on the connection between mental and physical health. She told Paltrow that she recently got into Tai Chi — a practice that's all about harnessing your spiritual and mental energy — after a 2019 trip to Hangzhou, China.

    During the trip, Campbell explained, she couldn't sleep due to "terrible jet lag" and soon found herself waking up early to go to a nearby park where women were practicing Tai Chi. The fashion icon said she decided to join in, even though she'd never tried the martial arts practice before.

    "I know I don't know what I'm doing, but I'm gonna just go and move with them," she recalled. "I see these women have such vitality, and they're older women. I wanna get out there and get some of what they've got going."

    "I really enjoyed Tai Chi," added Campbell. "I thought it was gonna be easy, but it's so disciplined. You've got to hold everything, it's got to be slow-moving. But I loved it — mentally, I loved it." (Here are some other martial arts practices to add to your fitness routine.)


    Video player from: YouTube (Privacy Policy, Terms)
    In case you're not that familiar with Tai Chi, the centuries-old practice is all about connecting your movement to your mind. And while it might not look as intense as your typical HIIT sesh at first glance, you'll quickly see why Campbell found it surprisingly challenging.

    In Tai Chi, "you're really paying attention to how the pieces of your body connect efficiently," Peter Wayne, Ph.D., director of the Tree of Life Tai Chi Center and associate professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, previously told Shape. "In that sense, it's a nice addition to other exercises, because that awareness may prevent injury."

    Though there are several different styles of Tai Chi, in a typical U.S.-based class, you'll likely go through long, slow sequences of movement, working on balance and strength as you harness your internal energy and remain focused on your breath.

    Research suggests that a regular Tai Chi practice can not only provide psychological benefits — including a reduction in stress, anxiety, and depression — but that it's also great for bone health and can even help reduce osteoarthritis pain. (Yoga has some major bone-boosting benefits, too.)

    Even if you don't get to practice Tai Chi with a group of strangers in a park anytime soon, both Campbell and Paltrow are all about treading unfamiliar territory when it comes to fitness — which is an especially important mindset to have in an era of working out in your living room.

    "The most important lesson there is just to know yourself and know what you're capable of and not," said Paltrow. "If you wanna do different things, you should just explore whatever, as long as you're feeling like you're doing something that's working for you."
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  12. #42
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    Gwyneth Paltrow’s ‘vagina’ candle reportedly explodes in UK woman’s home
    By Yaron Steinbuch

    January 18, 2021 | 2:37pm


    Gwyneth Paltrow's This Smells Like My Vagina” candle did more damage than expected when it reportedly burst into flames and exploded in a UK woman's home.

    Theo Wargo/WireImage
    This Gwyneth Paltrow candle didn’t pass the smell test, according to a report.

    A “This Smells Like My Vagina” candle that the actress peddles on Goop exploded into flames in the living room of a UK woman who won the odoriferous product in a quiz, the Sun reported.

    “The candle exploded and emitted huge flames, with bits flying everywhere,” Jody Thompson, 50, told the outlet.

    “I’ve never seen anything like it. The whole thing was ablaze and it was too hot to touch. There was an inferno in the room,” the media consultant from Kilburn, North London, added.

    Thompson, who lives with her partner, David Snow, said they threw the flaming candle out the front door.

    “It could have burned the place down. It was scary at the time, but funny looking back that Gwyneth’s vagina candle exploded in my living room,” she said.

    Scent notes include geranium, citrusy bergamot, and cedar absolutes juxtaposed with Damask rose and ambrette seed, according to her online store.


    A Gwyneth Paltrow “This Smells Like My Vagina” candle reportedly ignited in a UK woman’s home. The scent of the actual explosion was not reported.
    Goop
    “This candle started as a joke between perfumer Douglas Little and GP,” reads the website. “The two were working on a fragrance, and she blurted out, “Uhhh..this smells like a vagina’ — but evolved into a funny, gorgeous, sexy, and beautifully unexpected scent. (That turned out to be perfect as a candle.)”

    A Goop spokeswoman told The Post in a statement that Thompson’s candle wasn’t purchased through the outlet so “we aren’t able to verify its authenticity.”

    “However, the factory that manufactures the goop x Heretic candles is certified by The National Candle Association of America, which regulates that candles meet stipulated safety guidelines and ASTM and CPSC fire safety protocols,” Noora Raj Brown said in an email.

    “As a precaution, we’ve alerted the manufacturer to the woman’s issue and have also reached out to her to send her some goop products to help pass the days in quarantine,” she added.
    There's a vid of Gwyneth talking about her candle.
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  13. #43
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    goop ********

    'goop ********' just doesn't sound right...

    OMG
    Gwyneth Paltrow Jokes About Passing ‘the Time’ in Quarantine by Creating Goop ********, Teases It’s ‘All the Buzz’

    By Johnni Macke February 15, 2021

    Good vibrations! Gwyneth Paltrow joked about why she created the Goop ******** this year, before poking fun at herself in the name of product promotion.

    Goop launched its first ******** on Sunday, February 14, and Paltrow, 48, had a lot to say about the sexy item. After poet Cleo Wade called the actress an “icon” for spending the coronavirus quarantine “creating her own ********,” Paltrow replied via her Instagram Story, writing, “Had to pass the time, you know?”

    The Shakespeare in Love actress also jokingly posted a photo of herself from the 1999 Academy Awards, replacing her Oscar with the ********. “Beat you to it … I know how to meme too, guys,” Paltrow captioned the photo on Valentine’s Day. “Head to @goop to see what all the buzz is about.”

    [IMG]https://www.usmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Gwyneth-Paltrow-Creates-Goop-********-Had-to-Pass-the-Time-in-Quarantine.jpg[/IMG]
    Gwyneth Paltrow ETIENNE LAURENT/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

    “Omg ��,” Wade, 31, commented on the snap. Drew Barrymore added, “Oh my god I love you.”

    Fashion editor Elizabeth Saltzman reacted to the photoshopped image, writing, “Good vibrations!!!❤️❤️❤️ or should I say GOOP VIBRATIONS ������.”

    Goop’s announcement of the product included an equally cheeky caption. “We’ve tested a lot of ********s over the years — a job we take seriously, knowing that great ********s lead to great orgasms. Basically, it’s a pleasure,” the company wrote via Instagram. “We’re excited to formally introduce you to our Double-Sided Wand ********.”

    According to the website, the sex toy features eight pulsating patterns on both sides of the wand and costs $95.

    “Every detail is deliberate and precise, but we’d be lying if we said that using the ******** gives us the sensation we thought it would,” the description reads. “The truth is: It still shocks us. It packs way more power and delivers deeper pleasure than anything we’ve tried before. Although we may have dabbled in hyperbole once or twice, after you give this ******** a whirl, you may accuse us of understatement.”

    Paltrow has a history of creating controversial products for Goop, including the This Smells Like My Vagina and This Smells Like My Orgasm candles.

    The Iron Man actress, who previously revealed that the candles started as a “joke,” told Us Weekly about the real reason behind her headline-catching scents in September 2020.

    “You grew up getting messaging around the feminine care that was heavily scented with synthetic fragrances and all this kind of thing,” Paltrow exclusively told Us. “I just felt it was time to make a bit of a feminist statement around accepting who we are and our femininity. I feel like once people get past the initial shock of it, and you really start to unpack what it means and what it’s saying, it’s pretty cool.”
    Oh WTH?! Our forum censors vibrat0r? Cancel culture at work again!

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  14. #44
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    I'd take kimchee over bleach

    Gwyneth Paltrow ripped by health official for new-age advice to treat COVID
    By Lee BrownFebruary 25, 2021 | 7:48am

    Stephen Powis, the national medical director of England's National Health Service, said influencers like Gwyneth Paltrow have a "duty of responsibility" to share real science.
    Stephen Powis, the medical director of England's National Health Service, said influencers like Gwyneth Paltrow have a "duty of responsibility" to share real science.Ian Tuttle/Getty Images for goop

    Gwyneth Paltrow is being ripped by British health officials for pushing unscientific claims that “long COVID” can be treated by fasting, taking regular infrared saunas and eating lots of kimchi.

    The 48-year-old actress recently touted her new-age advice on her site Goop after revealing she caught COVID-19 “early on” and was left with “long-tail fatigue and brain fog.”

    She said a “functional medicine practitioner” put her on a “keto and plant-based” diet with kimchi and kombucha — and fasting until at least 11 a.m. each day.

    Professor Stephen Powis, the national medical director of England’s National Health Service, slammed the Oscar winner, saying influencers have a “duty of responsibility” to share real science.

    “In the last few days I see Gwyneth Paltrow is unfortunately suffering from the effects of COVID. We wish her well, but some of the solutions she’s recommending are really not the solutions we’d recommend in the NHS,” Powis told the BBC.

    “We need to take long COVID seriously and apply serious science. All influencers who use social media have a duty of responsibility and a duty of care around that.


    Paltrow claimed that fasting, taking regular infrared saunas and eating lots of kimchi can treat COVID-19.
    Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images for Baby2Baby
    “Like the virus, misinformation carries across borders and it mutates and it evolves. So I think YouTube and other social media platforms have a real responsibility and opportunity here.”

    Paltrow, who said a test revealed she had “high levels of inflammation in my body,” also said she tries to enjoy an “infrared sauna as often as I can, all in service of healing.”

    In 2018, Goop agreed to pay a substantial settlement over unproven claims about the health benefits of the infamous vaginal eggs it was selling. It has also been investigated for pushing unscientific advice.
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  15. #45
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    A queen of clickbait

    MARCH 13, 2021 9:00am PT by Chris Gardner

    Gwyneth Paltrow Responds to COVID-Remedy Criticism: "That Becomes Clickbait"

    Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images for Goop; Courtesy of brand (3); Courtesy of Rodale Books.
    Gwyneth Paltrow posted products on goop that helped clean up her diet, this after experiencing “long-tail fatigue and brain fog” post-COVID.

    The actress featured regimens and products for feeling better, which the U.K. National Health Service’s Stephen Powis has decried: "We need to take long COVID seriously and apply serious science."
    Gwyneth Paltrow played patient zero in Contagion, Steven Soderbergh's 2011 viral thriller that, in some ways, foreshadowed aspects of life during the COVID-19 pandemic. But here's a storyline nobody saw coming: Paltrow revealed in a Goop blog post that she battled coronavirus "early on" and it left her with "some long-tail fatigue and brain fog."

    Though there were rumblings that Paltrow held off on confirming her illness due to Contagion comparisons, she tells The Hollywood Reporter that's not true. "I got it so early that there weren't COVID tests available," she told THR of the illness, which she previously said she likely contracted on a trip to Paris. "We couldn't even get tested for a long time, and by the time we were able to get antibody tests and all of that, there were much graver, more important things going on in the world. I didn't really feel the need to bring it up, but it was interesting."

    When she posted the news on Goop, it came accompanied by a list of products that Paltrow promoted as key to feeling better including a mostly keto and plant-based "but flexible" diet and no sugar or alcohol along with infrared sauna treatments. She praised functional medicine practitioner Dr. Will Cole and his book Intuitive Fasting, Madge's vegan daikon kimchi, Seedlip's nonalcoholic cocktail line and vitamin D3 supplements. "At goop, we always love to talk about the capacity for the body to heal itself when you give it the right conditions to do that," wrote Paltrow.


    Warner Bros./Pictorial Press Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo
    Paltrow in 'Contagion'
    But her recommendations caught the eye Stephen Powis, national medical director of England's National Health Service, who says her wellness pitches are "really not the solutions we'd recommend." He added: "We need to take long COVID seriously and apply serious science. All influencers who use social media have a duty of responsibility and a duty of care around that."

    Asked whether criticisms like Powis' reach Paltrow, she said, "Sometimes, but it's usually that I always find it's for their own amplification. We really are not to say at goop that we have never made mistakes because of course we have in the past, but we're very much in integrity and we're careful about what we say. We always feel like we understand why a lot of that [criticism] becomes clickbait for people."

    As for how she's feeling now, during an interview to support her partnership as the global face of anti-wrinkle injection line Xeomin, Paltrow said she's feeling good and "getting there."

    "I also think that nine months in quarantine with having pasta and cake and alcohol seven days a week probably didn't help. So, I've been on a really great clean eating routine and then teetotalling for a couple of months now, and that always really helps with anything that's going on in the body."

    A version of this story first appeared in the March 10 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine

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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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