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Thread: Solo: A Star Wars Story

  1. #1
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    Solo: A Star Wars Story



    The Man Who Would Be Han Solo
    Meet Alden Ehrenreich, the actor who was discovered by Steven Spielberg,
    and is a favorite of Warren Beatty, George Clooney and the Coen brothers.

    By MATTHEW SCHNEIERMAY 6, 2016

    The most repeated story about the career of Alden Ehrenreich, an actor whose name is worth committing to memory now, is a story of discovery, a miracle of luck and circumstance not unlike Lana Turner’s at the soda fountain.

    But because Mr. Ehrenreich, 26, is a young Jewish prince of the Palisades and our story begins in the early aughts, the soda fountain is a Los Angeles bat mitzvah and the discoverer is Steven Spielberg.

    Mr. Ehrenreich is used to retelling the details, he said, though over the years, people have become more and more apologetic about asking for them again.

    The broad strokes are these: At the age of 13, noodling around with a video camera, he and a friend made a funny video for the bat mitzvah of a friend of a friend. It was a surreal and haphazardly plotted love story, which began in the present and eventually cut to 20 or 30 years later, with Mr. Ehrenreich, in a kimono, screaming to stop a wedding.


    Mr. Ehrenreich as Hobie Doyle in “Hail, Caesar!” Credit Universal Pictures

    “When we showed it to our parents, they said, ‘You look like a moron, you can’t let anyone see this,’” Mr. Ehrenreich said.

    He was not even at the bat mitzvah where it was screened, but Mr. Spielberg was. A call from DreamWorks, the studio Mr. Spielberg helped found, and a meeting with its casting director followed.

    Mr. Ehrenreich’s progress has been slower than that overnight-sensation story would suggest.

    After the video, he spent years auditioning, bagging stray cameos on procedurals and in teen-friendly TV shows. He built himself up by gradual persistence, and though his name is not yet immediately familiar to you, it is to a handful of Hollywood heavyweights: Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen, the Coen Brothers, Warren Beatty.

    “I think you’ve chosen a good person to be writing about,” Mr. Beatty said when a reporter called, citing Mr. Ehrenreich’s “unusual combination of sensitivity and intelligence and humor.” “My feeling is that he is going to be a major player in movies.”

    That may happen sooner than later. Mr. Ehrenreich is suddenly being discussed all over Hollywood, as trade papers and gossip columns on both coasts trumpeted this week that he has landed the role of Star Wars’ Han Solo in the coming Solo standalone movie, scheduled for 2018, rumors of which have circulated for weeks. When asked, Mr. Ehrenreich said he could not say anything about it, though he did cop to being a Star Wars fan. (“Who isn’t?” he said. Star Wars vs. Star Trek? “Probably both.”) A representative for Disney, which distributes the Star Wars films and owns Lucasfilm, which produces them, declined to comment.


    “When you watch a lot of movies as a kid, the stories do shape a little bit how you view the world,” Mr. Ehrenreich said. Credit Jake Michaels for The New York Times

    Before then — most likely — Mr. Ehrenreich will star in Mr. Beatty’s long-gestating film about two young strivers who arrive in Hollywood to work for the mogul Howard Hughes. (Mr. Beatty has had it in mind since the 1970s.) In April it was reported that the film would be released this fall, though Mr. Beatty said that a date had not been chosen.

    Mr. Ehrenreich’s rise comes after a few starts that stalled. “Tetro,” a modest family drama by Mr. Coppola, was warmly received but played at only 16 theaters in the United States at its widest release. “Beautiful Creatures,” a big-budget supernatural teen romance, fizzled.

    Then came Joel and Ethan Coen’s back-lot comedy, “Hail, Caesar!,” with a star-making turn for Mr. Ehrenreich.

    “Hail, Caesar!” is a loving sendup of old Hollywood, a jaunty caper of kidnapping and Communist intrigue set at Capitol Pictures, a fictional studio. Its plot functions mostly as a way to cram a variety of 1950s studio-system genre flicks and scenery-chewing actors into a dizzy pastiche.

    George Clooney does his best Charlton Heston in “Hail, Caesar!,” a “Ben-Hur”-ish film within the film. Scarlett Johansson vamps as an Esther Williams-style mermaid. Channing Tatum tap-dances a ****erotic homage to Gene Kelly.


    Mr. Ehrenreich, center, with Rodrigo de la Serna, left, and Vincent Gallo in “Tetro.” Credit Alicia Schemper/American Zoetrope

    Even in such company, Mr. Ehrenreich stood out. As the cowboy crooner Hobie Doyle, a Western actor shoehorned into a prim drawing-room comedy called “Merrily We Dance” (another film within the film), he made off with entire scenes.

    He went nose to nose with Ralph Fiennes in what may be the film’s most endearing bit of shtick: a painstaking elocution lesson in which a country boy butchers a line (“Would that it were so simple!”) in attempted mid-Atlantic English.

    “Hail, Caesar!” — the Coen brothers’ film, rather than the Capitol Pictures one — was met with mixed response (though it was a hit with many critics, wise to the countless Hollywood in-jokes). But Mr. Ehrenreich in particular, who took lessons in rope tricks (with both lasso and spaghetti), horseback riding, guitar and gun slinging to prepare, earned raves.

    “Charming,” The New York Times wrote. “Superb,” Variety wrote.

    “Alden is the kind of actor that steals every scene he’s in,” Mr. Clooney wrote in an email. “It’s so much fun to watch how hard he works and how effortless it seems.”

    Hobie Doyle would seem an odd choice for Mr. Ehrenreich, a kid from Los Angeles (he attended the Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences, in Santa Monica, Calif., where Jonah Hill and Jack Black were also students). He campaigned for an audition and won the role — in part, one suspects, because he has such an affinity with old Hollywood himself.
    continued next post
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    Continued from previous post


    Cotton shirt by 3x1, $265 at Saks Fifth Avenue, Beverly Hills, 9634 Wilshire Boulevard, 310-275-4211; silk, cotton and linen pants by Brunello Cucinelli, price on request at Brunello Cucinelli, 136 Greene Street, 212-334-1010; belt by Barneys New York, $105 at select Barneys New York stores and barneys.com; calfskin sneakers by Louis Leeman, $750 at Louis Leeman, 793 Madison Avenue, 212-879-0538. Styling by Ilaria Urbinati. Grooming by Barbara Guillaume for Art Department. Credit Jake Michaels for The New York Times

    Unlike many of his contemporaries vying to be X-Men or rom-com heartthrobs, Mr. Ehrenreich resembles the stars of an earlier era. At 26, his hair is already silvering, as if by force of will. Raised by movie-buff parents, Mr. Ehrenreich speaks worshipfully of Paul Newman and Jimmy Stewart, Frank Capra and Elia Kazan.

    “When you watch a lot of movies as a kid, the stories do shape a little bit how you view the world,” he said.

    Mr. Ehrenreich spent a few years at New York University but left in 2011, without completing a degree. Film was always the goal. “I just had a feeling of ‘I know what I want to do, and I want to start doing it again,’” he said.

    In effect, he put himself through his own film school with Mr. Coppola, with whom he lived for weeks while preparing for “Tetro.” “I was young enough that I didn’t know not to pepper him with questions all day long, so that’s all I did,” Mr. Ehrenreich said. “All day long, I’m like, ‘What was Robert Duvall like? What was Pacino like?’ It was the greatest mentorship I could have ever imagined from essentially my favorite director of all time.”

    He repeated the process with Mr. Beatty, over hourslong meetings and lunches at the Musso & Frank Grill in Hollywood.

    When Mr. Ehrenreich got the “Tetro” role, he had appeared in zero films. But he impressed one of its executive producers, Fred Roos, who has worked with Mr. Coppola on casting and production since “The Godfather.”

    “I think he can be a real star,” Mr. Roos said. “You will build movies around him. I think he’s talented enough to bring off anything. One of my oldest friends in the business, who’s a movie star that never fit any mold, is Jack Nicholson. Alden kind of has the Jack personality from the get-go.”

    Mr. Ehrenreich is not a star, yet. Despite the accolades for “Hail, Caesar!” his day-to-day life is not radically different. He still goes most days to the one-room office he rents in West Hollywood to read scripts and write, on the lot where, by coincidence, “Hail, Caesar!” was shot. (It is the site of the original United Artists, the studio founded by Mr. Chaplin and others.)

    The office is so sparsely furnished as to be Kafkaesque, bare but for a cheap desk and two office chairs, an AM/FM radio and a college-dorm mini fridge plugged into one wall. The only bit of décor, balanced facedown against one wall, is the oversize prop poster for “Lazy Ol’ Moon,” a Hobie Doyle western glimpsed in “Hail, Caesar!”

    Mr. Ehrenreich walks to work. The paparazzi have not yet noticed.

    “Things changed a little bit, maybe, professionally, but I’m learning how much you are always ignorant of what the life of something is outside of it,” he said. “It starts from zero every time. Every time you finish, you’re unemployed.”

    But whether he is aware of it, people are watching, inside the industry and outside of it. He has already shot the Iraq war drama “The Yellow Birds,” and Mr. Beatty’s film, whenever it arrives, will likely bring Mr. Ehrenreich even more attention. “I think it’ll be a real step up for him, as far as things being offered to him,” said Mr. Roos, who saw it in a private screening.

    So for now, he is adjusting to life on the cusp of stardom.

    “You get used to it, though I don’t think you ever really get used to it,” he said of seeing himself onscreen. “I remember the first time with ‘Tetro.’ It’s like when you look in the mirror at the end of a long day: That’s who I was all day? And it’s that, times 10.”
    They should have got the kid who played Young Indiana Jones. Ok, not, just kidding. I don't even remember who that kid was (and I'm not bothering with IMDB to find out).
    Gene Ching
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    Lando

    I keep reading Donald Glover as Danny Glover and then try to imagine him as Lando.

    'Atlanta' star Donald Glover to play young Lando Calrissian in 'Star Wars' spin-off
    By Alyssa Pereira Updated 3:36 pm, Friday, October 21, 2016


    IMAGE 1 OF 32 ATLANTA, GA - AUGUST 25: Actor Donald Glover attends the 'Atlanta' Atlanta screening at Georgia Aquarium on August 25, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia.

    "Atlanta" creator and star Donald Glover has been cast as a young Lando Calrissian in a forthcoming "Star Wars" spin-off alongside Alden Ehrenreich as Han Solo.
    Glover grew to fame on television while starring in NBC's "Community" and in the music world rapping under the moniker Childish Gambino. Today he stars in and executive produces "Atlanta" for FX.
    Not much is known yet about the as of yet untitled "Star Wars" flick, but an announcement on StarWars.com offers some clues.
    "This new film depicts Lando in his formative years as a scoundrel on the rise in the galaxy's underworld," the post reads, noting that the plot takes place "years before" the events involving Han, Leia, and Darth Vader in "Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back."
    "We're so lucky to have an artist as talented as Donald join us," said Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, the film's directors. "These are big shoes to fill, and an even bigger cape, and this one fits him perfectly, which will save us money on alterations. Also, we'd like to publicly apologize to Donald for ruining Comic-Con for him forever."
    The new Han Solo film featuring Glover will hit theaters in 2018.

    Read Alyssa Pereira's latest stories, and follow her on Twitter at @alyspereira.
    Send her news tips at apereira@sfchronicle.com.
    Gene Ching
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    Red Cup

    That's kind of funny.

    Star Wars: Red Cup Han Solo Working Title Logo Revealed, And What It Tells Us
    Lucas Siegel- 01/30/2017
    Newsletter

    In a twitter post announcing the official start of principal photography for Han Solo: A Star Wars Story (not official title), director Chris Miller, who is directing alongside Phil Lord, also revealed the logo for the working title: Red Cup (it's a pun on red plastic cups by the company... Solo). Yes, even the working title gets its own Star Wars logo, though it's uncertain whether it indicates anything about the film.


    The logo, like the first logo revealed for Episode VIII, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, is in red - something analyzed quite a bit last week when that logo was revealed, but here likely just indicative of the "red cup" moniker. The fonts chosen tell a little more of a story, though; while "Star Wars" is in the typical font for those words, the words "Red Cup" are in big, blocky bold letters that look like they belong in the title card of an old Western. Fans of those films, which were frequently cited as a major influence for George Lucas on the original Star Wars movies, can no doubt picture titles like "Fistful of Dollars" or "High Noon" written in this exact font.


    (Photo: Chris Miller / Lucasfilm)

    While we don't know much at all about the plot of Han Solo, we do know that the time it takes place, the "Dark Times" period between the prequel and original trilogies, featured a Han Solo that was an all-out outlaw, making his way across the galaxy as a smuggler, long before he'd joined up with any kind of Rebellion. With the focus being on high-flying adventure, and with characters like Han and Lando involved meaning there has to be at least one major heist, it makes sense that it would also lean much more heavily toward a Western influence than the typical mix of Westerns, war serials, and Samurai epics that Star Wars is known to derive from.

    The Star Wars film currently iin post-production, The Last Jedi, filmed under the production title "Space Bear: Episode VIII" and also had its own working title logo, which featured a panda bear face in the word Episode as the O.

    More Star Wars News: How New Naming Structure for Episode Movies May Reveal Secrets of The Last Jedi | Star Wars: The Last Jedi - The Other Times The New Movie Title Has Been Used | Star Wars: The Last Jedi Director Rian Johnson Teases Opening Crawl in New Still | Who is The Last Jedi? | Major Luke & Rey Reveals Coming | Does Snoke Know About The Last Jedi? | Is Tom Hardy in The Last Jedi? | Reddit User Guessed the Episode VIII Title | Star Wars: Episode VIII title revealed | Star Wars: Episode VIII Title Was Decided Long Ago | Teaser Photos

    Han Solo: A Star Wars Story is filming now under directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller for a 2018 release (no specific date has been officially announced). Alden Ehrenreich stars as a young Han Solo in the era before Star Wars: A New Hope, before he met Leia and Luke and embarked on a galaxy-saving adventure. Donald Glover also stars as Lando Calrissian, with Woody Harrelson and Emilia Clarke in as-yet-unrevealed co-starring roles.
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    A new hope

    This is interesting when you consider Howard's connection to Ford and Lucas through American Graffiti.

    JUNE 22, 2017 7:20am PT by Borys Kit, Kim Masters
    Ron Howard Steps in to Direct Han Solo Movie (Exclusive)
    Directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were let go from the project after creative differences over style and tone came to a head.


    Amanda Edwards/Getty Images
    Ron Howard

    Directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were let go from the project after creative differences over style and tone came to a head.

    The Millennium Falcon has a new pilot.

    Ron Howard has been named as the new director of Lucasfilm and Disney's untitled Han Solo movie, sources tell The Hollywood Reporter exclusively. The official announcement is expected Thursday morning.

    The move comes two days after directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were let go from the movie they had spent over four-and-a-half months directing. Creative differences over style and tone came to a head between the duo and Lawrence Kasdan, with the studio backing the veteran screenwriter.

    The firing sent shockwaves around Hollywood and beyond as the movie was about three-quarters through principal photography and the replacement of a director at that stage is near-unprecedented. The movie was scheduled to shoot for three and a half more weeks, with five weeks of reshoots built into the schedule — the latter a standard procedure on large franchise productions.

    Howard, sources tell The Hollywood Reporter, will meet with the actors — Alden Ehrenreich is playing the iconic smuggler, Donald Glover is playing Lando Calrissian, with Woody Harrelson, Emilia Clarke and Thandie Newton also on the roll call — to soothe a rattled set and will pore over a rough edit to see what the project needs. Filming will resume on July 10.

    Howard, who directed 1995's Apollo 13 and won an Oscar for helming 2002's A Beautiful Mind, comes to the Han Solo film with several connections to George Lucas and the worlds of Lucasfilm. He appeared in Lucas' 1973 breakout film American Graffiti and helmed Lucas' 1988 pet fantasy project Willow. Howard also revealed on a podcast in 2015 that Lucas had approached him to direct 1999's Star Wars prequel The Phantom Menace.

    Though his recent movies, including Inferno and In the Heart of the Sea, have been costly ventures that underperformed at the box office, Howard is considered to be a safe choice to complete the task, someone who will ably finish the movie while being a calming presence on set.

    "At Lucasfilm, we believe the highest goal of each film is to delight, carrying forward the spirit of the saga that George Lucas began 40 years ago," said Kathleen Kennedy, president of Lucasfilm, in a statement. "With that in mind, we're thrilled to announce that Ron Howard will step in to direct the untitled Han Solo film. We have a wonderful script, an incredible cast and crew and the absolute commitment to make a great movie."

    Howard is repped by CAA.

    The untitled Han Solo film is slated for release on May 25, 2018.
    Gene Ching
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    Why The New Han Solo Movie Needs Ron Howard

    Gene Ching
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    a Disturbance in the Franchise

    JUNE 26, 2017 6:00am PT by Kim Masters
    'Star Wars' Firing Reveals a Disturbance in the Franchise
    New details emerge from the set of the troubled Han Solo movie (an editor fired, a last-minute acting coach hired) as insiders debate whether problems trace to directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller, or if the Disney and Lucasfilm series can accommodate divergent styles.


    Courtesy of Fox
    Chris Miller (left) and Phil Lord

    New details emerge from the set of the troubled Han Solo movie (an editor fired, a last-minute acting coach hired) as insiders debate whether problems trace to directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller, or if the Disney and Lucasfilm series can accommodate divergent styles.
    Matters had already reached a boiling point in mid-June when Phil Lord and Chris Miller, co-directors of the still-untitled young Han Solo movie, were in the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon but didn’t start shooting until 1 p.m. That day the two used only three different setups — that is, three variations on camera placement — as opposed to the 12 to 15 that Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy had expected, according to sources with knowledge of the situation. Not only was the going slow, but the few angles that had been shot did not provide a wealth of options to use in editing the movie.

    This was hardly the first time Kennedy was unhappy with how the film was progressing. And as he looked at dailies from his home in Los Angeles, Lawrence Kasdan — screenwriter, executive producer and keeper of the Stars Wars flame — also was said to be displeased.

    Meanwhile, Lord and Miller, the exceptionally successful team behind The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street, were chafing, too, according to a source close to them. There were "deep fundamental philosophical differences" in filmmaking styles, this person says, and the directors felt they were being given "zero creative freedom." They also felt they were being asked to operate under "extreme scheduling constraints" and "were never given enough days for each scene from the very beginning."

    Shortly after the shoot in the Millennium Falcon, on June 20, the world learned that Kennedy — with the backing of Disney studio chief Alan Horn — had taken the extraordinary step of firing Lord and Miller. Obviously, Kennedy knew this would set off a storm of publicity that no one wants or needs in any movie — especially one in the Star Wars universe, where every move is closely watched by a gigantic audience with a sense of ownership. It's rare and undesirable enough to fire any director. Firing established players like Lord and Miller, who have a fan base ready to give them the benefit of any doubt? That shocked Hollywood's most seasoned veterans.

    Anxious to avoid an outright rupture, Kennedy is said to have made attempts first to support and eventually to supplant Lord and Miller to some degree, as happened with Gareth Edwards on the troubled Rogue One. In that case, screenwriter Tony Gilroy took on significant duties with the cooperation of Edwards; in this case, sources say, Kennedy attempted to cast Kasdan in that role. Unsurprisingly, Lord and Miller were less accommodating than Edwards, still a novice, had been. Lord and Miller declined to comment, as did Kennedy.

    As soon as shooting got underway, insiders say, it started to become clear that Kennedy’s stated intention of hiring directors who would put their own spin on Star Wars movies had led to a mismatch. Some insiders say that while the talent of Lord and Miller is undeniable, nothing in their background prepared them for a movie of this size and scope. These sources say they relied too heavily on the improvisational style that served them so well in live-action comedy and animation but does not work on a set with hundreds of crewmembers waiting for direction.

    “You have to make decisions much earlier than what they’re used to,” one of these sources say. “I don’t know if it’s because there were two of them but they were not decisive.” Production department heads began to complain. While the pair appeared to listen when told of festering problems, this person says their approach did not change.

    But the source close to Lord and Miller acknowledges they have always worked in an improvisational style and not just to add comedic elements. "They collaborate closely with their actors and give them creative freedom that, in their experience, brings out the actors' best performances," this person says. "Lawrence Kasdan would not allow this and demanded that every line was said word for word. To appease him and the studio, Lord and Miller would do several takes exactly as written and then shoot additional takes."

    Matters were coming to a head in May as the production moved from London to the Canary Islands. Lucasfilm replaced editor Chris Dickens (Macbeth) with Oscar-winner Pietro Scalia, a veteran of Ridley Scott films including Alien: Covenant and The Martian. And, not entirely satisfied with the performance that the directors were eliciting from Rules Don't Apply star Alden Ehrenreich, Lucasfilm decided to bring in an acting coach. (Hiring a coach is not unusual; hiring one that late in production is.) Lord and Miller suggested writer-director Maggie Kiley, who worked with them on 21 Jump Street.

    When Kennedy felt that these measures did not get the production on track, she asked Kasdan to come to London. Kasdan is said also to have been unhappy with the limited shots and displeased that Lord and Miller were calling out lines for the actors to try from behind the monitor rather than sticking with the script that he had written in collaboration with his son. (Lord and Miller had input on the script before shooting began.) “As a writer, producer and part of Star Wars world, you get on a plane when that happens,” says a person with knowledge of the situation.
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    Continued from previous post

    But Lord and Miller were not prepared to have Kasdan become a shadow director. With an impasse reached, Kennedy finally pulled the trigger.

    Stepping in to replace directors who have been fired is not something that many filmmakers would want to do. Ron Howard is probably one of the few who could and would — at least, in this particular set of circumstances. Insiders say he was concerned about how Lord and Miller would react and has been emailing with them; another source says the two have been “very supportive, very elegant.” Howard arrives in London on June 26 and shooting, which began in February and was supposed to be completed in July, will continue into the first week of September as Howard captures new material. Still, an insider says much of what Lord and Miller shot will be “very usable.”

    How credit will be determined is up to the Directors Guild of America. What will happen next for Lord and Miller isn’t clear, but they are in demand and have an open berth waiting for them to direct The Flash for Warner Bros., if they chose to take it. (They had left that film for the Han Solo movie but could return.)

    While Kennedy declined to comment on the episode, just a year ago, THR did a Q-and-A with her that sheds light on her thinking. Kennedy discussed her belief that within major franchises, it is possible to “take artistic license and creative risks.” She added, “If all you're doing is playing it safe — trying to make the same movie over and over again — that's when the audiences say, 'Oh, this is just a moneymaking machine.’ But if it's genuinely in service to the art form, then the franchise concept is being used in a way that's exciting.”

    But at the same time, Kennedy — speaking in the context of hiring young, relatively untested directors (as opposed to established filmmakers like Lord and Miller) — said these choices were “instinctual.” And she continued with a statement that seemed, perhaps presciently, to address what may have gone awry on the Han Solo movie: “One of the things I've come to realize since I've been in this position of keeping Star Wars going is that in addition to looking for somebody who can creatively have an impact, you're really looking for leadership skills. No one steps into these big movies without being able to genuinely lead the charge with hundreds of people and [handle] the relationship with the studio. That's a very difficult thing to do, and you don't know [a person can do] that until you get to spend time and watch somebody operate.”

    There are some in the industry who see an emerging pattern suggesting that Kennedy’s appetite for creative license and risk-taking will have to be curbed. Josh Trank was dismissed from the second Star Wars stand-alone film before he even started based on problems with Fantastic Four; Edwards, who conceived of Rogue One as a dark war film, was shunted aside; and now this. For all the talk of hiring filmmakers with their own vision, observers say Kennedy and Disney may be learning that the franchise is defined by a particular set of parameters. “All of the films have been 'troubled,'" says a top executive at a rival studio. “J.J. [Abrams] was powerful enough to push back on an unrealistic start date [for the first movie], but that was a tug of war. The last one was reshot by Tony [Gilroy] for months and now this? This is a systemic problem.”

    But an insider argues that Rian Johnson (Looper) shot Star Wars: The Last Jedi, set for release in December, seamlessly, proving that the right director can execute without major interference from Lucasfilm. The search for new and interesting filmmakers will continue and for many, perhaps, the siren call of Star Wars will be impossible to resist.

    On the Han Solo movie, a high-level insider says Kennedy and Disney "were hoping for a meeting of the minds [with Lord and Miller] that never came." But if had Kennedy fired them earlier, another source says, “People would say, 'Why the hell didn’t you try to work it out?’ You’re ****ed if you do and ****ed if you don’t.”

    June 26, 4:15 p.m. A previous version of this article stated that the crew of the Han Solo spinoff broke into applause following the announcement of Ron Howard as director. In fact, these sources say the applause came at the end of the meeting in which the departure of Lord and Miller was announced and they were informed a new director would be arriving. These sources say the mood at the meeting was somber but there was applause "in support of the movie" (not in support of Lord and Miller's departure).
    Shadow Director or Phantom Menace? The Star Wars pun potential abounds.
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    Michael Kenneth Williams cut

    Bummer. Reminds me of what happened to Bai Ling with her Star Wars role, only totally different. It must really suck for any actor to be kicked off the Star Wars ride.

    AUGUST 22, 2017 2:27pm PT by Borys Kit
    Han Solo Movie Loses Michael Kenneth Williams to Reshoots


    Greg Doherty/Getty Images
    Michael Kenneth Williams

    There was no choice but to “clip-clip-clip” his character from the 'Star Wars' spinoff, said the Emmy-nominated actor.
    The effects from the director change for the Han Solo stand-alone movie continue to reverberate.

    Michael Kenneth Williams, one of the film’s actors, is now a casualty of the reshoots, with his character no longer appearing in the untitled Star Wars spinoff, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed.

    Williams played a half-human, half-animal alien in the feature, but that was before Phil Lord and Chris Miller were replaced by Ron Howard in June. The move, almost unheard of so late in a film's production, caused shooting to cease and launched an evaluation of what was already shot, before restarting with Howard at the helm in July.

    With Williams now shooting the Chris Evans spy thriller The Red Sea Diving Resort in South Africa, that proved problematic.

    “That would have required me on a plane a month ago to London, to Pinewood, to do reshoots,” Williams told Deadline. “But I’m here, on location in Africa. It’s scheduling. I’m not going to be back on the market until the end of November after [his SundanceTV series] Hap and Leonard, and for them to wait that long for me, that would have pushed back the release date.”

    There was no choice but to “clip-clip-clip” his character, said the actor, who is currently nominated for an Emmy in the outstanding supporting actor category for movie or limited series fo HBO's The Night Of.

    The Han Solo movie has seen a few other changes in the reshoots, with both Willow star Warwick Davis and Howard’s brother, Clint Howard, added to the cast.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #10
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    Solo: A Star Wars Story

    I'll update the thread title now.

    OCTOBER 17, 2017 9:15am PT by Ashley Lee
    'Star Wars': Han Solo Movie Title Revealed

    'Solo: A Star Wars Story' hits theaters May 25, 2018.

    The young Han Solo Star Wars spinoff finally has a name: Solo: A Star Wars Story.

    Ron Howard is directing the movie and revealed the title via Twitter on Tuesday.

    The Disney and Lucasfilm origin story stars Alden Ehrenreich as the iconic smuggler alongside Donald Glover as Lando Calrissian. Woody Harrelson, Emilia Clarke and Thandie Newton are also among the cast. Solo is Lucasfilm's second Star Wars stand-alone movie, following last year's Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

    Howard took over directing duties in June after filmmakers Phil Lord and Chris Miller were let go due to creative differences over style and tone between the duo and Lawrence Kasdan, the veteran screenwriter who penned the script with his son Jon Kasdan. Howard has been teasing set pieces and character hints on Twitter for the past few months, and on Tuesday he thanked the cast and crew for their hard work as production wraps up.

    Solo: A Star Wars Story hits theaters May 25, 2018. Meanwhile, there's only two months left until the next Star Wars film when The Last Jedi opens on Dec. 15.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #11
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    Solo: A Star Wars Story "Big Game" TV Spot (:45)



    There's to be another longer one later today.
    Gene Ching
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  12. #12
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    Solo: A Star Wars Story Official Teaser

    Gene Ching
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  13. #13
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    Solo: A Star Wars Story Official Trailer

    Gene Ching
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  14. #14
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    Solo in PRC

    Trying to figure a way to justify reviewing this, just in case we get offered a screener.

    APRIL 19, 2018 6:05AM PT
    ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’ Set to Hit China on May 25

    By Vivienne Chow


    CREDIT: COURTESY OF LUCASFILM LTD.

    “Solo: A Star Wars Story” has been set for release in China on the same day as in the U.S., giving the latest “Star Wars” installment a day-and-date opening in the world’s two biggest film markets.

    According to Chinese movie website Douban, “Solo” will open in North America and mainland China on May 25, ten days after its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. The Chinese title refers to the maverick lead character as “Ranger Solo.”

    Disney’s intergalactic franchise might be one of the biggest cinematic phenomena in history, but its reception in mainland China has been tepid. “The Force Awakens” (2016) grossed $124 million in the Middle Kingdom, but “Rogue One” (2017) took in just $69 million, despite having Chinese kung fu superstar Donnie Yen on board. “The Last Jedi” dropped to $42 million at the Chinese box office.

    Chinese moviegoers do not seem to be impressed by the arrival of a new chapter. One wrote on Douban: “Two-star expectations only. Better safe than sorry.”
    Gene Ching
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  15. #15
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    Knight-Errant Solo

    MAY 4, 2018 3:33AM PT
    ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’ Secures Day-and-Date China Theatrical Release
    By Patrick Frater
    Asia Bureau Chief


    CREDIT: COURTESY OF DISNEY

    “Solo: A Star Wars Story” has been confirmed for a mainland China theatrical outing on May 25, giving the spinoff film a day-and-date outing alongside North America and most of the rest of the world.

    The film has its worldwide premiere later this month, on May 15, at the Cannes Film Festival, before beginning its worldwide commercial career in a few markets from May 24. The film is directed by Ron Howard and produced by Disney’s Lucasfilm from a screenplay by Jonathan and Lawrence Kasdan.

    The original “Star Wars” franchise was not screened in China until several years after its initial release in other territories. Contemporaneous screening of the newest episodes began in the new, modern era of Chinese cinema in 2016 with the release of “The Force Awakens.” That film earned a very respectable $124 million from its Jan. 9, 2016, release.

    But without the traction and fan base that the series has elsewhere, the franchise has struggled in China to maintain those numbers. “Rogue One,” released on Jan. 6, 2017, grossed $69.5 million, and “The Last Jedi,” released on Jan. 5, 2018, slipped to $42.7 million.

    “Solo” stars Alden Ehrenreich as Solo. It also has a cast that includes Woody Harrelson, Emilia Clarke, Donald Glover, Thandie Newton, Paul Bettany, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, and Joonas Suotamo.

    The official Chinese poster released by Disney sports the title (in Chinese) “Knight-Errant Solo.” The artwork features the movie’s stars under the slogan: “Unbridled hero. Extraordinary partners.” In a move that slightly distances the new film from the main franchise movies, the new poster even uses a different Chinese font. It includes an English-language logo in the corner that simply reads “Solo: Star Wars.”

    Knight-Errant. I guess that works.
    Gene Ching
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