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Thread: Intl Talk Like a Pirate Day

  1. #1
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    Intl Talk Like a Pirate Day

    Why isn't there an International Talk Like Ninja Day? Because ninjas are silent.

    English-to-Pirate translator
    Gene Ching
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  2. #2
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    ttt 4 2014

    Happy Talk Like A Pirate Day!
    Tessa Berenson @tcberenson
    10:27 AM ET

    Ahoy, mateys!

    Today is International Talk Like A Pirate Day, an annual celebration that brings together all the swashbuckling scoundrels who set their Facebook languages to ‘English (Pirate),’ have closets full of costume eyepatches, pledge allegiance to the Jolly Roger or just want an excuse to walk around saying “Arrrrgh!” or order people to walk the plank.

    There are many ways for landlubbers to celebrate today without hitting the high seas – Krispy Kreme is offering a free doughnut to anyone who talks like a pirate, and a dozen free doughnuts to those scallywags who show up in full pirate garb. (Need to brush up on your pirate parlance? Here’s a helpful how-to.)

    After your free doughnuts, check out this Google map of all the Talk Like A Pirate Day events around the world. From free mini golf to pirate-y pub crawls, there’s sure to be something that will shiver your timbers.
    Argh. I wish I'd be knowin, err I woulda dressed up.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #3
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    ttt 4 2016!

    Thar be an extra share o' da booty for those scalawags clever enuf to post in pirate today, mateys!



    It’s Talk Like a Pirate Day—But Where Does ‘Pirate Talk’ Really Come From?
    Kate Samuelson @katesamuelson 6:00 AM ET
    Evidence suggests our modern impression of pirate speech is all down to Disney


    Shiver me timbers and walk the plank—it’s International Talk Like a Pirate Day!

    Celebrated annually on Sept. 19, the parodic yo-ho-ho-holiday gives every swashbucker and hornswaggler the opportunity to grab an eyepatch, stuff a parrot on their shoulder and yell “Arrr!” at the most unsuspecting, lily-livered of pals. Cooked up by Oregon friends John Baur (Ol’ Chumbucket) and Mark Summers (Cap’n Slappy) in 1995, it has since become a cult phenomenon, with restaurants, radio stations and social media platforms clamoring to be part of the fun.

    But it’s clear our much-loved “pirate-ese” language bears little relation to the actual speech of 17th and 18th-century buccaneers. In fact, evidence suggests that our modern impression of pirate speech is all down to Disney. Here’s why:

    Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson’s adventure novel Treasure Island was published in 1883. In 1950, the popular tale was adapted for Hollywood in what was Walt Disney’s first movie made with live actors only.

    The movie starred Robert Newton as the fictional pirate Long John Silver. His performance was certainly a memorable one; TIME’s 1950 review of Disney’s Treasure Island notes that it “offers the fun of watching an eye-rolling, lip-twitching Robert Newton as he wallows outrageously through the role of Long John Silver, one of fiction’s most ingratiating scoundrels.”

    Born in Dorset and educated in Cornwall, Newton based his pirate talk on his own native British West Country dialect. His accent might not have been far off—the south west of England has long been associated with pirates because of its strong maritime heritage; notorious pirate Blackbeard was even said to have come from Bristol, in the heart of that area.

    Newton’s iconic role as Long John Silver was so influential that a variation his West Country English became the standard for portrayals of pirates on stage and in the cinema. As historian Colin Woodard told the National Geographic in 2011, “Newton’s performance—full of ‘arrs,’ ‘shiver me timbers,’ and references to landlubbers—not only stole the show, it permanently shaped pop culture’s vision of how pirates looked, acted, and spoke.”

    So, today, when your yo-ho-ho-ing is done, sit back with a bottle of rum and spare a thought for Robert Louis Stevenson and Robert Newton—whom we have to thank for giving us the excuse to yell out “Ahoy, me Hearties!” to an unsuspecting passerby.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #4
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    ttt 4 2017

    Talk Like a Pirate Day 2017: No free Krispy Kreme doughnuts; freebie from Long John Silver's
    Updated on September 19, 2017 at 5:12 AM Posted on September 19, 2017 at 5:11 AM


    Mark Summers ("Cap'n Slappy") and John Baur ("Ol' Chumbucket"), founders of Talk Like a Pirate Day. (Contributed photo/Wikipedia)

    By Leada Gore lgore@al.com

    What? No free Krispy Kreme doughnuts on Talk Like a Pirate True? Shiver me timbers!

    Krispy Kreme won't be participating in this year's Talk Like a Pirate Day, an annual event celebrated on Sept. 19. The company said it has added other events to its schedule and won't be giving away a free dozen doughnuts to those who arrive at its stores dressed or talking like a pirate.

    "As a company, we're not repeating TLAPDay this year," the company wrote on Twitter. "Ahoy! Talk Like a Pirate Day is still a holiday and you can still have fun dressing up. However, we will not be giving away doughnuts for it."

    The company encouraged people to still join in the Talk Like a Pirate Day fun.

    "Please bring your friends, parents, grandparents and kids to dress-up. We love costumes and fun with the family. We're just not offering free doughnuts this year," the company said on Facebook.

    Pirate Day freebies, discounts

    Just because Krispy Kreme isn't in the pirate mood this year doesn't mean everyone is skipping the holiday. Here are some of the freebies and discounts for TLAPD 2017:

    Long John Silver's

    Enjoy a free deep-fried Twinkie on Sept. 19 when you share your best pirate phrases. You can also share your favorite pirate joke or phrase on the restaurant chain's Facebook page to be entered into a chance to win a $25 gift card.
    Krispy Kreme be scalawags.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #5
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    Nice overview piece by USA Today

    Fake holidays like Talk Like a Pirate Day are as old as me peg leg, savvy?
    William Cummings, USA TODAY Published 7:44 p.m. ET Sept. 18, 2017 | Updated 4:15 p.m. ET Sept. 19, 2017


    (Photo: Photo by Karl Maasdam, Karl Maasdam Photography)

    Shiver me timbers, International Talk Like a Pirate Day be upon us once again, me mateys. The silly holiday has become as popular as a chest full of Spanish doubloons since it was first conceived by two friends 22 years ago.

    Now, it feels like every day, another National (fill-in-the-blank) Day is being pushed on us by marketers, advocacy groups, tweeters and complicit journalists.

    But is Twitter to blame for "made-up" holidays? Turns out, they're nothing new. Marketers have been using holidays to promote their products since at least the 19th century. What's driven their recent explosion in popularity is a perfect combination of a huge social media market with growing numbers of Americans constructing their cultural identities à la carte.

    "Social media has been a big part of raising the awareness of these holidays," said Karen Freberg, a professor of communication at the University of Louisville who specializes in public relations strategies. "We're in an attention economy, and a lot of these brands are using these opportunities," she said. Calling something a holiday is a way to cut through some of the noise, Freberg added.

    The tale of Talk Like a Pirate Day

    Friends John Baur and Mark Summers came up with International Talk Like a Pirate Day on June 6, 1995, when they began using pirate slang while playing racquetball "for reasons we still don't quite understand," they say on their website.

    They had so much fun talking like pirates they "decided then and there that what the world really needed was a new national holiday."

    Talk Like a Pirate Day remained a buried treasure, known only to Baur, Summers and their friends until they shared the idea with Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Dave Barry. Barry plundered the booty and shared the riches with his national audience in a Sept. 8, 2002, column: "Arrrrr! Talk like a pirate or prepare to be boarded."

    "I was just looking for a column, I had no idea what was going to become of it," Barry told USA TODAY. "I'm pretty confident 50 years from now nobody will have any idea who I was, but people will still be celebrating Talk Like a Pirate Day."



    It turned out there were a lot of closet pirates around the world. It's celebrated on Sept. 19 every year.

    "It's such a stupid thing, it just naturally resonates with people," Barry said.

    The rise of National 'X' Days

    Along with Talk Like a Pirate Day has come an apparent flood of other National "X" Days, such as National Coffee Day, National Beer Day, National Underwear Day, National Doughnut Day, National Puppy Day and National Bikini Day.

    They range from the absurd (National Sneak Some Zucchini Into Your Neighbor’s Porch Day) and the overly specific (National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day) to the thoughtful (National Compliment Day) and the heartbreaking (National Tackle Kids Cancer Day).

    Often these holidays, like Talk Like a Pirate Day, were created by individuals who thought it would be fun or who wanted to bring attention to something they are passionate about. Others were spawned through popular culture, like Festivus on Dec. 23 (Seinfeld) and Galentine's Day on Feb. 13 (Parks and Recreation).

    Wherever they come from, social media has made promotion cheap and easy, and companies have taken advantage.

    The seafood chain, Long John Silver's, adopted Talk Like a Pirate Day and in past years gave away a free piece of fish to landlubbers willing to talk like a pirate. This year, they are giving away free a "bar of gold" (a deep-fried Twinkie).

    Last year was Long John Silver's biggest year celebrating the faux holiday, with 60,000 people walking through their doors to take part in the promotion, according to Hayley Marchionda Pugel, a spokesperson for the restaurant.

    “The crew at Long John Silver’s looks forward to this day every year,” said Stephanie Mattingly, Long John Silver’s marketing vice president. "We love everything from pirate jokes to a simple pirate ‘Aargh.'"

    IHOP began celebrating National Pancake Day in 2006, drawing in customers with free short stacks every March 7. The company has raised more than $24 million for charities through customers' Pancake Day donations.

    National days are also used by organizations to create awareness about issues from disease to human rights. National Red Day, observed on Feb. 3, encourages people to wear red to show support and raise money for women suffering from heart disease or stroke. On Jan. 11, people can raise awareness about modern slavery by using the hashtag #HumanTraffickingAwarenessDay.

    The success of these campaigns lies in giving consumers a way to connect with companies and brands in a positive, celebratory way, Freberg said.

    "It's a way to tap into a culture and a community," she added.

    While many establishments give away free treats this morning it is important to note the origin of this delicious doughnut day. USA TODAY
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  6. #6
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    continued from previous post

    Invented holidays are nothing new

    In many instances, the national days being promoted today were not invented in the social media age. Many were created decades ago and have been reappropriated by marketers today.

    For example, National Raisin Day was started in 1909 by the raisin growers of California. The California Raisin industry, which brought us the dancing California raisins in the 1980s, continues to promote the dried fruit's special day.



    National Doughnut Day was founded in 1938 by the Salvation Army to honor the "Doughnut Girls" who gave soldiers doughnuts along the front lines during World War I.

    National Coffee Day and National Pancake Day, on the other hand, were not observed until the 2000s.

    But, Americans are not passively being programmed and manipulated by industry propaganda, as some critics claim, historian Leigh Eric Schmidt said in his book, Consumer Rites: The Buying and Selling of American Holidays. These special days become successful because people like and adopt them.

    "Consumers embraced, 'bought,' and helped create the market versions of St. Valentine's Day, Christmas, Easter, New Year's, Mother's Day, and other holidays, imbuing these rites with their own hopes and desires, recognizing in them resonant and fluid symbols of love, family, faith, prosperity, and well-being," said Schmidt.

    It's a two-way street, in other words. If you were craving a fat, juicy burger, Monday (aka National Cheeseburger Day) would have been the perfect reason to indulge.

    Do we need a holiday from all these holidays?

    All these holidays can be a bit overwhelming. After all, if every day is a holiday, then don't holidays become meaningless?

    Even National Nothing Day — when American's are (ironically) encouraged to "sit without celebrating, observing or honoring anything" on Jan. 16 — falls on the same day as National Fig Newton Day, National Religious Freedom Day and National Without a Scalpel Day (which celebrates the invention of minimally invasive surgeries).

    "Everybody's got a certain level that they can take," said Holly McGuire, editor of Chase's Calendar of Events, an annual publication that lists thousands of special commemorations. At some point the "X Day" phenomenon could "jump the shark" and people could stop engaging, McGuire said.

    Even Congress had to take a break. It used to be lawmakers' job to establish special commemorative days, but the legislation began taking up a huge amount of time. The peak came with the 99th Congress (1985-1986), when commemorative legislation made up more than 41% of the bills passed by and signed into law by President Ronald Reagan, according to a 1999 Congressional Research Service report. By 1995, Congress was taking so much heat for the amount of time spent on those bills that the House approved a rule banning any tied to establishing commemorative dates.

    Drink up, me hearties, yo ho

    Despite the risk of overdoing it, McGuire believes the holidays are a positive thing.

    Chase's founder William Chase has "always been proud of what he calls the democratization of holidays," McGuire said. "It's not just necessarily in the hands of the government or higher a higher power. If you want to celebrate something and it takes off you can, and people can join you."

    For now, national days and their promoters are here to stay. And Milo Anderson, the founder of the National Day Calendar website, where you can look up every holiday, doesn't see anything wrong with that.

    "In a world where we're surrounded by bad news all the time, maybe this is a good thing," Anderson said. "It brings people together."

    McGuire agreed. "There's certainly a lot of serious things going on in the world right now and if you take a moment and celebrate Hug Your Cat Day, it doesn't harm anyone," she said.

    So, keep celebrating, America. And don't forget to mark April 4 on your calendar — that's National Hug A News Person Day, after all.
    It's really all about Ninja Day in Japan.... or International Ninja Day. We just like to give Pirates an equal voice here.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  7. #7
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    ttt for 2018!

    Avast ye Scallywags!


    Yo, ho, ho! International Talk Like a Pirate Day is upon us!
    By Christina Maxouris and Emanuella Grinberg, CNN
    Updated 6:55 AM ET, Wed September 19, 2018


    Captain Henry Morgan was a big deal long before he landed the gig of a lifetime as mascot of the Captain Morgan brands of spiced rum and spirits. As a Welsh privateer who fought for the English against the Spanish in the Caribbean in the 17th century, he amassed huge fleets and great wealth in raids along the Spanish Main. He was knighted by King Charles II of England and died a rich man in Jamaica.
    Photos: Pirates in pop culture

    (CNN)Aye maties, 'tis the day we've all been waiting for: International Talk Like a Pirate Day.

    But avast! Before you grab your grog and parrot, let's get ye educated!
    The idea for the day was born in 1995 on a YMCA racquetball court in Albany, Oregon. John "Ol' Chumbucket" Baur and his friend Mark "Cap'n Slappy" Summers began throwing around insults, just like pirates.
    They selected September 19, simply because Summers had recently divorced, it was his ex-wife's birthday, and he figured "the date was stuck in my head, and I wasn't going to do anything with it anymore," he told CNN in 2009.
    But it wasn't until humorist Dave Barry caught wind of the idea and threw his support behind it in a September 2002 Miami Herald column that this rickety ship took sail.
    "As the name suggests, this is a day on which everybody would talk like a pirate. Is that a great idea, or what?" Barry wrote back then. "There are so many practical benefits that I can't even begin to list them all."
    The endorsement launched a full-fledged movement that seems to grow each year. Here are some ways to get in on the action:

    Speak like a scurvy pirate (on social media)
    Yes, you can "update your plunderin," or manage your "grog fests" on Facebook in the ultimate test of pirate literacy. Go to settings and then language and select English (Pirate) in the drop-down menu.
    Pro tip: Use a pirate translator website, such as SpeakPirate, to know what you're actually saying.

    Put grub in ye gullet
    Time was, aspiring buccaneers who talked like a pirate got a free glazed doughnut at some Krispy Kreme locations. Those who went the extra mile and dressed like a pirate got a dozen free glazed doughnuts. That's not happening anymore.
    But at participating Long John Silver's outlets, you can hook a deep-fried Twinkie by talking like a pirate. If you dress like a pirate, you'll get a free fish & fry.

    Find ye pirate moniker
    No made-up holiday in the digital age would be complete without a pirate name generator, and there are plenty of them. This one seems to work pretty well.

    Happy International Talk Like a Pirate Day! And don't forget to roll your R's! Arrrrgh!
    Gene Ching
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  8. #8
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    WWE's own "Pirate Princess", Kairi Sane (a.k.a., Kairi Hojo; real name, Kaori Housako):


  9. #9
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    Blimey Captain Jimbo!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    WWE's own "Pirate Princess", Kairi Sane (a.k.a., Kairi Hojo; real name, Kaori Housako):

    Ye be a day late, matey.

    But she be a fyne lass, so we forgive ya.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #10
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    Arrrggggh

    I be so disappointed that none of ye scalawags ttt-ed this while I be on vacation yesterday.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #11
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    ttt 4 2022

    Now that the pandemic is 'over', time to say arrrrrggggghhh.
    Gene Ching
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