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Thread: Non-Pugilistic Wing Chun

  1. #16
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    No , have not developed any interest in either of those skills. Back in those days (my grandfather's generation, ( I'm 68 yrs old ) those would be the sort of skills that a Kung Fu Master in China would have kept under his hat. These days I try not to ad any new injuries that would handicap me if I needed to respond quickly to a situation (self-defense or protecting others).

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by PalmStriker View Post
    These days I try not to ad any new injuries
    a know the feeling lol

    the darts sound interesting.. could make some money down the pub lol

    i take it theres no form, just a skill?

  3. #18
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    Master Yuen Kay San would demonstrate the skill by taking out birds on the wing. To demonstrate the Red Sand Palm skill he would penetrate a burlap sack of rice with a sword -hand strike and retrieve a coin that had been placed inside.
    Last edited by PalmStriker; 07-24-2020 at 08:30 PM.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by PalmStriker View Post
    Master Yuen Kay San would demonstrate the skill by taking out birds on the wing. To demonstrate the Red Sand Palm skill he would penetrate a burlap sack of rice with a sword -hand strike and retrieve a coin that had been placed inside.
    thats up there with the atom being able to hammer in nails with his palm lol a wonder if these people were able to write in their old age

  5. #20
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    You will read about some of the things the old masters (born before 1900) would say about techniques that required extreme conditioning to pull them off, the kind of stuff you would see in the old Shaw Brothers movies. I think there was pretty much an understanding that if you did not adhere to a very strict regimen in order to develop these skills... you would end up in bad shape if you slacked off in any way. Some of these technique skills are not made public, even to this day.

  6. #21
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    I have a pdf somewhere about such methods... all of them take years to acquire... and have claims that are impossible, the writer includes a picture of his messed up hand, which he claims was because he stopped training

    l seen a video.. think it may have been on yt showing a way of conditioning your palms, without a sand bag, but using your own hands, one hand hits another.. seems a bit smarter

  7. #22
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    Hey, T.D.O. Interesting that you have mentioned the moderate practice of short range fist striking palm for conditioning to keep your hands ( bones,veins,nerves) in shape. Also striking the "back-fist" part of your hand in the same manner. These exercises make a nice splatting sound. I've been doing this for years with the addition of using a palm/fingers striking slap to the forearms (upper ridge) to condition against the pain/ temporary paralysis that can occur from an opponent's strike. Also, upper arm slaps to the upper arm ont the shoulder.
    Last edited by PalmStriker; Yesterday at 10:15 PM.

  8. #23
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by PalmStriker View Post
    Hey, T.D.O. Interesting that you have mentioned the moderate practice of short range fist striking palm for conditioning to keep your hands ( bones,veins,nerves) in shape. Also striking the "back-fist" part of your hand in the same manner. These exercises make a nice splatting sound. I've been doing this for years with the addition of using a palm/fingers striking slap to the forearms (upper ridge) to condition against the pain/ temporary paralysis that can occur from an opponent's strike.
    you know.. its something, I've never really done, I may start lol we used to slap our inner thighs in class for that reason, i kinda stuck with it for a bit.. but because i only ever done it in class, and I've not been for some time, I've forgot about it till now

  9. #24
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    Hi, PalmStriker and T.D.O:

    I’m not a Wing Chun practitioner (I’m a CLF practitioner, among other things), but I thought I’d share. I have been using a similar-sounding hand conditioning method of striking my hands against each other. I actually started doing it on my own years ago. I train the palm heels, palm edges, flat palms (for power slaps), hammer fists, and hammer fists to palm heels. Then I support my weight on my first two (index and middle finger) knuckles (similar to a push-up position, but without doing push-ups) on a linoleum floor for a couple minutes, to condition the foreknuckles and wrist alignment for straight punches. Been doing this for quite some time. Even though it’s far less extreme than many methods, I still apply jow before and after, and carefully massage, stretch, and shake out my hands, and do arm swings afterwards.

    For my forearms, I use an ‘Iron Arm Conditioning Hammer’ on the ulnar and radial (boney) sides, as well as on the muscle/back area of the forearms. Followed by hitting my forearms against each other (using light to moderate force). Also some slapping/palm heels to the forearm muscles. Again, I use jow for that, too. The only problem with the Iron Arm conditioning “hammer” is that it makes a loud clacking sound; not good if you share space with or around others. I don’t, so it’s not a problem for me.

    These methods work well. I practice them about 4 days/week.

    Two days/week, I also train grip strength. I use Heavy Grips. Not too much and not too crazy. I’m currently working on the 200-pound unit. I have others that are higher (they increase by 50 pound increments), but I’m not in a hurry to get there, and don’t want to strain or injure my hands, or develop tendinitis. I warm up for that by squeezing tennis balls and even squeezing my hands together as hard as possible for 30-second sets. You don’t want to jump into using the Heavy Grip units without warming your hands up first, and only do low reps.

    Then a couple days a week I strike a BOB dummy.

    My training isn’t nearly as much as what I did in younger years, but at 57, I would rather be able to do some training than none at all. Of course, the above isn’t all of what I do, only my own hand/forearm conditioning methods.
    Last edited by Jimbo; Yesterday at 06:30 PM.

  10. #25
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    Hey, Jimbo ! I would say you are right up there at 57 doing the workout regimen you detailed. Yeah, I like hammer fist too and will hit that into the mitt. Sounds like you could keep going like that for another ten years, easily given good health. As you get older you will loose strength gradually, as well as endurance, hut speed will always be on your side from muscle memory alone. The body conditioning stuff makes sense as your nerves and exterior skin surface absorb the contact given that is used for preventative therapy. I don't do any additional lifting as I am still working a good bit physically throughout the week at age 68. Gripping and grasping weights also good to hear about.
    Last edited by PalmStriker; Yesterday at 10:35 PM.

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