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Thread: Okinawan Karate: True Combat Art

  1. #61
    Hi buddy. I hope you and yours are doing well. I say YES. Teach them. Let them know as much as possible. Yep. it may be used against you.

  2. #62
    So fellows. I have a lot going on after the first and starting now. I'll be at best reading mode. Until next time. Everyone have a safe and happy holiday.

    I'll leave with this and with hope the lines are greatly lowered for all- http://www.classism.org/about-class/

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Agreed. I couldn't have said it better.

    The Shorin-ryu system claims roots (or at least influence) from northern Shaolin (Shorin = Shaolin), which sets it apart from other Okinawan systems if that's true. I don't know how northern style would have been studied by an Okinawan or otherwise brought to Okinawa, though some (many?) say there is an influence.

    I've known of some CMA people who previously studied karate (whether Okinawan or Japanese style) who then turned around and started putting karate down. Even though I stopped training karate decades ago and am more suited to CLF, I've never lost respect for karate or any of the other previous arts/methods I studied/was exposed to.

    Yeah, I never understood those CMA peeps that do that.
    I went from Hung Kuen to Kyokushin, to SPM and Hung Kuen again BUT I would never put done Karate.
    Karate is an amazing base/core OR as solo system, though you have to supplement it with grappling and weapons, BUT that can be said of 99% of ALL systems, including CMA.
    Fact is I progressed very quickly and well in CMA because of the karate background.
    IMO, and this is not a slight on Karate OR CMA, I find that to build a base and core that Karate is easier and that kung fu is better as a finisher.

    I found that I was able to understand and apply core principles of SPM, for example, much faster and better than other classmates because of my sold foundation in karate.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Yeah, I never understood those CMA peeps that do that.
    I went from Hung Kuen to Kyokushin, to SPM and Hung Kuen again BUT I would never put done Karate.
    Karate is an amazing base/core OR as solo system, though you have to supplement it with grappling and weapons, BUT that can be said of 99% of ALL systems, including CMA.
    Fact is I progressed very quickly and well in CMA because of the karate background.
    IMO, and this is not a slight on Karate OR CMA, I find that to build a base and core that Karate is easier and that kung fu is better as a finisher.

    I found that I was able to understand and apply core principles of SPM, for example, much faster and better than other classmates because of my sold foundation in karate.
    I've found all of this to be true. In general, the vast majority of the better CMA people I've known have had at least a solid background in karate or other non-CMA fighting art(s). I'm not really counting "kiddie karate" in this, but harder-core, adult-oriented karate, even if kids are practicing it. Besides building up a basic foundation in application and sparring/fighting, it tends to develop a habit of being more detail-oriented than many purely CMA people seem to have.

    For example, many "purely" CMA types I've seen tend to slop through combinations to get to the final punch (or kick, or whatever) for the sake of speed, 'flow' and flash. I'm not suggesting CMA should move in a karate-like rhythm, but when you really understand the intent and execution of every little detail, the movements take on a whole new aura. Then the speed and flow of movements will have an actual objective (and power) than simply for appearance. This is usually because in many cases, many purely CMA a people seem not to develop their basic skills as meticulously as those from a karate background. The habit of analyzing and understanding every movement and detail (as much as possible) is but one positive trait that can carry over from karate to CMA training.

    Another benefit is development of spirit/focus that is *sometimes* lacking in some purely CMA-trained individuals.

    On this point I would strongly disagree with Adam Hsu, who seems to suggest that "purity" in CMA is paramount. From his writings he seems to suggest that any non-CMA training or influences will pollute or destroy one's potential in CMA. Which IME is not true at all. Most of the best CMA people I've known originally came from non-CMA backgrounds. It certainly helped me to progress quickly, especially once I found teachers who emphasized the application aspect. I know for a fact that during the Chinese Republic era, many Chinese kung fu men investigated and studied judo, western boxing, and western exercise methods of the time. That was because they knew how effective they were.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 12-26-2016 at 07:58 AM.

  5. #65
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    Okinawan Karate: True Combat Art

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  6. #66
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