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Thread: Daoism

  1. #1
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    Daoism

    I am curious to know how much interest have you focused in learning about Daoism in the southern Chinese styles. And from those who learned from their original master or master of a master, how much did they know or understood about Daoism. I understand the main interest for many here is to fight for different reasons and I can imagine the same happened hundred years ago. Also, I have the impression that many old masters learned the basic of Dao and were not necessarily scholars or interested in philosophy or religion.

    Thanks,

    Mig

  2. #2
    Rooster-Earth. That's all I know.

  3. #3
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    You might try other forums...

    Hi Mig,

    I'm also fascinated with Daoism and Wudang...but not a lot of info or participation on this forum for that topic. You may want to try some other forums...there was a forum called the Rum Soaked Fist that covered Internal Martial Arts and maybe a good starting point for you.

    Just an idea guy....
    "if its ok for shaolin wuseng to break his vow then its ok for me to sneak behind your house at 3 in the morning and bang your dog if buddha is in your heart then its ok"-Bawang

    "I get what you have said in the past, but we are not intuitive fighters. As instinctive fighters, we can chuck spears and claw and bite. We are not instinctively god at punching or kicking."-Drake

    "Princess? LMAO hammer you are such a pr^t"-Frost

  4. #4
    That's to bad. I thought it would be great to see discussion on this.

  5. #5
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    I am also interested in Daoism, and have a fundamental understand of it. Like another subject that I have studied - Buddhism, it is a theology, not a religion. But I cannot say that I am well versed in both. In order to be one, the person needs to study it as a major, and practise it as his lifestyle.



    Regards,

    Steve Lau
    Hong Kong

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLau View Post
    I am also interested in Daoism, and have a fundamental understand of it. Like another subject that I have studied - Buddhism, it is a theology, not a religion. But I cannot say that I am well versed in both. In order to be one, the person needs to study it as a major, and practise it as his lifestyle.



    Regards,

    Steve Lau
    Hong Kong
    Thank you Hebrew hammer for the link. The reason why I asked this is because, I imagine that in the past before 1970, masters most likely had a good understanding of Daoism. The problem is that if we go back in history, it is much more complex as religion, philosophy, popular beliefs and practice of Daoism was not as described today. Today I have the impression that is more of new age type of thing, spiritual capitalism and whatever they want to sell in the market. Here in the US and some other western countries, I have noticed to use of ying yang, qi or bagua symbols and claim being Daoist. As I learn today, all those concepts are part of the traditional Chinese cosmology. I wonder if you have ever asked your Chinese sifu or western sifu, what is their understanding of Daoism and how is that related to their Chinese boxing style. I put aside taijiquan, baguazhang as they use more terms that are also applied in Daoism circles.
    Thanks,

  7. #7
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    My father was a taoist by adoption of the philosophy and somewhat prescribed way of life. It is not too far off from zen (ch'an) in it's point of view.

    The 81 chapters are for anyone and what can be derived of them is myriad. Chuang Tzu was a well read author in our house.

    I personally subscribe to no religion and rather see them all as being in essence the same attempt at defining meaning in life and grasping at certainty.

    Of course, there is no certainty except for an illusion of it and neither is there meaning in life unless you ascribe some to yours.

    Give your life meaning. Believe in the philosophies that help you maintain happiness , cultivate harmony and live in peace with others.
    Or not. Really, you came here all by yourself and that's how you go. Everything in between is choices. Maybe good, maybe bad.

    You can't be saved if you won't save yourself.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mig View Post
    I imagine that in the past before 1970, masters most likely had a good understanding of Daoism.
    What evidence would lead you to suspect this? Here's a question you should probably consider. What makes you think that average Chinaman's understanding of the Dao is/was any different than the average American's/Brit's/whoever's understanding of Christianity?

    People are just people. And most have too much crap to deal with day to day than to sit around reading classics and talking philosophy/religion.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCo KungFu View Post
    What evidence would lead you to suspect this? Here's a question you should probably consider. What makes you think that average Chinaman's understanding of the Dao is/was any different than the average American's/Brit's/whoever's understanding of Christianity?

    People are just people. And most have too much crap to deal with day to day than to sit around reading classics and talking philosophy/religion.
    The evidence I had was when I started practicing hunka and visited several martial arts schools that had Chinese symbolism and claimed to be Daoist. My question was about kung fu masters that may have had some affiliations to a Daoist sect or was a scholar who may have been interested in Daoism. I know that in general people don't have that kind of time to devote their time in reading classics though it is my understanding that Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism are part of the average China man. Here a cultural difference from the western world.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mig View Post
    Also, I have the impression that many old masters learned the basic of Dao and were not necessarily scholars or interested in philosophy or religion.

    Mig
    Mig, well your impression is probabley correct since some CMA are religion based. But in my case, I have studied study Daoism, Buddhism, etc. (at least their basic) not because of MA training. I have a vast range of interest. That is the reason.



    Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year

    KC
    Hong Kong

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLau View Post
    Mig, well your impression is probabley correct since some CMA are religion based. But in my case, I have studied study Daoism, Buddhism, etc. (at least their basic) not because of MA training. I have a vast range of interest. That is the reason.



    Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year

    KC
    Hong Kong
    Steve, thanks and happy holidays wherever you are. What is about Daoism and Buddhism that people get interested in practicing martial arts? I see Chinese symbolism in martial arts schools and I am not quite sure they understand or grasp the meaning of those symbols?
    Also, as a China man during those days, maybe less today in Chinese communities the ideal of 以佛治心、以道治身、以儒治世 was or still around?

  12. #12
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    Mig,

    Sure, some MA students might not understand the meaning of those symbols. Also, which comes first? Some people get interested in Daoism and Buddhism first, and then affect their decision to pick up martial arts training. The other way around is there too. I happen to be in the second group.



    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong
    Last edited by SteveLau; 01-13-2017 at 09:42 PM.

  13. #13
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    Podcast

    You might be interested in this Podcast from UCLA:

    http://www.international.ucla.edu/ccs/article/164072
    "Its better to build bridges rather than dig holes but occasionally you have to dig a few holes to build the foundation of a strong bridge."

    "Traditional Northern Chinese Martial Arts are all Sons of the Same Mother," Liu Yun Qiao

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