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Thread: Chinese Polearms and Spades

  1. #1

    Chinese Polearms and Spades

    Now, I don't know how much these relate to Kung-Fu, but can anyone help me recognize the long handled-wavy bladed sword kind of a weapon, and the spears with two squiggly bits to the sides. What are they called?
    Also, I had understood that the monk's spade was the two-headed polearm with a crescent and a shovel, though I've never seen a antique one. I found online an antique chinese spear/polearm head named a monk's spade, which is crescent in shape. Were blades like that affixed to staves for use? Are this type of blades still called monk's spades?

    Edit: I've also heard of some sort of shaolin rakes, but haven't seen anything that would look anykind of sensible. Anyone know about these?
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    Last edited by Paliandro; 04-13-2017 at 07:21 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paliandro View Post
    the long handled-wavy bladed sword kind of a weapon,
    That one isn't labeled.

    and the spears with two squiggly bits to the sides. What are they called?
    Dictionary gives: 鏜 tāng, táng; boring tool

    Also, I had understood that the monk's spade was the two-headed polearm with a crescent and a shovel, though I've never seen a antique one.
    That's a combination of two weapons/tools;

    月牙铲 yučyáchǎn (crescent moon shovel/spade), and;

    方便铲 fāngbiŕnchǎn (convenience shovel/spade).

    When combined into one, it usually takes the name of the latter, being the main head.

    "Monk's spade" is an English term, far as I know.

    I've also heard of some sort of shaolin rakes, but haven't seen anything that would look anykind of sensible. Anyone know about these?
    I'unno.

  3. #3
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    Calling a spade a spade

    For more on spades, read our May+June 2012 cover story: The Spade, the Whip and the Mountain Gate. I've not heard "Shaolin Rake" but that might also be derivative of Journey to the West as Pigsy wielded a rake.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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