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Thread: The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny by Kendrick Lamar

  1. #1
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    The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny by Kendrick Lamar

    I guess Kendrick didn't get enough Bad Blood.

    Kendrick Lamar Wraps Coachella on '****.' High Note As Alter Ego Kung Fu Kenny In Short Film
    4/17/2017 by Adelle Platon


    Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Coachella
    Kendrick Lamar performs on the Coachella Stage during day 3 of the Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival (Weekend 1) at the Empire Polo Club on April 16, 2017 in Indio, Calif.

    Three days following the release of his latest studio album ****., headliner Kendrick Lamar returned to Twitter's trending topics list after his gripping set at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on Sunday (April 16). Perhaps it was no coincidence that the rapper's performance fell on Easter Sunday as the gig felt like the grand return of Lamar himself.

    Lamar's label Top Dawg Entertainment opened the set with a special presentation of The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny, a three-part short film designed like an old-school kung fu flick (complete with subtitles) that featured the rapper as his alter-ego, Kung Fu Kenny a.k.a. Black Turtle, on a mission to "find The Glow." He takes on Snake, a cobra who morphs into a female martial artist, Mortal Kombat style. As she lay helpless on the ground following their battle, she tells Lamar, "You thought you could save the world. The Glow will shine bright in the dark."

    There was no blocking Lamar's light during his set in the desert. The MC's stage transformed into several stunning displays, shifting from a fiery refuge for the live rendition of "ELEMENT." to a wavy paradise for "GOD." He mixed ****. entries like the opener "BLOOD.," "DNA." and the U2-less "XXX." with catalog staples from previous albums like To Pimp a Butterfly's "King Kunta" and "Alright" as well as Good Kid, m.A.A.d City's "Money Trees," "Backseat Freestyle," "***** Don't Kill My Vibe" and "Swimming Pools (Drank)." For "LUST.," Kendrick Lamar rapped from the inside of an illuminated cage in the middle of the crowd, even checking in on the crowd by eerily asking, "Is anybody out there?" For "PRIDE.," Lamar was suspended in the air in a trippy, martial arts-esque stance involving another dance.

    Beyond defying gravity, the rap god also handed over the stage to special guests like his TDE cohort ScHoolboy Q, who performed "tHat Part" (he had hosted his own set on Night 2) and fellow Coachella performer Future, whose flute-heavy banger "Mask Off" made Lamar's lineup. Travis Scott, who also performed at the festival the night prior, re-emerged for a complete performance of the Birds in the Trap Sing McKnight standout "Goosebumps."

    After the final vignette of his kung fu movie where the rapper "found the motha****in' glow," King Kendrick launched into the aggressive crowd-pleaser "HUMBLE." where the call-outs "Sit down. Be humble." flashed across the screen in both English and Chinese characters. Lamar seemed to end the set on a somewhat confusing note, telling Coachella-goers "We will be back" and prompting many to make a bee line for the parking lot before the mad rush home. However, the man of the night put on one last show with the melodic number "LOVE." off ****. "Thank y'all for comin' out tonight, I really appreciate, y'all," Lamar told the crowd before his final bow. "I had a good motherf--king time with y'all."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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    The Return of Kung Fu meets Hip Hop

    'Kung Fu Kenny' Is Just the Latest Example of Hip-Hop's Fascination With Martial Arts
    BY SHAWN SETARO
    Shawn is the host of The Cipher, a critically acclaimed hip-hop podcast that conducts in-depth interviews with the genre’s most interesting and important figures. He is a regular contributor at Forbes.
    Shawn is also the former editor-in-chief of Rap Genius, and has written about music and culture for The Atlantic, Vibe, The Source, GQ, Esquire, The Sondheim Review, and more.

    APR 19, 2017

    Kendrick Lamar is a man who, for a rapper, has a comparatively short list of nicknames. But on his new album ****, his new video for "DNA," and particularly during his set this past weekend at Coachella, he's introduced a brand new one: "Kung Fu Kenny."


    Image via YouTube

    At Coachella, Lamar started his set by unveiling a short film titled The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny that was modeled after the kung fu films of the 1970s. Similar imagery, including the phrase "Kung Fu Kenny" spelled out in Chinese characters, appeared in the "DNA" video. The moniker itself seems to be inspired by Don Cheadle's character in Rush Hour, who goes by Kenny:



    But why? Why would a rap star associate himself with Hong Kong actions films released well before he was born?

    As it turns out, Kendrick is continuing a tradition that dates back to the very beginnings of hip-hop. Martial arts—in particular, martial arts as depicted in the films of the 1970s and ’80s—had a seminal influence on hip-hop culture from the start. The New York City of the 1970s that birthed hip-hop faced an economic crisis. The same forces that were burning the Bronx were also having their effects felt in the theaters of midtown Manhattan.

    Joseph Schloss, a scholar and author who wrote the book Foundation: B-boys, B-girls and Hip-Hop Culture in New York, explains that the movie theaters were feeling the pinch, so they went for the cheapest programming they could find.

    "Their best economic alternative was to buy packages of these cheap Hong Kong action movies, and just show them all day long. It was that and porno movies, basically, on 42nd Street," he tells Complex. Starting in 1981, this programming was mirrored on television as well. WNEW, channel 5 in the city, broadcast Drive-In Movie every Saturday. The program showed primarily kung fu flicks, and was a huge hit with kids. "Pretty much every single hip-hop artist that I've met from that era used to watch that show religiously," Schloss notes.


    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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    Continued from previous post



    So kung fu movies were in the theaters and on TV. But why did the kids of the era—the ones who were, as Schloss puts it, "developing their own culture"—love the films so much? What did they see in those stories?

    Adisa Banjoko, founder of the Hip-Hop Chess Federation and the author of the book Bobby, Bruce & the Bronx: The Secrets of Hip-Hop Chess, has made a life-long study of the connections between hip-hop, martial arts, and the game of chess. To him, the affinity between black youth of that era and martial arts makes perfect sense.

    "People often forget that hip-hop was born out of the ashes of the civil rights movement, and so much of that was tied to a reclamation of black male dignity," he says. "These films—Bruce Lee movies in particular, and a lot of the Shaw Brothers films—often dealt with one man going against an organization, or one man going against an unjust state. Because so much of this was done with just the hands, it was also a tool of the poor. You didn't have to be rich to have these skills. You just had to be disciplined and be willing to work, and you could have it.

    "That was one of the main reasons that the martial arts resonated with African-American males who, people conveniently forget, had all of their warrior traditions literally beaten out of them on slave plantations and in sharecropper/Jim Crow America. So these films were supremely inspirational to masses of black males who felt culturally robbed of their warrior spirit, and inspirational on a philosophical perspective, because of the responsibility that having the skills demanded."

    On a very direct and literal level, kung fu films also gave young black and brown kids heroes who were not white ("it's hard to understand looking back on it how revolutionary that was," Schloss says). But there was also a new model of learning—crucial for children who, like kids everywhere and at all times, mostly hated school. People in kung fu movies learned from a master, practiced their skills obsessively, and developed new styles, all practices that made their way into hip-hop culture.

    "What martial arts really did for hip-hop was to provide a model for an apprenticeship system that showed how you could respect a teacher or a mentor without diminishing your own self-respect," says Schloss. "It was a model where you could be like, 'I'm going to learn to be humble and disciplined, and let this guy tell me what to do, but that doesn't mean that I'm letting him disrespect me.' That's a big part of what allowed the art form to develop, because when people put themselves in that situation, they were able to learn a lot of important things and push the art form forward by being open to that instruction."

    Banjoko agrees. "It gave all of these renegade artists a blueprint for mastery, because they were innovating and trying to master something that was completely new," he says. "And so when you're looking at films like 36 Chambers and you're seeing all the times they have to practice one kick, all the times that they have to practice one punch—these guys are practicing that scratch, they're practicing the headspin, the freeze, with that same ferocity."
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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    Continued from previous post



    But at root, the reason martial arts is so deeply embedded in hip-hop is because it was deeply embedded in the lives of the kids who created hip-hop. Schloss sums it up:

    "Hip-hop was a combination of everything working-class teenage kids of color in New York City were into in the ’70s. So martial arts was just naturally a part of that."
    Had to chop this up to squeeze all the vids in (only one vid per post).

    Nice to see my friend Adisa quoted here.
    Gene Ching
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    If nothing else, KFK has brought attention to something we've all known for years...

    We've been talking about Hip Hop & Kung Fu here since 1999...Sept 99 to be exact. That was my first cover story for Kung Fu Tai Chi.



    The original Billboard article has links to all the tracks on spotify, but I couldn't quite cut&paste them here, so you'll have to follow the link if you don't know these.

    Before Kung Fu Kenny, 8 Most Kick-Ass Kung Fu-Inspired Hip-Hop Songs
    4/22/2017 by Rob LeDonne


    Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Coachella
    Kendrick Lamar performs during day 3 of the Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club on April 16, 2017 in Indio, Calif.

    With Wu-Tang Clan, Baauer, "The Karate Rap" and more.

    When Kendrick Lamar unleashed his fourth studio album ****. last week, the star took his show-stopping performance at Coachella as an opportunity to create a short film titled The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny around a classic hip-hop trope: kung fu.

    With actor Don Cheadle (whose Rush Hour 2 character Kenny inspired the Compton rapper's nickname Kung Fu Kenny) in the "DNA." video, Lamar is the latest artist in a long line of rap superstars to build a creative aesthetic around martial arts, with numerous names throughout the past 30 years finding inspiration in the ancient combative art.

    Fists up: Here are some of the most notable kung fu-inspired tracks in hip-hop history.

    Kendrick Lamar Wraps Coachella on '****.' High Note As Alter Ego Kung Fu Kenny In Short Film
    GZA, "Liquid Swords"

    “When I was little, my father was famous/ He was the greatest samurai in the empire," starts the title track of GZA’s 1995 epic Liquid Swords album, featuring the ultimate team-up between fierce kung fu awesomeness and a hip-hop great. For Wu-Tang member GZA’s second solo effort, the rapper expertly wove martial arts themes throughout the entire project, whether it was the album’s badass artwork depicting an epic fight to incorporating dialog from the 1980 cult classic film Shogun Assassin. It’s a prime example of two art forms melding into one beautiful soundtrack worthy for even the most skilled warrior.

    GZA Feat. Method Man, "Shadowboxin’"

    Allow them to demonstrate the skill of the Shaolin! GZA’s Liquid Swords was so epic it merits more than one notch on any respectable kung fu hip-hop playlist. Featuring Method Man, “Shadowboxin’” features dialog from the kung fu flick Shaolin vs. Lama and samples Memphis soul singer Ann Peebles' “Trouble, Heartaches and Sadness.” Coupled with GZA and Method Man’s unflinching lyrics (“Allow me to demonstrate/ That’s right, you corny a--/ The skill of Shaolin, rap motherf---ers”), the track is another Liquid Swords standout.

    Wu-Tang Clan, "Shame on a N---a"

    A year before GZA went solo with Liquid Swords, his crew the Wu-Tang Clan firmly based their creative themes around kung fu with their 1993 smash album, Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers). Named after the 1978 film The 36th Chamber of the Shaolin, the album kicks off with instant classic “Shame on a N---a” and the sounds of an epic fight, only getting more rough and tumble from there. One of the most acclaimed and influential albums in music history (it's credited for bringing the rap scene back to New York and went platinum within a year), Enter the Wu-Tang served as a harbinger for the numerous hip-hop and kung fu collabs to come.

    RZA, "Chi Kung"

    Another Wu-Tang member obsessed with kung fu, RZA’s “Chi Kung” is named after a practice otherwise known as “Qigong” which is made up of movements that are repeated multiple times. RZA’s track, however, is a bit more menacing with the the rapper’s on-the-nose rhymes when it comes to specific fighting techniques. “We use tai chi to deflect off our enemy,” he spits on the 2003 track. “Five poisons, from the Clan there’s no remedy.” The song comes courtesy of the rapper’s third album, the humbly titled Birth of a Prince.

    Baauer Feat. Pusha T & Future, "Kung Fu"

    Bringing a hip-hop-meets-kung fu playlist into this century is this pulsating track that combines the talent of “Harlem Shake” mastermind Baauer with rhymes courtesy of Pusha T and Future, respectively. The second single from Baauer's debut 2016 album Aa, “Kung Fu” showcases Future's boasting hook, “Hey and 'bout that boy they 'bout to die today/ Over that girl they 'bout to die today” and touches on themes of drug dealing and fierce fighting with Pusha T menacingly noting, “Counter-clockwise my wrists go."

    Afu-Ra, "Mortal Kombat"

    A deep cut courtesy of New York City rapper Afu-Ra, “Mortal Kombat” hails from his 2000 album Body of the Life Force, an ode to kung fu fighting that also features Wu-Tang members GZA and Masta Killa. On “Mortal Kombat,” Afu-Ra goes into detail on how he’d take down an enemy: “To be specific, I'm comin' through with jiu-jitsu/ Bone crushin' bone breakin' as I get into.”

    Ghostface Killah, "Mighty Healthy"

    Back to the Wu-Tang! Another 2000-era kung fu inspired track, Ghostface Killah’s unrelenting “Mighty Healthy” from his album Supreme Clientele opens with a sample from the battle-heavy Shaw Brothers classic Shaolin Rescuers. The entire Supreme album is angry and raw, perhaps a result of the fact that Ghostface served a six-month prison sentence on a weapons charge in the midst of production.

    “The Karate Rap”



    So this might not be one of the best kung fu-inspired rap tracks ever -- in fact, it may be the worst -- but it’s entertaining all the same. A song and video that's too '80s for its own good, "The Karate Rap" was released in 1986 and is all sorts of corny, teaching ka-ra-tay using stale rhymes and a generic beat. Perhaps that’s why when the whole bizarre opus resurfaced a few years ago, it proceeded to go viral. And if you’re wondering whether they stooped so low as to rhyme the word "karate" with the phrase "train your body"? Well... they did.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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    merch

    I don't usually plug other people's merch, but maybe Kendrick will advertise...


    Kung Fu Kenny L/S T-Shirt (Gold)
    $40.00
    SIZE S M L XL XXL
    PRE-SALE: ORDER WILL SHIP OUT BY MAY 11TH

    Long sleeve t-shirt in Gold. Screen-print "****." at chest, special "****." graphic at back and Kendrick Lamar at sleeve. Tonal stitching. 100% Cotton



    Kung Fu Kenny Hoodie (Black)
    $60.00
    SIZE S M L XL XXL
    PRE-SALE: ORDER WILL SHIP OUT BY MAY 11TH

    Long sleeve sweatshirt in black. Kangaroo pocket at front. Screen-print "****." at chest, special "Kung Fu Kenny" graphic at back and Kendrick Lamar at sleeve. Tonal stitching. 80% Cotton, 20% Polyester.


    Kung Fu Kenny L/S T-Shirt (Black)
    $40.00
    SIZE S M L XL XXL
    PRE-SALE: ORDER WILL SHIP OUT BY MAY 11TH

    Long sleeve t-shirt in black. Screen-print "****." at left-chest, special "Kung Fu Kenny" graphic at back and Kendrick Lamar at sleeve. Tonal stitching. 100% Cotton
    Gene Ching
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    Kendrick Lamar’s Los Angeles Staples Center stop on Aug. 6

    Concert Review: For Kendrick Lamar, Less Is More at Staples Center
    Justin Kroll
    Film Reporter
    @krolljvar


    Kendrick Lamar Coachella QUINN TUCKER/COACHELLA 2017

    AUGUST 7, 2017 | 07:14PM PT

    Plenty of emotions were on display at Kendrick Lamar’s Los Angeles Staples Center stop on Aug. 6, but the most evident one was ease. The Compton-native embodied a stage confidence that only few MCs possess. Opening a three-night run at the downtown arena, there was a palpable sense that Lamar was at home.

    Not afraid of holding a stage on his own, Lamar jumped from new song to old seamlessly. Kicking off the show with his hit single “DNA” while wearing a bright yellow jump-suit that paid homage to his hometown Los Angles Lakers, the rapper barely skipped a beat as he pumped up the crowd.

    Perhaps taking a cue from Wu-Tang Clan, a Kung-Fu theme was the throughline for the night and included the film “The **** Legend of Kung Fu,” during which Lamar is shown as his alter-ego “Kung-Fu Kenny,” a common reference on the rapper’s tracks, nodding to the Don Cheadle character in “Rush Hour 2.” The film features Lamar as a rookie trained by a shifu and finishing with the rapper as a scholar capable of channeling the energy of a master, known as the “glow.”

    In a way, the audience could be seen as new students with Lamar as the teacher, albeit delivering the technical skills that one is born with and can’t necessarily learn. In fact, martial artists were the only other humans to join the rapper on stage, though the crowd barely noticed as Lamar’s very presence was that captivating. The video would occasionally bleed in to Lamar’s performance including one impressive feat where Lamar appears to be hovering over the ground as he spits rhymes to his new song “Pride,” from the album “****.”

    Lamar takes a minimalist approach to his production, with flashing lights and the occasional shooting pyro the only real effect to join him on stage. Although, what kind of bells and whistles could feasibly accompany a beast of a song like “Humble,” anyway?

    Even the setlist had a less-is-more feel to it, with Kendrick steering clear of any tracks from fan-favorite album “Section. 80,” and sticking mainly to new material. Lamar did hit on old favorites like “Alright” and “King Kunta” for the loyalists in attendance, and each time the crowd erupted in applause.

    In a way, Lamar has earned the right to stay simple as the MC has always preferred a more anti-flamboyant vibe to that of his counterparts. Ironically, “****” is his most accessible album and you’d think he would want to hip new converts to the hits that helped him get there — and return home.
    This show comes to the SAP in San Jose on Saturday, but unfortunately that's the one major venue in the Bay Area where I do not work. Besides, we have Outside Lands this weekend.
    Gene Ching
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    Kendrick Lamar Opened the VMAs with a Fire Performance of 'DNA' and 'Humble'

    Gene Ching
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    K.Dot vs. Kung-Fu Kenny

    Kendrick Breaks Down the Difference Between “K.Dot” and “Kung-Fu Kenny”
    By DJ Z | Posted November 7, 2017

    "I didn't have the actual technique of songwriting then."


    Photo Credit: Justin Agoncillo

    In 2009, following the release of his Tha Carter III-inspired mixtape, C4, Kendrick Lamar decided to drop his then stage name K.Dot in favor of his real, government name. Less than 12 months later, the Compton native released a self-titled EP and Kendrick Lamar, the rapper, was officially born.

    This past weekend, during an interview with Jinx at ComplexCon alongside retired NBA superstar Kobe Bryant, Lamar discussed the evolution of his greatness and what separates K.Dot from Kendrick Lamar and, subsequently, his most recent alias, Kung-Fu Kenny.

    "K. Dot, this was me prepping myself, as far as the lyrical ability, and being able to go in the studio and say, 'You know what, I want to be the best wordsmith, anyone who gets on this track, I have to annihilate them however that is—whether that's through rhyme schemes, whether it's through metaphors, punchlines [or] wordplay,'" Lamar told Jinx. "I didn't have the actual technique of songwriting then. This is the transition where [I become] Kendrick Lamar and Kung-Fu Kenny. I look at Kung-Fu Kenny as a master of the craft now. Now I have the ability to make songs, and still have the wordsmith technique, and intertwine it and have a composed mentality on how to approach music. Now you're not just connecting with people in the studio and your homies, you're connecting with people around the world, universally."



    When it comes to Kendrick's desire to be the very best and to, as he said, "annihilate" the competition, not much has changed over the past eight years. What is noticeable, however, between the Kendrick of old (K.Dot) and the Kendrick of now (Kendrick) is the 30-year-old's ability to, as he pointed out, write songs (and full-length albums) with superior craftsmanship.

    Simply put: the days of Kendrick just trying to prove he can rap better than others are long gone.

    Part of becoming a great writer is practice—I should know, I've been writing every day for the past decade—but real life experience is just as important. At the time of his name change, Kendrick was only 22 years of age. He was an adult, sure, but he still had plenty of growing left to do—both as an artist and as a man. And it's that natural growth over the past nine years, more than a stage name change or alias swap, that has resulted in a handful of classic albums and the title of the greatest rapper alive.
    innerestin point. maybe i should adopt a stage name...for writing's sake.
    Gene Ching
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    Don'

    Kung Fu Kenny meets shoes.
    Gene Ching
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    Don't Trip is a great thing to put on a shoe

    SNEAKERS
    From the ground up



    Here’s Your First Look at Kendrick Lamar’s “Kung-Fu Kenny” Nike Cortez
    By Graeme Campbell in Sneakers7 hours ago3864 Shares1 Comment

    Having left Reebok for Nike back in August, we can now peep a first look at Kendrick Lamar’s latest signature Cortez.

    The sneaker pays tribute to Kendrick’s Kung-Fu Kenny alter ego, sporting red medial and lateral panels and a white throat and toe box. The classic Cortez Swoosh is also incorporated in white, while black laces, Chinese text embroidery – directly translating to English as “Supposed to Die,” but has a double entendre that means “****” — and a “DON’T TRIP” lace holder complete the eye-catching look.

    View image on Twitter



    Kendrick Lamar

    @kendricklamar
    DON'T TRIP. CORTEZ KENNY

    7:15 PM - Dec 18, 2017
    838 838 Replies 31,291 31,291 Retweets 116,105 116,105 likes
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    Kendrick first announced the new partnership with a Twitter post bearing the caption, “Cortez. Since day one. #teamnike #TDE.” Despite being tied to Reebok, the rapper has never hidden affections for Bill Bowerman’s first commercial shoe, famously co-signing “White T’s and Nike Cortez” on 2013’s “Control” track with Big Sean. Recently, K-Dot wore the shoe throughout the ****. tour, and back in October, an all red version surfaced complete with the “TDE” acronym (Top Dawg Entertainment — the label he’s signed to).

    View image on Twitter

    Kendrick Lamar

    @kendricklamar
    Cortez. Since day one. #teamnike #TDE @nike @nikelosangeles

    12:02 PM - Aug 26, 2017
    452 452 Replies 5,943 5,943 Retweets 21,284 21,284 likes
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    It remains to be seen whether the kick will see a public rollout, but having remixed various classic models during his time at Reebok — namely the Ventilator, Classic Leather and Club C — we expect Kendrick will be busy with the Beaverton design team throughout 2017.

    Stay posted for further information.

    Kendrick Lamar’s hometown, Compton, is inextricably tied to the Cortez. Here’s what real ‘heads from there think about it.

    Kung Fu Kenny meets shoes.
    Gene Ching
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    'The show played out like a kung fu film'

    ****. Kung Fu Kenny!
    Fans were treated to a musical and visual masterpiece as Kendrick brought the ****. experience to London.
    By Andy Djaba
    Friday, 23rd February 2018



    I feel like I’ve spent the last five months as Felix Music Editor almost exclusively writing about Kendrick Lamar. Nonetheless, please indulge me one more time… I’ll try to keep it brief. Kendrick Lamar completed the UK leg of his ****. world tour last week, performing six nights and shutting down arenas in Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, and London.

    The show played out like a kung fu film, with a recurring theme of martial arts running throughout and the concert beginning with a short film depicting “the **** legend of Kung Fu Kenny”. The night got off to a frantic start as Kendrick kicked off his set with a literal BANG before launching into the explosive ‘DNA.’, complete with a ninja sharing the stage with him. This breathless start to the show set the pace for the rest of the evening as Kendrick proceeded to perform a medley of up-tempo fan favourites, including ‘ELEMENT.’ and ‘King Kunta’. It wasn’t until after performing his feature verse on ScHoolboy Q’s ‘Collard Greens’ that Kendrick gave the crowd a moment to catch its breath, before taking us back with ‘Swimming Pools (Drank)’ and ‘Backseat Freestyle’ from 2012’s good kid, m.A.A.d city. The intro to ‘FEEL.’ played out whilst an accompanying dance performance took place on stage as King Kendrick made his way to perform ‘LUST.’ and ‘Money Trees’ in an elevated cage in the centre of the regular standing section, amongst his adoring subjects. Kendrick standing within spitting distance of me was arguably the highlight of my evening and that moment was only matched by the a cappella rendition of ‘HUMBLE.’ as the concert drew to a close. There was something magical about hearing the 20,000-strong crowd echo back every line from the track and even Kendrick seemed touched, pausing to witness the extent to which his music has impacted the culture and pervaded the mass consciousness of our generation.

    This was quite simply the best concert I’ve attended, worth every penny of the £80 ticket price. If his masterstroke in executive producing the Black Panther album weren’t enough proof that Kendrick is an artist at the peak of his powers, seeing him perform live proves his artistry seemingly knows no bounds. Not to sound cliché, but only one word can describe the extravaganza Kendrick put on for us: ****.
    His tour comes to Oaktown on May 8. Given the Black Panther connection there, it's going to be massive.

    Thread: The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny by Kendrick Lamar
    Thread: Black Panther
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    Kung Fu Kenny as a Black Panther villain


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    HIP-HOP
    KENDRICK LAMAR WANTS TO PLAY A MISUNDERSTOOD VILLAIN IN BLACK PANTHER 2
    'I’D PLAY A KILLMONGER FOR SURE'
    MADELINE ROTH
    02/23/2018

    With Black Panther establishing a groundbreaking hit franchise for the Marvel Cinematic Universe, fans are already looking ahead to the (practically inevitable) sequel. One such fan is Kendrick Lamar, the film’s sonic maestro, who curated its star-studded, chart-topping soundtrack.

    In a new interview with BBC Radio 1 — following his fiery BRITs performance — host Clara Amfo asked Kendrick about the possibility of landing a cameo role in the next Black Panther flick.

    “Come on, I got to now!” the rapper responded, adding that he’d love to portray a multi-layered antagonist like Michael B. Jordan’s Erik Killmonger. “I really enjoy Killmonger’s character, just off the simple fact that he was a villain but he came with some real [talk]. … He was a villain but he was loved and misunderstood. So if I could, I’d play a Killmonger for sure.”

    Kendrick also spoke about crafting the Black Panther soundtrack, saying, “Not even talking about the music - just the movie and the cast and the director - I think it's something that not only stands within its moment, but stands within time. We’re talking about timeless films and things that are going to curate after this film. When we got to the music, I just wanted to make sure that I could complement that and be a part of [it] in the best way I could.”

    From everything we’ve seen, Kendrick and Black Panther have been a truly excellent match, so here’s hoping he can take that relationship to the next level and land that coveted cameo.
    Heck, I'd like to play a villain in any MCU flick.


    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    Greetings wolfen,

    Did you actually see this movie?

    mickey
    Quote Originally Posted by wolfen View Post
    Greetings Mickey!

    Not an argument.

    Wolfen
    That's not argumentative. That's a perfectly reasonable question on a film review thread.

    Thread: The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny by Kendrick Lamar
    Thread: Black Panther
    Gene Ching
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  14. #14
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    origins


    Alexandre Moors / Good Company

    The Real Story Behind Kendrick Lamar’s Kung-Fu Kenny
    By Fabian Gorsler in Music 1 day ago

    Kendrick Lamar has been touring the world in support of his Grammy award winning album ****., and anyone who’s been paying any attention will have seen that the rapper has been performing in front of a rather strange backdrop of short clips. The clips, which depict Kendrick Lamar as his martial arts alter ego Kung Fu Kenny, culminate in him finding what he describes as “the glow.”

    When stitched together, the tour clips turn into a short film which has been dubbed The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny, which you can watch below. In it, Kendrick Lamar aka Kung Fu Kenny is a promising martial artist that is looking to master his skills. He ultimately does so by finding the glow – in a woman’s vagina no less.

    Although a lot has been written about it, not much has been officially communicated about the actual origins of the Kung Fu Kenny act. Some speculate that the name was inspired by Don Cheadle’s character of the same name in Rush Hour 2. This piece by The Fader goes into detail about how Kendrick Lamar admitted to as much.

    Lamar first invited his alter ego into the limelight during his “DNA.” music video featuring none other than – you guessed it – Don Cheadle. In the visuals Kung Fu Kenny is given free reign, rapping and simultaneously showing off his combat skills.

    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #15
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    Continued from previous post

    Since then, Kung Fu Kenny has grown in stature, serving as influence for a pair of Kendrick Lamar x Nike Cortez sneakers and ultimately taking over the ‘****.’ Tour with the above short movie.

    While there’s no reason to doubt that the name was taken from Rush Hour 2, there’s also more to Kung Fu Kenny’s journey than meets the eye.

    The plot of The **** Legend of Kung Fu Kenny and the journey itself are almost certainly based on a cult martial arts movie called The Last Dragon, the trailer for which you can watch below.



    In the movie, a character named Leroy Green aka Bruce Leroy is on a quest to become as great a martial artist as his idol Bruce Lee. Living in New York City, Leroy’s master tells him he has reached the final level of martial arts accomplishment known as “The Last Dragon.”

    Those who reach this level are said to be able to discover and harness the power of “the glow,” a mystical power that gives whoever controls it transcendent skill. Once Bruce Leroy has found the glow, he has reached his full potential as a martial artist.

    For Kung Fu Kenny, finding the glow means mastering the art of rap and hip-hop. When Lamar’s alter ego finally finds the glow – in a woman’s vagina no less – it signifies that the rapper has reached his full potential as an artist and is at the top of his game.

    Lamar’s short film ends with the words “Kung Fu Kenny Found the Motha****in’ Glow Hoe,” signifying that he believes he is one of the biggest hip hop acts around right now. He’s telling his audience he’s a master at his craft and that his artistry is second to none.

    Basically, Kung Fu Kenny is the Bruce Leroy of hip-hop and the ****. tour is his journey. The hunt for the elusive glow is a clear reflection of Kendrick Lamar’s career so far, during which he has strived to become the best in his chosen field. And so, in turn, each of the short, pre-recorded clips are simultaneously a glimpse into Kenny’s quest, as well as Kendrick’s because – really – they are one and the same.

    While the inspiration is now more or less clear, the motivation behind parodying The Last Dragon still paints a murky picture. The film was dubbed a critical disappointment upon its release in 1985, however, thanks to a passionate fanbase, became a financial success and, later, a cult classic.

    As a cult classic set in New York and featuring a predominantly black cast, it makes sense for this movie’s plot to be the inspiration for Kung Fu Kenny’s quest. Hip hop and martial arts have a long and storied history, with more than a few notable songs clearly inspired by Asian culture.

    Wu-Tang Clan is the first that jumps to mind. The group’s 1993 album, Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), was named after the 1978 film The 36th Chamber of the Shaolin. Naturally, when the rap group split up its members carried that influence over to their individual careers. RZA and GZA both released songs that either directly referenced fighting techniques in the title or spit bars like RZA’s “we use tai chi to deflect off our enemy” from his 2003 track “Chi Kung.”
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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