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Thread: Cultural Appropriation

  1. #16

    Circus Canada

    Quote Originally Posted by rett2 View Post
    What was the good again?
    Depends if you are on the good side. Government for the Government, of the Government, by the Government is a good thing to oppose toxic nationalism. As a post nationalist country with no core Identity, Canada needs to stop the cultural appropriation of such things as the British Legal System.
    ..
    Only those far right extremists like the former AG would oppose the building of a new reformation and purge of toxic cultural appropriation of fuddy-duddy laws in the former Canada. As the CBC reports , The leader Trudeau has sacrificed himself as a feminist and supporter of native rights to build the International Not-Canada economy in opposing the machinations of the former "what-was-her-name-and-who-cares?".

    Makes sense to me.

    Update on the Gong Show in India

    "顺其自然"

  2. #17

    Bill Maher - 'Cultural Appropriation is just something that was made up'

    No One is Hurt by the Made Up "Cultural Appropriation"

    "顺其自然"

  3. #18
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    Here's one

    Good ol' Kardashians...

    Again, I don't know where to post this


    Kim Kardashian just trademarked ‘Kimono.’ Let the backlash begin

    By CHRISTIE D'ZURILLA
    JUN 25, 2019 | 12:15 PM


    Kim Kardashian West at the 2018 MTV Movie & TV Awards in Santa Monica. (Jordan Strauss / Associated Press)

    Kim Kardashian West launched a shapewear line Tuesday with the unfortunate name Kimono Solutionwear. Because Kim, get it?

    And so began another round of Kim K. being accused of cultural appropriation. Like when she wore Fulani braids, or an Indian headpiece or looked like she was in blackface.

    It appears nobody in Kardashian’s orbit was too worried that the Japanese got to “kimono” first, a few centuries back, when they named those loose-sleeved robes that are traditionally worn as formal outerwear.

    “Finally I can share with you guys this project that I have been developing for the last year. I’ve been passionate about this for 15 years. Kimono is my take on shapewear and solutions for women that actually work,” Kardashian wrote Tuesday on Instagram.

    “I would always cut up my shapewear to make my own styles, and there have also been so many times I couldn’t find a shapeware [sic] color that blended with my skin tone so we needed a solution for all of this.”

    While the coming-soon line appears to be body-inclusive, running in sizes from XXS to 4XL and in nine skin-toned shades, the brand’s name upset some people on social media, who called it “problematic at best” and tagged Kardashian a “culture vulture,” among other names.

    “Rih would never. Bey would never. Anyone with a working brain would never,” wrote Twitter user stylevoguette, referencing Rihanna and Beyoncé.

    A user going by Leisha_17 had a different complaint, however, tweeting: “Probably is a good product but the name.... I hear it as ‘Kim, oh NO!’”

    Kardashian was also dragged for not using any plus-size models in her images. And for not having zippers. All told, it looks like a lot of ways to lose.

    Incidentally, the word Kimono has previously been trademarked twice by others, for products including software and “sheaths for pens.”

    However, “Kimono,” “Kimono Body,” “Kimono Intimates” and “Kimono World” do appear to be among the other Kardashian-empire trademarks filed and awaiting review. For the most part, the applications target clothing (shapewear, lingerie, T-shirts) and products made of leather or imitation leather (handbags, wallets, dog harnesses, whips).

    Yes, whips. Maybe they’re supposed to go with future lingerie?


    Christie D'Zurilla

    Christie D’Zurilla covers breaking entertainment and celebrity news. A graduate of USC, she joined the Los Angeles Times in 2003 as a copy editor and has more than 25 years of journalism experience in Southern California. As befits her beat, she has a high tolerance for inappropriate behavior.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  4. #19
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    about that backlash... #KimOhNo

    Go get her, Tamlyn. Hope you get a role in Cobra Kai...

    JUNE 26, 2019 2:14PM PT
    Kim Kardashian West’s ‘Kimono’ Shapewear Sparks Backlash
    By AUDREY CLEO YAP


    CREDIT: CLINT SPAULDING/SHUTTERSTOCK

    UPDATED: West announced on Tuesday that she was launching a line of form-fitting shapewear in nine different skin tones and a range of sizes. But the name of the reality star’s latest business venture — “Kimono” — is already wrapped up in controversy. Kimonos are Japanese robes traditionally worn at formal affairs, prompting some to accuse the businesswoman of cultural appropriation. Using the hashtag “#KimOhNo” on social media, critics called the line disrespectful; users like Japanese American actor Tamlyn Tomita are posting pictures of actual kimonos.


    View image on Twitter

    Tamlyn Tomita

    @thetamlyntomita
    One is KIMONO. One is Kim shamelessly selling a line of shapewear. Which y’all don’t need. #kimono

    2,598
    3:13 PM - Jun 25, 2019
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    Accompanying a side-by-side photo of Tomita in the traditional robe and of West in her branded shapewear, Tomita wrote, “One is KIMONO. One is Kim shamelessly selling a line of shapewear. Which y’all don’t need.”

    West addressed the controversy in a statement to The New York Times Thursday, saying that she has no plans “to design or release any garments that would in any way resemble or dishonor the traditional garment,” but also did not plan to change the brand’s name.

    Kimonos are not traditionally worn as undergarments.

    In a series of tweets posted on Wednesday, West used the hashtag #KimonoBody to promote the line. She also revealed that musician husband Kanye West drew the brand’s logo.

    This is not the first time the 38-year-old has faced allegations of cultural appropriation: In 2018, West drew backlash after crediting her braided hair to Bo Derek from Derek’s 1979 film “10.” The style, known as Fulani braids, has its origins in West Africa and the Fula ethnic group.

    Since announcing the line, West — who said she has worked on the line for the past year — has posted a series of pictures of its offerings, including bodysuits, briefs and bras.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #20
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    #KimOhNo FTW!

    Kim Kardashian West finally caves on Kimono brand after cultural appropriation accusations
    By CHRISTIE D'ZURILLA
    JUL 01, 2019 | 8:15 AM


    “When I announced the name of my shapewear line, I did so with the best intentions in mind," Kim Kardashian West said Monday in a notice that she would change the name. (Laura Thompson / TNS)

    Bowing to pressure, Kim Kardashian West will change the name of her Kimono Solutionwear line, presumably to something less controversial, the reality star-turned-entrepreneur announced Monday morning.

    “When I announced the name of my shapewear line, I did so with the best intentions in mind,” Kardashian West said on social media. “My brands and products are built with inclusivity and diversity at their core and after careful thought and consideration, I will be launching my Solutionwear brand under a new name.”

    The announcement pointedly left out the hot-button word that set off the controversy last week: Kimono, which KKW had applied to trademark in various permutations. She did praise “the direct line of communication with my fans and the public,” which apparently has been on fire since she launched the line Tuesday.

    Kardashian West was quickly accused of cultural appropriation of the name. In a Thursday statement to the New York Times, in which she defended her understanding and “deep respect” for the meaning of kimono in Japanese culture, she said she had no plans to change the name.

    But on Monday she was singing a different tune.


    kimkardashian
    Verified


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    Being an entrepreneur and my own boss has been one of the most rewarding challenges I’ve been blessed with in my life. What’s made it possible for me after all of these years has been the direct line of communication with my fans and the public. I am always listening, learning and growing - I so appreciate the passion and varied perspectives that people bring to me. When I announced the name of my shapewear line, I did so with the best intentions in mind. My brands and products are built with inclusivity and diversity at their core and after careful thought and consideration, I will be launching my Solutionwear brand under a new name. I will be in touch soon. Thank you for your understanding and support always.
    7h
    “I am always listening, learning and growing — I so appreciate the passion and varied perspectives that people bring to me,” she wrote on Instagram.

    It’s unclear whether one of the voices she listened to was that of the mayor of Kyoto, Japan, who on Friday sent a letter, obtained by The Times, that in part described kimono as “a fruit of craftsmanship … [that] truly symbolizes sense of beauty, spirits and values of Japanese.”

    Mayor Daisaku Kadokawa also specifically asked Kardashian West to reconsider using the word kimono in her trademark.

    “We are currently undertaking initiatives nationally to make ‘Kimono Culture,’ symbol of our culture and spirits, registered to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list. We think that the names for ‘Kimono’ are the asset shared with all humanity who love Kimono and its culture therefore they should not be monopolized,” Kadokawa wrote before inviting Kardashian West to visit the city and deepen her understanding.

    On Monday, commenters were already suggesting names like sKim Wear or KimBody in response to her Instagram notice.


    Christie D'Zurilla

    Christie D’Zurilla covers breaking entertainment and celebrity news. A graduate of USC, she joined the Los Angeles Times in 2003 as a copy editor and has more than 25 years of journalism experience in Southern California. As befits her beat, she has a high tolerance for inappropriate behavior.
    Well that's a teaching momemt and a happy ending.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #21
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    An epilogue?

    Even though this is done, I'm going to split Kim Kardashian Kimonos #KimOhNo into its own indie thread off the Cultural Appropriation thread. I'm not sure why. Maybe because I like the alliteration of title.



    Kyoto mayor asks Kim Kardashian West to reconsider choice of 'kimono' for underwear brand
    KYODO JUL 1, 2019

    KYOTO - Kyoto’s kimono-loving mayor sent a letter to American pop culture icon Kim Kardashian West asking her to reconsider trademarking “kimono” as the name of her new underwear brand, the ancient capital said Monday.

    “Kimono is a traditional ethnic dress fostered in our rich nature and history with our predecessors’ tireless endeavors and studies, and it is a culture that has been cherished and passed down with care,” wrote Mayor Daisaku Kadokawa, who is renowned for always wearing kimono while carrying out official duties.

    The mayor said not only Japanese but also foreign tourists often stroll around Kyoto wearing kimono, adding that his city is trying to have kimono culture registered on UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list.

    “We think that the names for ‘kimono’ are the asset shared with all humanity who love kimono and its culture, therefore they should not be monopolized,” Kadokawa wrote.

    A spokeswoman for the municipal government’s traditional industries section said the message has been sent to Kardashian West in English by post and in an email, as well as being uploaded onto the mayor’s official Facebook page. However, the city has yet to receive a reply from the American celebrity.

    Kardashian West released details about her upcoming Kimono Solutionwear collection on social media last week. “Kimono is my take on shapewear and solutions for women that actually work,” she wrote.

    However, her announcement was slammed on social media, with people creating a pun hashtag “#KimOhNo” to pour scorn on the name.

    Kadokawa, who is serving his third term as mayor of Kyoto, began wearing kimono soon after he was elected in 2008. He does so in support of the traditional industry.

    The mayor ended his letter by inviting Kardashian West to visit Kyoto, asking her to “experience the essence of Kimono Culture and understand our thoughts and our strong wish.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  7. #22
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    The Mahjong Line

    I didn't cut&paste all of the IG posts.
    Mahjong Set for the ‘Stylish Masses’ Accused of Cultural Appropriation
    BY ISA PERALTA
    JANUARY 5, 2021
    4 MINUTE READ



    Editor’s Note: This article has been updated with a statement posted by the Mahjong Line on the company’s Instagram and Facebook on Tuesday. O&H Brand Design, which helped design the tiles, also released a separate statement saying they have since cut ties with The Mahjong Line.

    The Mahjong Line, a company created by three women from Dallas, Texas, has stirred online controversy for its products that give Mahjong “a modern makeover as playable works of art.”

    Background of the company: According to Paper City, Kate LaGere first learned how to play Mahjong in Dallas in 2018. LeGere wanted to own a unique set of tiles but could not find anything beyond those with traditional designs. She eventually teamed up with friends and fellow Mahjong players Annie O’Grady and Bianca Watson to create The Mahjong Line.

    According to the company’s About Us page, LaGere decided Mahjong “needed a respectful refresh.” LeGere, O’Grady and Watson “hatched a plan to bring Mahjong to the stylish masses.”

    The company’s website currently offers five different collections ranging from $325 to $425.
    The Mahjong Line also offers accessories, such as a playing mat priced at $50.



    Facing backlash: Several Facebook users expressed outrage over the products by commenting on The Mahjong Line’s Facebook posts. Users accused the company of not having any employees of Asian descent and profiting off the whitewashing of a game with Chinese origins.

    Several Twitter users also shared their opinions on The Mahjong Line:




    Response to outrage: The Mahjong Line has yet to release a statement addressing the allegations of cultural appropriation, and the company has disabled comments on their Instagram posts. Their Facebook page is still currently active.

    NextShark has reached out to The Mahjong Line for comment via email, their Facebook page, and their Instagram account. Below is a statement posted to the company’s social media accounts on Tuesday evening:

    “We launched this company in November of 2020 with pure intentions and a shared love for the game of American Mahjong, which carries a rich history here in the United States. Our mission is to combine our passion for art and color alongside the fun of the game while seeking to appeal to novices and experienced players alike. American Mahjong tiles have evolved for many decades and we’d like to be part of this evolution in the most respectful and authentic way possible.

    While our intent is to inspire and engage with a new generation of American mahjong players, we recognize our failure to pay proper homage to the game’s Chinese heritage. Using words like ‘refresh’ were hurtful to many and we are deeply sorry.

    It’s imperative our followers know we never set out to ignore or misrepresent the origins of this game and know there are more conversations to be had and steps to take as we learn and grow. We are always open to constructive criticism and are continuing to conduct conversations with those who can provide further insight to the game’s traditions and roots in both Chinese and American cultures.”

    O&H Brand Design, a full-service branding, advertising and graphic design agency based in Dallas, also released a recent statement for their part in creating The Mahjong Line tiles. They have since cut ties with The Mahjong Line.

    “We are deeply and sincerely sorry for the role we played in the creation of The Mahjong Line tiles and brand. There was a clear lack of awareness, cultural appreciation and respect on our part during our design process. We own that and apologize for it.

    We must do better, and we are taking steps to educate ourselves so that we do not make these types of mistakes again. We have also begun the process of researching ways to learn from the Asian-American community in our city and region so that we can better understand, respect and honor it moving forward.

    We have also terminated our relationship with The Mahjong Line.

    While our apology can not change the work we did, we humbly ask for the opportunity to improve both as a company and as individuals moving forward.

    – The O&H Team”

    Featured Image via themahjongline.com
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    Gene Ching
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  8. #23
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    Karen, Queen of Congee

    ‘Karen, Queen of Congee’ draws backlash over brand ‘improving’ ancient Asian dish for the Western palate

    Carl Samson
    Tue, July 20, 2021, 10:58 AM·4 min read


    A breakfast brand that “improves” congee for the Western palate has stirred controversy over the weekend after Twitter users accused it of cultural appropriation.

    Company background: Founded in 2017 in Eugene, Ore., Breakfast Cure sells packets of various “congee” flavors that emphasize “organic, gluten-free, whole grains and a wide variety of ingredients.” It calls each of its servings a “bowl of zen.”

    Breakfast Cure was founded by Karen Taylor, a licensed acupuncturist who started eating congee some 25 years ago and became interested in the process of slow cooking grains for better digestion. Since then, she says she has tried different combinations to find “some really tasty, healthy ones, some based on ancient tradition and some [her] own creations.”

    There are currently 13 flavors of Breakfast Cure’s prepackaged “congee.” These include “Apple Cinnamon,” “Coconut Blueberry Bliss,” “Golden Spice,” “Karen’s Kitchari,” “Mango and Sticky Rice,” “Masala Chai Spice,” “Mega-Omega,” “Om Berry,” “Pear-Fection,” “Pineapple Paradise,” “Romano Bean Dream,” “Tangled Up in Blueberry” and “Three Treasures.”

    The brand says its “simple congee method” spreads the wisdom that warm, cooked foods “heal, soothe and energize.” Listed benefits include hydration, gentle cleansing and an overall metabolism and energy boost.

    What critics are saying: The company started receiving backlash over the weekend after one Twitter user accused it of cultural appropriation. Other users have since joined to criticize its methods and statements.

    In a thread, Twitter user Casey Ho (@CaseyHo) shared screenshots of Breakfast Cure’s Instagram posts, including a photo of its all-white team. She also shared what appears to be an earlier version of Taylor’s blog post titled “How I discovered the miracle of congee and improved it.”

    In her original post, Taylor wrote that she has spent a lot of time “modernizing” congee “for the Western pallet [sic]” so that “you” can eat it and find it “delicious,” not “foreign.” The post appears to have been edited as of this writing, but a quick Google search still shows the original title.

    Chinese American writer Frankie Huang (@ourobororoboruo) is one of Breakfast Cure's critics, writing: "Like a broken record, I must say that it’s unbelievably annoying to see white people 'interpret' cultures of millions and billions of living people like they’re archeologists. Being treated like we are dead makes me want to lie down."

    Jenn Fang of Reappropriate (@reappropriate) also took a jab at Breakfast Cure: "Congee isn’t just 'boiled rice,' it also contains some specific and traditional flavor profiles one shouldn’t just totally ignore; and certainly not treat as bizarre or unappetizing... It’s definitely offensive for anyone trying to 'reinterpret' congee to do so by framing the traditional version as gross and icky, and that their 'reinterpretations' will save it in some way by making it better or easier for white folks."

    Taylor, who was once referred to as "Our Founder and Queen of Congee” on the company website's Meet the Team page, is now solely called "Our Founder." The "Queen of Congee" title prompted some users to poke fun at Taylor's first name, Karen, a pejorative alias that has come to represent problematic white women on the internet.

    Company responds: In a statement to NextShark, Breakfast Cure apologized for their problematic language and vowed to continue supporting the Asian American community. The company said they have donated to the Asian Mental Health Collective and are currently supporting Asian Americans Advancing Justice.

    Read Breakfast Cure's full statement below:

    "At Breakfast Cure, the heart of our mission is to create delicious whole food breakfasts to give you the fastest homemade meal possible. Our Oregon porridge is inspired by traditional rice congee, an incredible, healing dish with references dating back to 1,000 B.C.

    "Recently, we fell short of supporting and honoring the Asian American community and for that, we are deeply sorry. We take full responsibility for any language on our website or in our marketing and have taken immediate steps to remedy that and educate ourselves, revising our mission to not just creating delicious breakfast meals, but becoming a better ally for the AAPI community.

    "Previously, in March we donated 15% of sales to the Asian Mental Health Collective, posting our support and denouncing Asian hate. We will continue to donate 1% of all sales or 10% of profit, whichever is larger to non-profit and activist organizations. Currently, all purchases support Asian Americans Advancing Justice."


    Featured Image via Made With Lau

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    Gene Ching
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  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Seems pretty silly considering that Chinese restaurants catering to western customers already often tailor the food to what they consider to be western taste.

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I sometimes watch Karens getting beaten by an Asian... really worth it.

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