Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 37

Thread: Wu Assassins

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    Binged the whole season 1 last weekend

    Carl Samson·August 2, 2019·18 min read
    ‘Wu Assassins’ Star Lewis Tan is Assassinating Asian Male Stereotypes



    Netflix continues to champion Asian representation with “Wu Assassins,” a new supernatural martial arts series that follows a warrior’s search for the powers of an ancient triad to restore balance in San Francisco’s Chinatown.

    The show, which drops next week, stars Indonesian actor Iko Uwais (“The Night Comes for Us”), along with Hong Kong American star Byron Mann (“Blood and Water”) and British American actor Lewis Tan (“Into the Badlands”).



    In an interview with NextShark, Tan, who plays Lu Xin Lee, revealed interesting details on his casting and character, whom he described as someone with “major identity issues.”

    “I had just finished 11 months filming ‘Into the Badlands’ when I landed in Los Angeles and my agents sent me the breakdown for Lu Xin Lee, the character I play. At this time I didn’t know who was involved, just that he was an Asian American gangster set in modern times.”


    Image via Instagram / @lewistanofficial

    “I was really interested to explore new dynamics after being on such a genre-specific show and doing specialized Hong Kong-style action,” Tan said. “The possibilities of this wild character and the violent gritty action style was alluring.”

    “I sent in a tape I filmed in my kitchen eating noodles and had a long conversation with our showrunner John Wirth. After hearing his vision and passion, I had to be a part of it.”


    Image via Instagram / @lewistanofficial

    Tan put in the hours to prepare for his exciting new character, which many would find relatable.

    “Like every role, there is always preparation involved. Getting to understand the character, why he does what he does, his motivations, fears, desires and loves, then discovering how I can physically and emotionally embody it. I try new things, fail, try again until it connects and then finds its flow.”


    Image via Instagram / @lewistanofficial

    “Lu Xin has major identity issues, deals with a lot of past trauma and covers it up with a flashy lifestyle, cocky attitude and making very risky choices,” Tan said. “This is a common theme in life.”

    “Why do we need the fancy car, the designer jewelry? We feel the need for validation from strangers. We want to be loved, understood, valued. The more we stop and ask ourselves why the more we can get to the raw naked truth. Everything revolves around love or fear. Whichever motivates your thoughts, you will manifest.”


    Image via Instagram / @lewistanofficial

    Tan, whose jaw-dropping physique has proven popular on TV, said that he is happy to break aged stereotypes about Asian men.

    “There is a stereotype created long ago that Asian men are not attractive or masculine. Even recently, Steve Harvey made those comments on his show, in this modern time.”

    “I am happy to help break those lies and open up a new and more accurate way of thinking. I train a lot, not for vanity purposes but because I love martial arts.

    “It is an integral part of my life, it helps balance my energy. I love being fluid and powerful, responsive and fast.”


    Image via Instagram / @lewistanofficial
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    Continued from previous post

    The 32-year-old star maintains a meticulous balance of a healthy diet and training — which includes a combination of various styles — to stay in shape.

    “I mix up my training with different styles: Muay Thai, boxing, weapons, kung fu, and sparring. I add in weight training, calisthenics, yoga, meditation, and full-body recovery.”

    The show, which drops next week, stars Indonesian stuntman Iko Uwais ("The Night Comes for Us"), along with Hong Kong American star Byron Mann ("Blood and Water") and British American actor Lewis Tan ("Into the Badlands").
    Image via Instagram / @lewistanofficial
    “I eat as clean as possible and as balanced as possible,” he said. “I try to know where my food and water is from, removing processed food and sugars from my diet almost completely, and again, I enjoy the way I feel so it isn’t much of a sacrifice.”

    “If I am on vacation or traveling and I see an amazing dessert or a fat-heavy food, I will eat it. It is important to be happy, let yourself live, but don’t overindulge. It is the same with all good things in life. Balance, but as far as being attractive goes, it is all in knowing yourself, embracing who you are and being kind — nothing more attractive than that.”


    Image via Instagram / @lewistanofficial

    Tan likened the cast of the show to a “big family,” whose members know how to have a good time.

    “Everyday was a riot. I mean that the entire cast got along like a big family. We would play tricks and pranks on each other, show up on set when we weren’t filming just to support each other, train together, eat together and celebrate together. This is a first, for this many Asian actors to be together in a modern original Netflix series.”

    He especially grew close to Uwais, who allegedly enjoys singing and dancing in their makeup trailer.

    “We knew and felt like it was bigger than us. We came together to do great work, not just for our series, but to open doors for generations to come. I have too many funny stories — remind me to post the video of Iko Uwais doing karaoke and dancing in the makeup trailer. I will be risking my life, so if something happens to me you know where to look.”


    Image via Instagram / @lewistanofficial

    Jokes aside, Tan pointed out that he wants to leave a legacy in the industry, especially at a time when Asian actors are finding more representation.

    “I am excited to be acting at times like this. I want to be remembered for good work and not just for working. I choose carefully and end up turning down a lot of offers. Legacy is my main intention.”

    However, he pointed out that his ethnicity neither defines him nor his work.

    “Film is a powerful medium, arguably the most globally influential art form if you look at past history. It has changed lives, laws, and cultures. I don’t take it lightly. Being Asian is something I was born with, but it doesn’t define me or my work. As an artist, we all want the work to come first — how I am identified should be of less importance. That is the goal here: show people we are much similar then it may seem; the power of unity and understanding.”


    Images via Instagram / @lewistanofficial

    Still, Tan acknowledges misrepresentation in film, which could affect viewers — particularly young ones — for life.

    “When you watch films, you see a reflection of what society is thinking or saying. You begin to believe those ideas and narratives to be universally true, even if they are not. That is why it is dangerous.

    “If a young Asian kid sees 100 films where the young Asian kid is a nerd, how do you think he is going to feel? He is going to feel like people perceive him as a nerd. He begins to believe those things, and eventually, that mindset will manifest into reality with him accepting it.

    “People at school watch the same films, so they have a similar perspective when they see this kid. It is a cycle.”

    Nonetheless, Tan is proud of the work he has accomplished so far.

    “When I see the response to my work, it makes me proud to represent a different perspective. When I meet fans or kids at Comic-Con or wherever, it makes me proud to have suffered so much loss, failure, and rejection. I see their faces and it is all worth it.”

    “Wu Assassins” streams August 8 on Netflix.

    Featured Images via Instagram / @lewistanofficial
    I met Lewis on Into the Badlands. We've kept up a correspondance and I interviewed him for Deadpool 2. I as thinking of reaching out to him on this again, but then JuJu Chan reached out to us.

    Quote Originally Posted by Djuan View Post
    stereotypes in effect , and nice bay area action goin on
    Hang with it, Djuan. Those stereotypes are blown sideways. It's actually one of the most pro-Asian shows I've seen in a while, almost gratuitiously so. And it's really set in SF Chinatown, unlike Always Be My Maybe.

    More to come...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    362
    indeed, I trust your word.
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    362
    the stereotypes arent really bad ones either, to be clear. just generalization. I actually like the depiction of the "other side of the bay" as well, kinda had some romeo must die vibes , and does more justice than other shows that tried it like SOA.

    and about Always Be My Maybe lol that one was ok also, irony is we got into the stereotypes in that movie here the other day.
    told my fam I think the point of that one was satirical on purpose in its steortypes, from the sub cultures of the bay and the sub characters which were supposed to be "grounded and well rounded" which is how we are out here, most of us ......and like the hippe/harlot girlfriend who stuck with Keanu for "world peace and carbon footprint akashic mixtapes" lol that was classic, terrible, funny and spot on of the Bay to LA, I remember festi hoppers like that back in the day smh man oh man.

    stereotypes (negative or positive) will be built within any film or show like that because were dealing with point of views. like to make a film based on one group of people or location, or tribe, we have to view it through the lens of how the directors and writers, and actors even, interpret the group or location, and hope its 'grounded and well rounded'.

    We all like films and shows with universal principles. and thats an entirely different discussion/ potential thread.

    I think thats why martial arts films always had home in my (our) heart tho, no matter from what 'side' or 'art' because the principles of a martial artist are MOST Universal. I could watch the corny ones even lol, or the over hyped ones if they were done right in principle. I liked "Best of the Best" for example, a favorite movie as child, yet I cant stand competition TKD (no offense to anyone who practices TKD, dont come for me lol), I still love that movie to this day. '
    And though I love Shaolin, some of the old films I cant stomach because they were all poor stereotypes and no principle or substance. While some Shaolin movies or scenes even, stand strong to this day, like Enter the Dragon, 36 Chambers, Shaolin vs Lama, Holy Robe of Shaolin, and Shaolin Temple /Martial Arts of Shaolin .....all before the 90's.

    (pardon my rant )

    Amituofo
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    Wu Assassins

    The FALL 2019 Table of Contents is available online.



    THREADS
    Fall 2019
    Wu Assassins
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    Lawrence Kao

    I knew of most of the cast prior to the show but Kao was new to me. I really liked his performance and he nails a quality of this show that I've been trying to convey in this interview. Not everyone has been sensitive to it - particularly not several of my non-Chinese friends - even some of my Chinese friends spent too much time focusing on the Kung Fu to see it either.

    Wu Assassins star Lawrence Kao explains why new Netflix drama is not just about martial arts
    "Things like this don't come to Asian Americans that often."
    BY JESS LEE
    18/08/2019


    DANIEL POWER/NETFLIX

    Wu Assassins is more than just a martial arts show.

    The excellent action and choreography are no doubt some of the highlights of the Netflix drama, which launched last week. With a majority Asian American cast, the show also tells stories and emotional arcs rarely seen in this way on TV.

    Lawrence Kao plays Tommy Wah, a longtime friend of lead character Kai Jin (Iko Uwais) and a heroin addict.


    VIVIEN KILLILEAGETTY IMAGES

    "Things like this don't come to Asian Americans that often," he said in an interview with Digital Spy. "Being able to be a part of a show like this that revolutionises how people think of Asian Americans is just – I'm speechless.

    "People like it a lot. They're very huge fans of the martial arts, and I feel like the people who make it through the season see that the show explores underlying themes throughout that talk about Chinese culture, as well as dive into familial relationships and themes about identity. I think people are enjoying those things besides all the action and martial arts."

    Tommy is a complicated character. An addict and a member of the Triad, he regularly disappoints his friends despite often having good intentions.

    "It was fun to juxtapose the idea of what people think Asian Americans are, so to even be able to play a heroin addict and to play the different levels of what this kind of character goes through, especially as an Asian American, makes it fascinating for me to explore," he said.


    DANIEL POWER/NETFLIX

    "In the beginning, I feel like people will look at Tommy and go, 'Man, this kid is so annoying. He keeps messing up'. And people keep thinking negatively about him because he just continues to disappoint.

    "But as the season goes on, you realise, 'Man, this guy, he's just human'. There are vulnerabilities to him and he's trying. And people who make it through the season realise that and can empathise with him.

    "I [hope] this character, especially as an Asian American, will help other people who aren't Asian American empathise and see a person like this in a different light."


    DANIEL POWER/NETFLIX

    Tommy, alongside Kai, is part of a close-knit friendship group which includes his sister Jenny (Li Jun Li) and Lu Xin (Lewis Tan).

    It's uncommon to see an Asian American friendship group on screen, and Kao explained that they bonded away from the cameras as well.

    "I've never been part of a cast with a friendship group that consists mostly of Asian Americans," he said. "It definitely resonated.

    "Even being off set, it was just interesting to hang out with each other, and to have to take off our shoes when we go into each other's homes, and to have hot pot with each other, and to just be able to culturally hang out with one another without questioning any of it.

    "I've never really had that opportunity or that kind of experience. So being able to be like that off-set helped us establish a stronger connection when the cameras were rolling."


    NETFLIX

    Netflix has made a number of high-profile cancellations lately, including Santa Clarita Diet, The OA, Tuca & Bertie, and Designated Survivor. Will we see a second season for Wu Assassins?

    "It's really hard to say," Kao said. "It's difficult because it's all about the numbers in the first couple of weeks.

    "We're all out here trying to promote the show and tell people to watch it – and especially to watch it all the way through, because that's how they count their numbers.

    "I really have no idea. The season does wrap up nicely, but I want to see more. I want to see what these characters go through, and I'm just as invested as other people are when they watch the show. I'm hopeful. Fingers crossed."

    All ten episodes of Wu Assassins season 1 are available to watch on Netflix right now.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    362
    all I have to say is I took your advice and stuck with the show, and you were right about it, great work. very well rounded and universal artwork.
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    362
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I knew of most of the cast prior to the show but Kao was new to me. I really liked his performance and he nails a quality of this show that I've been trying to convey in this interview. Not everyone has been sensitive to it - particularly not several of my non-Chinese friends - even some of my Chinese friends spent too much time focusing on the Kung Fu to see it either.
    I think I get what you are saying about him, and what he adds. I will share my perspective later, when I cant be blamed for spoilers lol
    & I'm EAGERLY waiting on season 2.

    Amituofo
    Last edited by Djuan; 08-19-2019 at 06:26 PM.
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    Season 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Djuan View Post
    I think I get what you are saying about him, and what he adds. I will share my perspective later, when I cant be blamed for spoilers lol
    & I'm EAGERLY waiting on season 2.
    I just didn't know Kao. The rest of the cast I knew. I've been following Iko since Merantau (10 years!). I'm a huge fan of his work. I've met Lewis Tan - had dinner with him and interviewed him both for Into the Badlands and Deadpool 2. The rest of the cast I knew from their previous work for the most part. But I didn't know Kao. I do now.

    I'm hoping for Season 2 too. I felt Season 1 started off strong, then sort of fizzled towards the very end. It gasses out a little - often a problem with martial arts shows because it's very hard to sustain good fights for every episode. The teaser for the potential of Season 2 felt a little stretched. Nevertheless, I support it like I support all martial arts shows. None of them are 'perfect' but if we don't support them, no more will get made.

    On that note, here's Celia's take on Season 2. And unlike Djuan, there are spoilers.
    Wu Assassins star Celia Au reacts to cliffhanger ending and reveals season 2 hopes
    "I was so excited for that to happen!"
    BY JESS LEE
    17/08/2019


    NETFLIX

    Note: This article contains spoilers for Wu Assassins.

    Wu Assassins launched on Netflix last week, and already attention is on whether or not there will be a second season.

    One person keeping her fingers crossed for a renewal is star Celia Au, who plays mythical spirit Ying Ying – the mentor of lead character Kai Jin (Iko Uwais). Ying Ying tasks the reluctant hero with saving the world, after he is granted the power of the Wu Assassins.


    PHOTOGRAPHY: NICK ONKEN | HAIR: COREY TUTTLE | MAKE-UP: ROMANA MAKEUP NEW YORK | STYLING: CAROLYN SON

    Across the ten episodes, Kai attempts to carry out the mission by collecting the five elemental Wu Xing, but midway through the season, Ying Ying decides to abandon Kai when he chooses to save his father Uncle Six (Byron Mann) instead of killing him when extracting the Fire Wu from inside of him.

    The season-long mission culminates in an action-packed finale which sees Alec McCullough (Tommy Flanagan) – the Wood Wu, a former Wu Assassin, and the season's Big Bad all in one – successfully opening a portal to a mythical plane called the Dao.

    With help from his friends, Kai stops McCullough and kills him in order to prevent the Dao from being corrupted.

    Six weeks later, at Jenny Wah's (Li Jun Li) restaurant, Kai is shocked to see Ying Ying again – and in the world of the living – as she delivers an ominous warning that the world still needs the Wu Assassin.


    NETFLIX

    "I was so excited for that to happen!" Au said in an interview with Digital Spy, when asked about Ying Ying being in the human world.

    Ying Ying pretty much only shared scenes with Kai and McCullough in the first season, but the twist opens up the possibility of her interacting with other characters.

    "We actually have an ongoing joke," Au added. "Lewis [Tan] who plays Lu Xin, Li [Jun Li] who plays Jenny, and Lawrence [Kao] who plays Tommy, they're like, 'For the second season, we're going to take Ying Ying shopping. She needs new clothes!'

    "How funny would it be if there's this scene where we just take Ying Ying shopping and give her a makeover? She gets a haircut, has different make-up, wears new and modern clothes, and tries to fit in this world."


    PHOTOGRAPHY: NICK ONKEN | HAIR: COREY TUTTLE | MAKE-UP: ROMANA MAKEUP NEW YORK | STYLING: CAROLYN SON

    More seriously, Au thinks that there is plenty to explore with Ying Ying, should there be a second season.

    Little is known about the character beyond the fact that she was the very first Wu Assassin and has mentored the following 999 Wu Assassins.

    "I like the fact that when you meet her and even at the very end, she's all mysterious," she said. "I definitely want to see more about what happened with the other 997 Wu Assassins.

    "In my mind, throughout the years of her failing her mission and seeing her Wu Assassins dying, she becomes less emotional and harder and harder on her Wu Assassins – because she can see the consequences and she's seen it all, and she doesn't want for it to repeat itself even though it has 999 times."

    Wu Assassins - Kai Jin (Iko Uwais)
    NETFLIX

    Au praised her co-stars, calling Uwais and Flanagan "complete sweethearts" and saying that she gets on well with the cast away from the set as well. The camaraderie shines through in the series, with the stars sharing an easy chemistry in front of the camera.

    "We're basically one big happy family," Au said, adding that they would regularly spend time and have dinner as a group. "It's rare when you have a whole cast that gets along really well, and everyone is always together and hanging out."

    As for the show's chances of a second season, the star is optimistic.

    "Right now, I have to say we're all feeling pretty good about it, but we rely on fans to keep spreading the word," she said, explaining that the higher the numbers, the more likely Netflix will renew the drama. "We're like, 'Everyone, watch the show so we can tell more stories in season 2 and continue to follow our characters!'"

    All ten episodes of Wu Assassins season 1 are available to watch on Netflix right now.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    JuJu

    HK American Actress JuJu Chan Gets Hollywood’s Attention
    By addy on August 20, 2019 in NEWS, TV Dramas



    The road to success has been long and tiresome, but as it turns out, the wait was worth it.

    Hong Kong-born American actress JuJu Chan (陳鈺芸), a recurring star in the Netflix series Wu Assassins, is gaining international attention for her role as the female bodyguard Zan. In IMDb’s Most Popular Celebs list, a weekly list as determined by IMDb users, JuJu Chan rose 905 places to 84th place in the 100 list, ranking higher than even Captain Marvel star Brie Larson this week.

    JuJu Chan is also the highest Asian celebrity on the weekly list. The other Asian celebrity on the list is her Wu Assassins costar Iko Uwais.



    IMDb users have been using the platform to praise JuJu’s performance on the show, specifically the 30 year old’s action prowess. JuJu did all of her scenes without a stunt double.

    According to producer John Wirth, the character of Zan was originally written to be a male. However, he was so impressed with JuJu’s audition that he changed the role to suit her.

    Doing action scenes for television are difficult, as there is usually limited time to train. JuJu said, “We are usually given about two hours to train and practice an action scene. The action choreography team and I would then demo the scene for the director.”

    Wu Assassins’ action choreography Dan Rizzuto praised JoJo for being a professional in the business, saying that actor usually do not participate in the demo reels. “It’s my first time seeing this in 20 years,” he said. “JuJu is very dedicated to her craft.”

    JuJu was born in Hong Kong but grew up in San Francisco, California. She attended the University of San Francisco as well as the Tisch School of the Arts. Prior to entering Hollywood, she participated in the 2010 Miss Hong Kong Pageant.

    Wu Assassins stars Indonesian action star Iko Uwais as Kai Jin, who learns that he is the last of the supernatural Wu Assassins, and is destined to kill the five Wu Warlords. The series is set in Chinatown, San Francisco, and also stars Byron Mann (文峰) and Li Jun Li.



    Source: On.cc

    This article is written by Addy for JayneStars.com.
    Still no word on Season 2, but it's tracking well so far.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    362
    yea big up JuJu, she did a great job. wont say anymore lol ....Im eagerly awaiting though
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    2019 Cover Story now online

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    First meme for our FALL 2019 issue

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    tardy meme

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    45,487

    Another meme from the FALL 2019 issue

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •