Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Keto

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,060

    Keto

    I'm surprised we don't have a thread dedicated to this already. Several of my friends have gone Keto, including my MAN AT ARMS cast mate Marko Zaror, who spoke on it in our interview MAN AT ARMS: ART OF WAR – Season 2: Cutting Loose with Marko Zaror. Also a few workmates from Tiger Claw did it (they all moved on however and no longer work here).

    Jenna Jameson Shares What She Eats Daily on the Keto Diet: 'You Will See the Weight Drop Off'
    MAURA HOHMAN
    December 04, 2018 01:03 PM

    Jenna Jameson says eats whenever she’s hungry, but the pounds are still falling off, thanks to the keto diet.

    The former adult film actress, 44, shared with fans in a recent #MondayMotivation Instagram post an “updated menu” of what she eats daily. She’s dropped more than 80 lbs. on the keto diet — a low-carb, moderate protein and high-fat eating plan — since giving birth to her daughter Batel Lu in April 2017.

    After waking up at 8 a.m., the mother of three drinks a cup of coffee with stevia and sugar-free creamer. Three hours later, she eats breakfast — usually three hard-boiled eggs, which she’s already cooked, mixed with one avocado and “everything but the bagel” seasoning.


    Jenna Jameson/Instagram

    At 2 p.m., she cooks steak in some avocado oil for lunch and serves it on a bed of arugula. Two hours later, she snacks on a cup of cottage cheese and then eats dinner at 5 p.m. For her last meal of the day, she often opts for salmon seasoned with lemon butter and dill and a side of asparagus or broccoli.

    Then, she fasts from 6 p.m. to 11 a.m. During this time, she only drinks water or tea.


    Jenna Jameson/Instagram

    In the post, the Playboy TV alum also gave a few words of caution to her fans — namely, that it’s okay to mix meat and dairy on the diet (she just doesn’t as she keeps kosher) and that “if I feel hungry, I EAT!!!!” because she’s still breastfeeding.

    She also recommends “staying away from keto breads and snacks” and instead choosing “whole organic foods … You will see the weight drop off.”


    Jenna Jameson and daughter Jenna Jameson/Instagram

    To conclude, the New York Times best-selling author writes: “Remember my friend, losing weight isn’t easy, it’s a challenge. Push past your fear of failing and make the change! Love you!”

    Now she’s got her diet down pat, Jameson recently shared with fans how she’s toning her new figure without going to the gym.


    Jenna Jameson/Instagram

    “Exercise is starting to pay off. Yes I’ve lost the weight I wanted, but I want to feel toned,” she wrote alongside a before-and-after shot of herself posted on Instagram in late November. “At my age it isn’t easy. I’m almost 45. Honestly I despise the gym. I feel self conscious and anxious when I’m there.”

    She explained that she incorporates mommy-and-me time into her workouts and finds ways to bring fitness into her daily routine.


    Jenna Jameson/Instagram

    “I told myself I would strengthen myself by hiking with Batel, walking as much as possible and run stairs,” she wrote. “It’s working. This progression proves you don’t have to spend hours in a gym… get out, move your body and live life!!!!”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Canada!
    Posts
    23,099
    I'm really glad you picked one of the old time porn stars.
    She looks like her old self again!

    As for Keto, my wife is into it and so subsequently, I get to eat a lot of those foods.
    There's a lot of new stuff but it's kind of like an atkins diet in essence.

    Lots of proteins, minimal simple carbs, good fats and stuff and so on.
    It's alright for the most part as meals go and if you have a sugar eater issue, it can help you kill that in you in a short period to where you don't really have any sweet cravings anymore. I mean, that's what I experienced anyway.

    Anyway, how about that Jenna! Hooray you Jenna!
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  3. #3

    Keto

    My wife and I started it in the spring. There was weight loss, but what we noticed most was how our clothes started fitting better, and my wife is wearing clothes she hasn't worn in years. I like the food and I don't miss bread or processed food. We also started intermittent fasting (not eating after supper till breakfast the next day, not really 'fasting IMO) with the diet and we both have lost 20lbs. It is particularly helpful for pre-diabetic people.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,060

    gout fallout

    A painful disease once known for afflicting wealthy kings is making a comeback, and fad diets like keto may be partly to blame
    Hilary Brueck, provided by
    | on January 10, 2019


    The prevalence of gout in the US population is expected to continue rising in the coming years. Photo: Dan Dalton/Getty Images/Caiaimage
    Photo: Dan Dalton/Getty Images/Caiaimage

    The prevalence of gout in the US population is expected to continue rising in the coming years.

    Gout is on the rise as more Americans indulge in purine-rich foods like beer, bacon, and beef.

    Being overweight can put people at risk of developing the form of arthritis, as can some fad diets like keto and Atkins if dieters consume too much meat.

    The prevalence of gout in the US population is expected to continue rising in the coming years.

    Feast like a king, and you could get gout like one too.

    The condition, a type of inflammatory arthritis, can arise when people load up on purine-rich foods and drinks — things like bacon, steak, scallops, veal, and alcohol. Eating and drinking too much of this stuff can cause harmful stores of uric acid to build up in our joints. That buildup can lead to sudden, painful gout symptoms in the hands and feet.

    Gout has been identified clinically since at least the time of ancient Egyptians, around 2640 BC. Traditionally, this form of arthritis affected only the small sliver of society that could afford rich meats and sugary alcohols — hence its reputation as the "disease of kings." But no more.

    Gout is making a comeback across the US. The Lewin Group, a healthcare consulting firm, estimated in 2006 that the prevalence of gout across the country would increase by 38% by 2025. The condition already affects more than one in 25 Americans and is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis, according to the Arthritis Foundation.

    One recent example: Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, reportedly has gout that sometimes leads him to use a wheelchair.

    GOUT CAN COME ON SUDDENLY AND BE EXTREMELY PAINFUL
    Hippocrates called gouty arthritis the "unwalkable disease," since the sudden pains of a bout of gout can make it nearly impossible to move.

    "An attack of gout can occur suddenly, often waking you up in the middle of the night with the sensation that your big toe is on fire," the Mayo Clinic said. "The affected joint is hot, swollen and so tender that even the weight of the sheet on it may seem intolerable."

    Gout is often triggered by hyperuricemia, or too much uric acid in our blood — the body is either producing too much or not getting rid of enough of it, so uric acid crystals begin to build up in tissues and joints. The reason poor diets make it easier to get gout is that the purine compounds in some meat, seafood, and alcohol can easily raise a person's uric acid to unsafe levels.

    During a gout episode, a person's toes, ankles, knees, elbows, wrists, and fingers can become swollen, hot, and red. The pain is most severe during the first hours, but the discomfort can last for days or weeks. People with gout can take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen (Advil) to help ease their symptoms, and ice packs can also help hurting joints. Some prescription drugs can block uric acid production in the body (xanthine oxidase inhibitors) and help remove uric acid (uricosurics).

    People with advanced gout flare-ups can develop bulbous nodules under their skin called tophi, which are bulging deposits of urate crystals.

    WHY GOUT IS MAKING A COMEBACK
    Back in the day, Benjamin Franklin (a well-known beer lover) had gout, as did Thomas Jefferson.

    In 2011, a study of more than 5,700 Americans found that 5.9% of US men and 2% of women had gout, partly because people are getting heavier and high blood pressure is becoming more common.

    Being overweight can promote gout attacks because extra weight leads to more uric acid production in the body and makes it more difficult for the kidneys — the body's built-in detoxifiers — to flush that acid. Making matters worse, drugs for high blood pressure, like water pills that make your kidneys release more sodium, often increase levels of uric acid in the body.

    Our modern diets and habits of eating to excess are also partly to blame for the condition's prevalence. Doctors have suggested that more sugary drinks in our diets may play a role as well.

    The number of people with gout is expected to continue ballooning in the coming years, along with the nation's obesity epidemic.

    CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE KETO DIET AND GOUT
    Some fad diets increase people's risk of gout too. Followers of the keto diet and other low-carbohydrate regimens sometimes trade in carb-heavy foods for more beef and other gout-inducing foods.

    "Quick-fix diets like keto and paleo, where your intake is very high in fat and proteins, those can lead to gout," Dr. Leigh Vinocur recently told The Cut. "It's ironic: modern living — from the food industrial complex to those brand-new diets like keto — have led to an uptick in one of the world's earliest diseases."

    Read more: Silicon Valley's favorite diet can lead to kidney trouble — here's how to go keto without getting sick

    But that doesn't have to be the case if low-carb diets like keto are done properly. A 2017 Yale study that used mice suggested that a keto diet may actually protect against gout by reducing inflammation in the body.

    "It's actually a better condition, as long as one stays in nutritional ketosis," Dr. Stephen Phinney, the founder of Virta Health, recently said in a video.

    Other doctors agree that relying too much on meat is a flawed approach to keto eating.

    "Some of the problem might lie in the way that people interpret the keto diet," Dr. Thomas Chi, a urologist at the University of California at San Francisco, recently told Business Insider. He added that a combination of " tons of meat" and not enough water could lead to kidney stones — another complication of gout.

    Rapid weight loss and yo-yo-dieting strategies can also contribute to severe ups and downs in the body's uric acid levels, something that can also trigger gout.

    "The body loves consistency," Phinney said.
    THREADS
    Keto
    The Atkins Diet - Your Opinions
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,060

    RIP Richard (Bud) Veech

    Richard (Bud) Veech, the Unknown Scientist Behind the Ketogenic Diet Craze Dies at 84
    Feb 5 · 10 min read
    By Travis Christofferson

    [IMG]https://miro.medium.com/max/6480/1*GvcjIcEsFUW0baIKVF3d2A.jpeg[/IMG]

    Richard (Bud) Veech, a biochemist whose research changed our understanding of human metabolism, died, or as he might say, his “great controlling nucleotide coenzymes” reached their final equilibrium on Sunday in his home in Rockville, Maryland. He was 84.
    His death was confirmed by his close friends and colleagues.
    Dr. Veech spent over 50 years studying the nuances of human metabolism. His work was highly lauded among his colleagues.
    “He has redefined our understanding of metabolism,” said Dr. Thomas Seyfried of Boston College.
    “There are probably only a few people in the world that are capable of fully appreciating his work,” said another colleague.

    Develops a “magical” elixir

    Most of his career was spent quietly uncloaking the bioenergetics of a handful of the energy coupling molecules, called nucleotide coenzymes, small molecules that act as batteries powering the thousands of reactions that comprise human metabolism.
    He then discovered something profound: a small molecule called beta-hydroxybutyrate, known as a ketone body, had some remarkable properties. Beta-hydroxybutyrate is generated naturally by the liver when a person fasts or adopts a diet called the ketogenic diet. Specifically, Dr. Veech discovered beta-hydroxybutyrate had the unique ability to increase the potential energy of the critically important energy-storing, nucleotide coenzyme called adenosine triphosphate (ATP), thus, in effect, “supercharging” our entire metabolism.
    This feature of beta-hydroxybutyrate, Dr. Veech contended, was essential to human evolution; facilitating our survival through the inevitable food shortages that have occurred throughout history. Our bodies ability to switch to ketone metabolism when food was unavailable allowed an average size person the ability survive 2 months, compared to 2 to 3 weeks under normal (carbohydrate) metabolism.
    The state of ketosis, Dr. Veech believed, was vitally important to human health, yet has been marginalized in the western world simply because of our constant access to food, especially cheap carbohydrates. “…ketosis is a normal physiologic state. I would argue it is the normal state of man. It’s not normal to have McDonald’s and a delicatessen around every corner. It’s normal to starve,” he said in a 2002 New York Times article written by Gary Taubes.
    It was Dr. Veech’s contention that many of the health problems Westerners face today are because they rarely enter the therapeutic state of ketosis. Dr. Veech often referred to ketone bodies as “superfuel” or “magic;” not in the literal sense, of course, but in the sense that they have a strange ability to correct a spectrum of health problems that manifest from a reduced capacity to generate energy efficiently―a state known as insulin resistance―a state many experience gradually as they age. Early on he recognized the potential in developing a “food-like” product that could mimic ketosis and restore the energy status of the nucleotide coenzymes that drive our metabolism.
    He went on to collaborate with Kieran Clarke at the University of Oxford on the development of a molecule called a ketone ester that when ingested gets converted into the same ketone bodies that the body naturally manufactures during ketosis without the onus of fasting or eating a ketogenic diet.
    Dr. Veech held the unwaveringly belief that the ketone ester has the potential to cheaply and safely treat the most pressing chronic diseases of the western world: Alzheimer’s, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, in addition to a list of other seemingly unrelated conditions like traumatic brain injury, Parkinson’s, and radiation poisoning. In a 2003 publication he asked the question “What are the potential uses of beta-hydroxybutyrate?” His answer: “Theoretically any condition wherein oxygen supply to the cells may be limited is an avenue for investigation. This list would encompass almost every disease state.”
    Recent research has uncovered additional qualities of beta-hydroxybutyrate, specifically, its ability to act as a signaling molecule, altering gene expression in a way that promotes longevity―a quality that Dr. Veech, remarkably, predicted over 15 years ago. “Finally a chemical agent, beta-hydroxybutyrate, that has played such a major role in man’s survival may be expected to have actions other than simple calories. When nature has a beneficial substance, it may become pleiotropic through evolution with other survival advantages.” Dr. Veech described the strangely far-reaching potential of the ketone ester as the “most important discovery since penicillin.” Clarke said in a 2019 article in The Atlantic, that she believes that the ketone ester will eventually be “more or less a general tonic for the general population.”
    Born on September 19th 1935, Veech grew up in Decatur Illinois. After graduating from High School in 1953 he went on to Harvard and was delighted by the inclusive nature of his education. “[It] was a very interesting department. It was founded by a chemist, Charles Eliot, who decided that everyone that was educated needed to have knowledge of the Bible, Shakespeare, Greek history, Greek tragedy, Russian novels, and a foreign language. You had three-hour oral exams. It was very good, very good, very good undergraduate education,” he said in a 2017 interview with Dave Asprey.
    His interest shifted to medicine and he went on to medical school at Harvard University, graduating at the top of his class in 1962. During his residency he had an epiphany that would change his trajectory: “I didn’t know much at all,” about how to treat the diseases that were killing people and thought “I better learn more.”
    After looking into different laboratories, he ended up at the one he thought “was the best in the world.” It was the Oxford laboratory of Sir Hans Krebs, the winner of the 1953 Nobel Prize for mapping out the cyclical sequence of metabolic reactions that are central to cellular energy production, today commonly referred to as the “Krebs cycle.”
    Immediately after arriving in Oxford, Dr. Krebs gave Veech an extremely difficult project: measure the potential energy stored within the nucleotide coenzyme NADPH by measuring the ratio of its oxidized form to its reduced form. The task was incredibly technically difficult due to the vanishingly small amount contained within the cell. After a year of painstaking work, he had the result and presented his data to the group. “That can’t be right,” commented Krebs. “Well, god****it it is right,” Veech shot back. In the end, Veech’s results were right and led to him and Krebs co-authoring the longest publication of Kreb’s career.
    In the fall of 1968, while still at Oxford studying under Krebs, Veech was invited to Boston to give a talk about his research. On his way home, his airplane, upon descent, crashed into Moose Mountain in New Hampshire. The crash killed 32 of 42 passengers and crew. Dr. Veech was one of ten others at the back of the airplane that survived. He was credited with pulling two other passengers to safety before the wreckage was engulfed in flames. One survivor vividly remembered standing with a group of survivors after they had escaped the mangled fuselage and then hearing a man yelling, trapped under the wreckage. The survivor recalled Dr. Veech and a man named Robert Kimball, the then assistant dean at Dartmouth, without hesitation rushed back into the burning wreckage to save the man. Dr. Veech then set about caring for the survivors as best as he could with no medical supplies. He did this despite having multiple lacerations, a broken rib and a crushed vertebra. One survivor described Dr. Veech as “The real hero of this accident.”
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,060

    Continued from previous post

    [IMG]https://miro.medium.com/max/683/1*KMsHD0CysHF5V78MtB0UJg.jpeg[/IMG]

    Shortly after recovering from the airplane accident he landed at the N.I.H. where he began studying the mechanisms behind cellular energy production and the unique importance of the then obscure form of metabolism known as ketosis. Hans Krebs and the great Albert Lehninger would often stop into his lab to talk about the latest discoveries and suggest directions for future research. Dr. Veech’s research ultimately led to the production of the ketone ester followed by a flurry of publications suggesting the ester’s potential ability to treat a variety of disease states.
    The career of a scientist is a curious thing. All-too-often a great scientific career is only fully appreciated in hindsight. Dr. Veech had no interest in fame or self-promotion. He felt that it was “unseemly for doctors to promote themselves.” He hoped to be judged on the merit of his work in the present. More than anything, he wanted the world to appreciate the importance of the ketone ester and was frustrated that it’s potential to mitigate so many of our most immediate health issues wasn’t fully appreciated. “He was optimistic that each publication would convince people of the ester’s importance, but then he often felt let down,” said his college roommate who remained his close friend until his death.
    But if history is a guide, the full appreciation of medical knowledge is often delayed or even forgotten. The British Royal Navy reluctantly made it policy to stock citrus for naval voyages fifty-years after James Lind provided unequivocal proof it was the cure for scurvy. The ketogenic diet, once the standard-of-care for pediatric epilepsy in the 1920’s, was all-but forgotten until being rediscovered and championed in the 1990’s by Hollywood movie producer Jim Abrahams after the diet instantaneously cured his son Charlie who had failed multiple drugs and was having hundreds of seizures a day.
    The public may not have appreciated the potential of Dr. Veech’s ester as quickly as he would have liked, but by 2004 the Military had begun to take notice. After writing a letter explaining the potential of the ketone ester to improve the endurance and mental performance of Special Forces―citing previous publications including one showing that a mouse heart can pump 25% stronger while using less oxygen when the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate is added as a fuel, DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration, cut Dr. Veech a check for 10 million dollars to develop the ketone ester. “N.I.H. have never given money for this kind of metabolic research,” said Dr. Veech.
    It was Dr. Veech’s greatest hope, however, that one day the ketone ester would have use beyond just military application; that it would be fully appreciated for what he felt it was capable of: improving the lives of millions of people.
    In the winter of 2015, with his 55th Harvard reunion fast approaching, Dr. Veech penned a letter to his classmates extoling the virtues of the ketone ester: “As most of us will be entering our 8th decade, far beyond our allotted 3 score and ten, I thought it might be of interest to present to my classmates some of the research findings that have occupied me for the past 20 years concerning the accompaniment of aging.”
    He then listed off 10 publications supporting the ester’s ability to ameliorate age related cognitive impairment.

    A maverick scientist

    Creative collaborations often fatefully fall together and Dr. Veech’s laboratory was no exception. Some aspects of it resembled a pirate’s ship: a crew of unlikely, mavericks that connected accidentally yet somehow fit together in a beautiful harmony. One collaborator, William Curtis, a Parkinson’s patient with a background in biochemistry, came to Dr. Veech’s lab in search of help for his disease after reading an article in the journal Neurology about a small study done at Colombia showing that a ketogenic diet improved the symptoms of Parkinson’s patients by 43%. The diet sounded miserable to Curtis, however, deep in the reference section he found Dr. Veech and went to see him. At first, Dr. Veech didn’t think he could help Curtis. “No, I can’t do anything. I can’t do anything for you. We don’t have enough stuff, go way,” he said. But Curtis stayed. The two eventually became friends and started collaborating. Today, Curtis credits the ketogenic diet and Veech’s ketone ester for taking him from nearly frozen to functional.
    Genius, too, often appears in unusual packages. Those that knew Dr. Veech well describe him as a colorful character. To be sure, he had little patience for fools. He was refreshingly, and at times, shockingly, blunt. He said it exactly how he saw it with as few words as possible and little thought for political correctness. “Read the **** papers,” he once told a reporter asking him to explain the ketone ester’s significance. Although some may have been put-off by his rough edges, others appreciated his straight forward style. “I love how blunt you are,” said Asprey, during the 2017 interview with Dr. Veech.
    There was another side to Dr. Veech. For those he loved he was gracious and thoughtful, as illustrated in a letter he wrote to the two sons of a deeply respected colleague, George Cahill, upon Cahill’s death. “It is one of my proudest accomplishments to have been cited as a single co-author with Dr Cahill [on] one of his last publications. Dr. Cahill died at 85 while singing with two of his daughter’s Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus. I related this to a young student studying ketosis in athletes and she exclaimed ‘He must have gone immediately to heaven.’ That is an idea that all of us who knew him would share.”
    One aspect of Dr. Veech that all his colleagues seem to agree on is that he was a rare scientific genius―on the scale of the greats from the “golden era” of biochemistry; names like Sir Hans Krebs, Otto Warburg, and Albert Lehninger.
    This author was lucky enough to have had a beer with Dr. Veech and a small group of scientists at a conference a few years ago. We had a delightful conversation about many topics. Mostly we laughed. I can still picture Dr. Veech’s crooked smile and his authentic and infectious guffaw. It was one of a handful of moments I will cherish forever. I knew I was in the presence of greatness. Not today’s brand of greatness: celebrities, athletes or YouTube stars, but rather greatness of a different era.
    Interesting. I never did the background research on the origins of Keto.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,060

    False positive for ETOH

    American Airlines Flight Attendant Claims He Was Sacked Because of the Keto Diet
    17TH FEBRUARY 2020



    MATEUSZ MASZCZYNSKI
    Mateusz Maszczynski is a serving international flight attendant with experience…

    A former American Airlines flight attendant who was sacked after failing an alcohol breathalyzer test is fighting for his job back, claiming that going on the controversial Keto diet led to a false positive. The keto or ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet that can help burn fat more effectively but can lead to lower alcohol tolerance.

    Not that Andrew Riley had even drunk any alcohol before the random breathalyzer test he claims. Instead, Riley believes the Keto diet had caused a false-positive.


    Photo Credit: American Airlines

    When your body goes into a metabolic state of ketosis, the liver breaks down fat for fuel and in turn, acetone is produced as a byproduct. Some of that unwanted acetone can then be released in your breath as isopropyl alcohol.

    Some breathalyzers can tell the difference between ethanol and isopropyl – some of the cheaper models can’t and that’s when someone on the Keto diet could find themselves in trouble.

    “I wasn’t drinking I wasn’t doing anything, just because I changed my diet,” Riley said in an interview with Fox 46 Charlotte.

    “I don’t want to be punished and take consequences for something that I didn’t do, That’s like admitting to a crime or going to jail even though I didn’t do it,” he continued.

    Pilots and flight attendants aren’t allowed to drink within eight hours of a flight and even then, the maximum blood alcohol level is just 0.04. The FAA has the right to randomly breathalyze flight attendants and in Riley’s case, he blew 0.05.

    This wasn’t the first time he had failed a breathalyzer test. Riley also failed a 2013 test and under Department of Transport (DOT) rules, two failed tests mean permanent disqualification.

    The now-disqualified flight attendant says he has filed an appeal with both American Airlines and the DOT in an attempt to get his job back. He’s hoping the authorities will introduce a more accurate test that would be able to tell the difference between isopropyl and ethanol.

    American Airlines has declined to comment
    Interesting side effect. Anyone know more about this?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Canada!
    Posts
    23,099
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Interesting side effect. Anyone know more about this?
    That is interesting indeed.
    I've not heard of it before and I am in touch with the Keto world these days.
    I'll look about and see if I can find something.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,060

    acetone

    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    I'll look about and see if I can find something.
    Cool. Thanks. I'm fascinated by false positives. I had an old nurse friend that did drug testing; she volunteered alongside me at the clinic but she moved to TX. I suppose I could reach out over facebook or something. Let us know what you find.

    We used to have a few guys at Tiger Claw that were into it. And Marco Zaror gave me a huge education in it (which is how I opened this here thread). But it's not my thing at all.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •